15 Myths About Wild Birds

Uncooked rice will make a birds stomach swell up and explode! True or False?

Hummingbirds never land, they always hover. Right or Wrong?

If you feed peanut butter to birds, it will stick to the roof of their mouths and they will choke. Yes or No?

I'm not sure where these crazy ideas came from, but you can find the real truths here.

peanut butter jars
peanut butter jars | Source

1. Don’t feed peanut butter to birds, they will choke on it. NOT!

I have been using peanut butter for many years. I have observed that my birds take tiny amounts, fly to the nearest tree, poke it under a piece of bark and eat it as though it were a bug they found.

If you are uncomfortable giving nutritious high energy peanut butter to your birds, just mix it with some sunflower seeds!


2. Don’t bother raking up old seed hulls, they will compost automatically, right? WRONG!

Leaving seed hulls on the ground encourages mold and disease. Besides, sunflower seeds have a toxin that prevents other plants from sprouting and growing properly. It’s best to rake up the seed and discard it on a regular basis.

tufted titmouse on metal bird feeder perch
tufted titmouse on metal bird feeder perch | Source

3. Don’t buy bird feeders with metal perches because birds’ feet will freeze to them. NO!

Birds’ feet are protected by tough scaly tissue that keeps their feet dry, so there is no moisture to cause their feet to freeze to metal objects.

ruby throated hummingbird sipping nectar
ruby throated hummingbird sipping nectar | Source

4. It’s absolutely necessary to add red dye in order to attract hummers to a nectar feeder. ABSOLUTELY FALSE! Hummers are attracted to red flowers as well as pink and orange. But they will come to nectar feeders no matter what color they are once they find them. In order for your hummers to more readily find a new nectar feeder that doesn’t have some red on it, attach a red ribbon to the hanger, or set a pot of red flowers nearby. They will find it! Skip the red dye.

5. If you keep nectar out for the hummers, they will stick around and freeze. NO!

Mine have scheduled departure and arrival times I can set my clock by no matter whether the nectar feeder is still out or not. They are genetically programmed by weather conditions and the amount of daylight.


6. Hummers hitch rides on the backs of geese.

No such thing has ever been documented!

Black Chinned Hummer perched on branch
Black Chinned Hummer perched on branch | Source

7. A sudden cold snap will kill hummers. NOT TRUE!

Hummers have the ability to attain a state of torpor that slows down their metabolism until warmth returns and they regain their natural “Speedy Gonzalez” hyperactivity.


8. Hummingbirds never land, they always hover. They only eat nectar. NOPE!

Hummers land very often to rest, take a shower if it’s raining and watch for another hummer to make an attempt at raiding ‘their’ nectar feeder. They also eat tiny insects and spiders. In fact, they use spider silk to line their nests.

blue jays in bird bath
blue jays in bird bath | Source

9. Don’t bother to clean the bird bath, birds use mud puddles, don’t they? CONSIDER THIS:

Unclean bird baths are perfect breeding grounds for algae, mosquito larvae and mold. Definitely keep those bird baths clean and filled with clean water on a regular basis!

white moth
white moth | Source


10. Don’t worry about webs in last year’s birdseed. After all, it’s a moth infestation and birds eat moths, right? WRONG!

The larvae has sapped all the nutrition from the seeds and rendered it useless to the birds. Moreover, the moths have hatched and long since flown away.

mourning dove
mourning dove | Source

11. Red milo seed is a filler only, no birds eat it. NOT SO!

Quails, wild turkeys, pigeons, doves, pheasants, and sparrows love it.


12. Feeding birds is an eternal chore because once you start they will starve without your help. NO!

Only approx. 20-25% of birds’ food comes from feeders. The rest they forage for themselves all year long. Feeding nutritious black oil sunflower seeds helps them use less energy foraging and increases survival rates. But they will not starve if you go on vacation for a month.

