Amazing Amazon Parrots

The Blue-fronted Amazon Parrot

By Charlessharp CC BY-SA 4.0
By Charlessharp CC BY-SA 4.0 | Source

The blue-fronted Amazon parrot's scientific name is Amazona aestiva. They are also called the Turquoise-fronted Amazon. They are found in Central America and South America. They live in the rain forest and jungles. They like to eat leaves, flowers, insects and seeds.

The blue-fronted Amazon parrot is 12 to 14 inches. Their body is mostly green with a blue front. Their head and forehead will have other colors. The blue-fronted parrot's forehead has light blue feathers on it.

They are great climbers, but not good at flying. When they walk on the ground, they are very clumsy.

They will climb, crack nuts and crack seeds using their beak. They will also use it to pick flowers and fruit. Their color combination blends in great with their surroundings.

The male blue-fronted Amazon parrot will build a nest. The eggs are incubated by the female for 30 days until they hatch, and the male will bring her food. In about 30 days the eggs will hatch. The babies will leave the nest in 60 days.

The blue-fronted Amazon parrot is very popular as a pet. The make great talkers. They are not threatened at this time


The Cuban Amazon Parrot

By Snowmanradio CC BY-SA 2.0
By Snowmanradio CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The Cuban amazon is 11 to 13 inches long. Their body is mostly green, and their wings will have some blue feathers on them. They have a black rim on their green feathers. They have a rosy pink throat, chin and lower face. They have white eye-rings and forehead.

During breeding season, the Cuban Amazon flocks will break up into pairs. They will nest in tree cavities. The female Cuban Amazon will lay 2 to 4 eggs and sit on them for 26 to 28 days.

The Cuban amazon will eat fruit and seeds. The Cuban Amazon really likes to eat the palm tree fruit.

The Cuban Amazon threatened because of habitat loss, and they are captured for the pet trade. The orange-winged Amazon is found in parts of South America. They like to make their home in the forests and semi-open country.

The Orange-winged Amazon Parrot

By Snowmanradio GNU Free Documentation License 1.2
By Snowmanradio GNU Free Documentation License 1.2 | Source

The orange-winged Amazon is large being 13 inches long and weighing 340 gm. Their head has blue and yellow feathers on it. Their wings and tail are orange. The orange shows up when they are flying.

The orange-winged Amazon is extremely noisy, and they will let out very loud high-pitched screams.

They will eat fruit and seeds. They will eat the palm tree fruit at times.

They like palm trees to roost in. They will also use other trees, but they prefer the palm. They will form large groups when they are roosting.

There are many of them living in the wild in Miami, Florida. They were once pets that got away or were turned loose. They are beautiful birds, but when kept as pets, they can be very noisy and cause a problem, so many people get rid of them.

They female lays 3 to 4 eggs and sits on them until they hatch in 26 days. The babies will leave the nest when they are 60 days old.

There are not considered threatened at this time.


The Green-cheeked Amazon Parrot

By Dean Sas CC BY-SA 2.0
By Dean Sas CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The green-cheeked amazon's scientific name is Amazone veridigenalis. They are also called the Red-crowned Amazon.

The green-cheeked amazon is found in parts of Mexico They like to live in forests and groves of trees in cleared areas.

They like to eat nuts, berries, flowers and fruit.

The green-cheeked amazon is 13 inches long. They are a chubby parrot with a short tail. Their back and wings are dark green. Their belly is a lighter green. They have a forehead that is bright red, and their cheeks are bright green. Their wing backs will have a short red bar on them.

They are a nomadic bird and will form large groups when migratingThe female will lay 3 to 4 eggs in tree holes. The eggs hatch in 28 days. When the babies are 9 weeks old, they will leave the nest. They are popular pets, and many are captured for the pet trade. They are also losing their habitat. They are endangered. It is believed there are 3,000 to 6,500 of them left in the wild.


The Hispaniolan Amazon Parrot

By Yolanda M Leon Public Domain
By Yolanda M Leon Public Domain | Source

The Hispaniolan Amazon is found in Haiti and Dominican Republic also called Hispaniola. They are also living in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

They like to live in forest areas of Haiti and the Dominican Republic where they have a good supply of food. They also like to live in moist montane forests and plantations. The Hispaniolan Amazon is very popular as pets in the Dominican Republic.

The Hispaniolan Amazon is green and most of their feathers have blue edges. They have white around their eyes and their forehead is white. Their cheeks and crown have patches of blue on them. They have black ear coverts and their abdomen has red on it. Their wing coverts are blue. Under their tail is yellowish green. Their upper tail is green with a yellow tip. The base of their tail feathers is red. Their body is 28cm long the they weigh 250g.

They are declining in the wild because they are losing habitat. They are slow hunted and trapped. They have become endangered in the wild.


The Red-lored Amazon Parrot

By Tom Eppenberger CC By-SA 2.0
By Tom Eppenberger CC By-SA 2.0 | Source

The Red-lored Amazon's scientific name is Amazona autumnalis.

The Red-lored Amazon is found in Mexico, Central America and South America. They like humid evergreen forests up to 1,000m altitude. They are threatened because they are losing habitat and they are also captured for the pet trade in large numbers because they are very popular as pets. They make excellent pets.

The Red-lored Amazon's body is 32 to 35cm long, and they weigh 310 to 480g. Their body is mainly green, and their forehead is red. They will have a blue crown.

Their diet usually consists of Fruits, nuts and seeds.

They will use cavities in trees for their nest. The female will lay 3 to 4 eggs, and she will sit on them until they hatch.


The Saint Vincent Amazon Parrot

By Beralpo CC BY 2.5
By Beralpo CC BY 2.5 | Source

You will find the Saint Vincent Amazon living on Saint Vincent in the Caribbean. They live in the mountains that have dense forests.

They are 16 inches long. Their body is mainly green. Their head is yellowish white, blue and green. Their belly is greenish bronze, and their feet are gray. Their wings are a beautiful violet blue-green. They have a blue with yellow tips tail.

The Saint Vincent Amazon likes to eat fruits, nuts, flowers and seeds.

They are considered very vulnerable. They are hunted for food. They are in great demand for pets, so many of them are captured for the pet trade. They are losing their habitat to agriculture. They are losing their nesting trees because poachers cut them down to get the young birds to sell.

There are conservation projects to save the Saint Vincent Amazon, but they are not working very well.


The White-fronted Amazon Parrot

By Joseph C Boone CC BY-SA 4.0
By Joseph C Boone CC BY-SA 4.0 | Source

The white-fronted Amazon is found in Central America and Mexico. They like to live in rain forest and cactus savannas. They are found in small groups of about 20 birds.

They are not afraid of people. There is a small group of feral white-fronted Amazons that live in Southern California. It is believed they were once kept as pets and escaped or were turned loose.

The white-fronted Amazon can imitate 30 to 40 different sounds. When kept as pets, they can become very good talkers.

They are 10 inches long and are the smallest Amazon species. Their forehead has a patch of white feathers with blue feathers behind it. They have a green body, and when their wings are spread, they are blue. The male's shoulders