13. Uncooked rice will make birds’ stomachs swell up and explode. ABSOLUTELY NOT!

Most birds eat all kinds of grains, including rice, with no ill effects at all. It’s part of their natural diet.


14. You don’t need to feed birds when it gets warm. NOT TRUE!

Actually, that is when birds are feeding and raising their young. They appreciate saving energy foraging if there is a ready supply easily available to help sustain Mom and Pop. The babies need protein, which means the parents need a huge supply of worms, larvae and other unsavory (to us) creepy crawlers. A feeder can be a great help for a hungry and exhausted parent bird.

upside down squirrel
upside down squirrel | Source

15. You can buy a squirrel-proof feeder. UH, NO.

Some feeders are actually squirrel resistant, but take it from me, there are NO SQUIRREL-PROOF feeders out there. Squirrels are extremely clever, agile and persistent contortionists. They will eventually find a way to get into your feeders!

There's also an old saying about never feeding salt to birds, that has its basis in science. Salt is not a natural part of their diet, but birds can process a small amount. Large amounts can be dangerous if not fatal. If you like to toss popcorn out to your birds occasionally, try to give them unsalted and air-popped if possible.

And never give wild birds anything with caffeine, iceberg lettuce, alcohol, avocados or chocolate!

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Comments 54 comments

gogogo 4 years ago

Birds fascinate me, where I live is near an open area and we get lots of birds


Leah Helensdottr profile image

Leah Helensdottr 4 years ago from Colorado

Very interesting, grandmapearl! I didn't know any of these facts, and if I ever decide to feed the birds, I'll keep your excellent advice in mind. However, since they seem to be doing fine without my help, and the last thing I want to do is risk attracting wild turkeys, I'll rest content knowing the other birds are managing without me.


JKenny profile image

JKenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

Great article. Some very good and useful advice. Voted up.


KimmiS profile image

KimmiS 4 years ago from Vancouver, Canada

Any tricks for keeping squirrels out of the feeders?


rsusan profile image

rsusan 4 years ago from South Africa

Loved these, Connie! Very useful info. The picture of the blue jays is so sweet! Do you have a good recipe for use in a nectar feeder?

Rika


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi gogogo! Watching and feeding wild birds is a great hobby. It can be very relaxing as well. Researchers claim that people who watch and/or feed backyard birds have a much lower stress level! Thanks for visiting and commenting. It is very much appreciated.


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi Leah! Thanks for your great comments. But I am curious, why don't you want to attract wild turkeys? Thanks for stopping by!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Thanks JKenny for the great comments and the Vote. They are very much appreciated. I am glad you found this Hub useful. Thanks for stopping by!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi KimmiS! Actually, I do feed the squirrels in a different part of my backyard. I leave cracked corn for them, and occasionally I set out ears of corn. They are very fond of corn, and that keeps them busy while my birds are free to eat in peace! As they say, if you can't lick 'em, join 'em. Since I haven't found a way to lick 'em, I chose this strategy instead. Works great for me! There are also wooden 'peanut boxes' with hinged lids that you can mount in your yard. Fill them with whole peanuts and the squirrels will be totally occupied with opening the box and extracting and eating the peanuts. Thanks for the great question, and for stopping by!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi rsusan! So great to have you stop by and visit again. I'm glad you enjoyed the blue jays. I do have my own nectar recipe that's very easy, and the hummingbirds love it. To a quart-size microwaveable container with a spout, such as a large 'Pyrex' glass measuring container, add 1/2 cup sugar (just plain old sugar). Then fill the container up to the 2-1/2 cup line with cold tap water. Stir with a wooden spoon to mix in the sugar. Microwave on high for about 2 to 2-1/2 minutes, or until the sugar has dissolved. Allow to cool for about an hour and then refrigerate in a sealed glass container until ready for use.

I love hummingbirds, and usually have several that come and say 'hi' when they arrive from South America in May. If I am outside they will come up to me at eye level and hover for a few seconds. It never ceases to amaze me! I am glad you enjoyed this Hub!


rsusan profile image

rsusan 4 years ago from South Africa

Thank you, Connie! Will give this a try. I am sure the hummingbirds think it is quite yummy!

I was surprised to discover that our Cape Wagtails can also hover like hummingbirds. I was teaching them to eat cheese from my hand. Then, one day, I was standing and I held a piece of grated cheese between my fingers. The wagtail flew up to me and hovered close to my fingers until it could grab the cheese. This has now become quite a game! A second one also learned to do this. Looks like they love it. I have never seen them hovering like this before. What a treat for them and for me as well!


Seeker7 profile image

Seeker7 4 years ago from Fife, Scotland

This is a really beautiful and interesting hub. The photos are stunning. I love all my wild birds, but I wish Scotland had hummers - they are adorable!

I was laughing at the squirrel!! You're absolutely right! Over the years I think I've tried every brand of 'squirrel proof' feeder and the clever little tikes do get into them eventually! I actually like squirrels a lot so I don't have the heart to chase them off, I just make sure my birds get their fare share as well.

I really enjoyed this hub and the information was all new to me - very interesting and some really strange myths about our feathered friends. As you rightly say, where do these stories come from? LOL! Voted up + beautiful + awesome!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi Seeker7! It's always great to have you stop by and visit. Thanks for the Votes and the wonderful comments.

I love my squirrels as well. I used to think they were just pesky until I found a baby 'late-born' squirrel. The local animal rehabbers don't like it when in late summer these babies turn up. The problem is that they won't be mature enough when the cold weather hits to make it on their own. Squirrel Moms and Pops have their own survival problems, so it doesn't usually end up very well for the late-borns. That little baby was so small and cold. I used a small empty Kleenex box and filled it with shredded newspaper and some cotton quilt batting I had. Then I placed it under a lamp to help warm it up as the rehabber had advised me over the phone. By the time she got here to pick it up, the little guy had started moving around and calling out. She thought that it just might make it! I have often wondered if it did survive. But my view of squirrels changed drastically after that.

Now I feed them separately in another part of my yard. They love corn, so that is what I set out for them. And it keeps them busy long enough for my birds to eat their seeds in peace.

I'm glad you enjoyed this Hub!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi rsusan! What a wonderful experience to have birds eat from your hand! It must have been quite thrilling to have that winged creature so close. I had no idea that any bird would eat cheese! I love to learn new things about birds. Thank you for sharing your amazing story.


rsusan profile image

rsusan 4 years ago from South Africa

Yes, Connie, it is wonderful and a privilege. They seem so excited in the mornings when they call outside, waiting for their 'breakfast'! I don't know about other birds, but wagtails absolutely adore grated cheese. They probably think the slivers are little yellow worms or something! We have taken pictures of them as they feed in this way - perhaps I will send you one or two sometime.


Leah Helensdottr profile image

Leah Helensdottr 4 years ago from Colorado

grandmapearl, you ask why I don't want to attract wild turkeys. I've explained it all in http://leahhelensdottr.hubpages.com/hub/Wild-Turke... Would you like to have my wild turkeys? I'll gladly box them up and send them to you!


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

This is great information, I know so little about how to feed birds, I remember seeing on tv about how to keep squirrels off the feeder, but for the life of me I can't remember what they said! lol! it was coating it with something natural, not sure what, really interesting hub, thanks!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi rsusan, I would love to see pictures of your wagtails, especially while eating grated cheese. That would be lovely. Thank you


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

I read your 'Wild Turkeys in My Garden' Hub, and now I definitely see where you're coming from on not wanting to attract them. A very hilarious take on a bad situation!

Uh, you can keep your turkeys, thank you very much!!

Thanks for telling me about them, though. I really enjoyed your Hub! Now Following You by the way.


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi Nell Rose, Thanks for stopping by, and for the great comments. I have heard of people using vegetable oil on the feeder pole to keep squirrels off, but I don't know how well that works. I have used PVC pipes to cover my feeder poles. They are the white 4" diameter sewer-type plastic pipes. The squirrels can't seem to find a good purchase, but the racoons find this no challenge at all!


Dale Hyde profile image

Dale Hyde 4 years ago from Tropical Paradise on Planet X

Love it grandmapearl! I knew all but two of what you reference in the hub. I was always told that rice would explode the tummy of a bird, and never threw out wedding rice because of that... I stand corrected. About the squirrels...well I agree with all you say, but I thought for sure that someone would have out smarted them critters by now, but I see not! I stand corrected again! I fully enjoyed the hub, a Friday treat for me.

Keep up the excellent hubbing! Voted up, interesting and useful!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi Dale! I don't know where that rice thing got started, except that possibly someone had the brilliant idea that selling soap bubble stuff would make them some money and it was a marketing ploy? As to the squirrels, I use a special feeder for them that holds peanuts. They can pull out one at a time by lifting the lid, which closes automatically. It keeps them busy and away from the more expensive bird seed! If there really is a squirrel-proof bird seed feeder out there, I'd sure like to know about it! Your wonderful comments always keep me motivated to keep hubbing. Many thanks for them and the votes. Much appreciated.


Dale Hyde profile image

Dale Hyde 4 years ago from Tropical Paradise on Planet X

Hi grandmapearl! You know the peanut idea is nice! I will have to keep that one in mind! I have no idea where the rice rumor came from, just one of those "ingrained" things, lol. :)


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Thanks for the chuckle this morning, Dale!


CelticWillow67 profile image

CelticWillow67 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

What an informative article grandmapearl! I got more wrong than right, and I thought I knew a little something about birds! I have been feeding them for many years now, but I am guided by your article to make a few changes. Thank you for sharing your wisdom. I voted up and useful :-)


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi CelticWillow67. I'm so glad you enjoyed this Hub. And thank you most especially for the great votes-they are very much appreciated. I have to admit that I'm still learning about my backyard birds after more than 35 years of watching and studying them! As a matter of fact, I recently started using a special peanut feeder for my squirrels. The lid snaps shut so they only get one peanut at a time, but it keeps them busy in another part of the yard. My birds can eat happily at their leisure. Peanuts are much cheaper than black oil sunflower seed! And after all, squirrels get hungry, too! Thanks for stopping by. :)


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

Voted useful. Another great and interesting piece. This Bird Lady will be back for more.


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi aviannovice! Thanks very much for the vote and the nice compliments. I am so glad you enjoyed my article. We share a love for wild birds for sure!


Stephanie Henkel profile image

Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

Great list of myth busters here! I always wondered if keeping my hummingbird feeders filled would entice the hummers to stay longer- it's good to know that they don't allow well intentioned people to interfere with their schedules! Having watched humming birds for years, I often watch them as they perch on the feeder to drink or on nearby branches to guard "their" feeder. They are really not into sharing! :) Thanks for a great article! Voted up and shared.


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 4 years ago from Oakley, CA

What a great article with lots of useful information. I don't know how some of these old wive's tales get started, but it is always refreshing to see them debunked.

My husband loves animals, and he would be the first to debunk that hummers never land--he's had them land on him!!

Voted up, awesome, interesting and shared.


Nettlemere profile image

Nettlemere 4 years ago from Burnley, Lancashire, UK

Very interesting especially the hummingbird facts since we don't have them in the UK and I know little about them. I love the one with the purple V neck! Pinned.


jennzie profile image

jennzie 4 years ago from Lower Bucks County, PA

Very interesting hub- thanks for debunking these myths. I also love birds, blue jays and cardinals in particular. Will share!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi Stephanie, those little hummers are very independent for sure. I guess you have to be aggressive and independent to be so small and survive crossing the Gulf of Mexico every year to return to the good old USA to breed! I really enjoy their antics at the feeders, or while 'guarding' them. And you are right, they definitely are not into sharing! Thanks so much for your comments, vote and share. They are very much appreciated.


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi DzyMsLizzy, thanks so much for stopping by and sharing your comments. I would love to see a picture of a hummer landing on your husband! I've had them buzz my head as they were flying to and from the feeders. It would be amazing to have one land on me. Once in a while a female ruby throat will hover in front of my face at eye level. I think she is thanking me for the nectar! Thanks so much for the votes and for sharing. Your visit is very much appreciated.


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi Nettlemere, so glad you stopped by and commented. I know it is strange that hummers only appear in North and South America. If you ever get a chance to visit the US in the summertime, look for gardens with tubular flowers. Chances are there will be hummers flying around them! Their colors are truly jewel like when the sunlight hits them. I love our little ruby-throated humming birds. The females don't have the ruby throat, only the males. The females do have iridescent emerald green feathers, though. So beautiful. They are all distinctive in their own way whether purple, orange, green or red! Thank you so much for pinning--that's awesome!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi jennzie, thanks so much for stopping by and commenting. Somehow these myths get started and seem to stick with people. It's great fun to debunk them with the actual facts! I am very partial to my blue jays and cardinals as well. Some people think that blue jays are bully birds. It's true they can be aggressive at the feeders, but they are so beautiful. And I absolutely love all the sounds they make. Because they love day old bread, I often leave bits of a piece for them at the tray feeders. I walk perhaps 3 steps away from the feeders, and look around to see that they are already chowing down! My cardinals most often come at dusk. I make sure there are still seeds in the feeder for them. In the wintertime, seeing the beautiful blue jays and cardinals against the white snow is a sight to which I always look forward! Thank you for visiting and for the Share! It is very much appreciated.


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

Great piece. I am pleased that you did this article, as people fall prey to these myths quote often. Voted up and awesome.


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Thank you aviannovice for your great comments and your votes. I agree with you that people need to hear the real truth, so that these kinds of myths do not continue to persist. I'm so glad you stopped by. It is most appreciated!


alifeofdesign profile image

alifeofdesign 4 years ago from New Hamphire

Hello grandmapearl. I stopped by to check out your hub because I love birds. I guess I didn't realize that there were so many bird myths. Thank you for dispelling them! I got a chuckle when you mentioned there is really no such thing as a squirrel-proof feeder -I agree! We are fortunate to have a large variety of birds around our New Hampshire home. They are so wonderful to see and listen to. Thank you for this hub.


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi alifeofdesign! Thanks so much for stopping by, and for the great comments. Anyone whose property attracts a large variety of birds is fortunate indeed. I don't know about you, but I just love the 'dawn chorus' when all those birds raise their voices to announce a new day! My squirrels seem to be quite clever and acrobatic. They know exactly where and how to crack open any feeder! That's why I give them their own whirligig corn feeder. It makes a great distraction, and keeps them busy while my songbirds enjoy their sunflower seed. I enjoyed your visit!


sgbrown profile image

sgbrown 4 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

Great information. I wasn't aware of the toxins in the sunflower seed hulls. Guess I need to start raking them up! My husband did "squirrel proof" our bird feeder. I have only had a squirrel on my bird feeder one time this year and I think he just got lucky! I did write a hub about it last year, if you want to check it out. I love your information and pictures! I agree, it's so beautiful to see Blue Jays and Cardinals in winter. Great hub! Voted up +++! Have a wonderful day! :)


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi sgbrown! Thank you so much for the great comments. I will definitely check out your 'squirrel proof' bird feeder hub. That sounds very interesting to me. I'm very glad you found this hub useful. Your visit is very much appreciated as are your votes. I did have a wonderful day, thank you. It was spent cleaning up a beautiful place in our area called 'Bottcher's Landing'. It's really a tiny boat launch on the Chemung River. But there is also a pavilion, lots of parking space and a hedgerow on one side, with corn fields beyond that. That hedgerow was just full of birds chattering and singing!


Scribenet profile image

Scribenet 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

Wow...great and useful info...I knew many but definitely not all. Cool about the peanut butter, wish I had known that years ago!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi Scribenet, I'm so glad you enjoyed this article. Peanut butter is one of the treats I use for my birds on a regular basis. I stuff it into the crevices of tree bark when it is cold and snowy. Then I watch my woodpeckers, nuthatches and even chickadees as they find their nutritious treasure! Thanks for stopping by and commenting. It is very much appreciated.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

What a wonderful hub Pearl;as you know I love anything to do with nature and this one was a teat.

Have a wonderful day my friend.

Eddy.


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 4 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi Eddy! I'm glad you enjoyed this article. Your support and comments are always very much appreciated. Nature has so many wonderful surprises for us, doesn't she? I hope you have a terrific day. Thank you my friend. Pearl


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 years ago from sunny Florida

Great hub. Thanks for pointing out the falsehoods that have become almost urban legends.

And it is so important for your readers to know how important it is to keep things clean and cleaned up for our earth and for our little feathered friends. I will be back..can't enough of the birdie reads.

Sending you Angels :) ps


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Hi ps! So glad you stopped by, and that you enjoyed this article. I am like you when it comes to our wildlife. We are the guardians of this Earth; what we do totally effects all living creatures. And I know you share my passion about our wild birds.

It's always such a pleasure when you stop by. And thanks so much for the supportive comments, and of course, the Angels!

Wishing you a sparkling day!

Pearl


Silver Poet profile image

Silver Poet 3 years ago from the computer of a midwestern American writer

I'm glad you debunked a few myths. I love feeding bird and hope to get back to it soon.


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Thanks Silver Poet! It's amazing how some of these myths are perpetuated, like the rice thing. So glad you enjoyed this article. I really enjoy feeding and watching my backyard birds year round. Sometimes it's a challenge with all the critters around here, but the birds sure appreciated it!

Pearl


Linda Compton profile image

Linda Compton 3 years ago from The Land of Enchantment

Dear Grandmapearl,

What a wonderful hub! And what a legacy you are continuing in honor of your wise and loving grandparents! I am eager to read more of your bird hubs. I am a birder and so grateful for all the learning and delight they give me. I always ask their permission before I photograph them and keep my "models" well fed and watered :)


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

Dear Linda, I am always so glad to meet a fellow 'birder'. You and I share a passion for these wonders of Nature; and for keeping them in the best condition possible. I always marvel at the distances they travel to come back and spend the summer with me!

Thank you for your supportive and interesting comments. They are very much appreciated, as is your visit. I hope you have a lovely day!

;) Pearl


epbooks profile image

epbooks 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

I never had wild birds, but I grew up having cockatiels and parakeets, so I knew the answer to the peanut butter question. I remember feeding them peanut butter with the baby formula when they were just young chicks and then weaning them off to the mullet spray. Very helpful hub! Voted up!


grandmapearl profile image

grandmapearl 3 years ago from Southern Tier New York State Author

epbooks, thank you for your great comments! How interesting to have used peanut butter and baby formula to feed young parakeets and cockatiels. I have very little knowledge of them, other than the 'budgies' that my Grandmother Card had. She preferred the blue ones, and did succeed in teaching them to say a couple of words and short phrases. Grandma knew how to clip their wings so they could fly around the dining room without getting hurt. She often left the window open with a screen so they could enjoy the fresh air in the summertime. She pampered them with cuddle bone treats and all kinds of toys, and gave them an apple peel every day. They lived a very long time, as I recall. Thanks for prompting those memories, and for the supportive compliments and votes. I hope you have an awesome day ;) Pearl

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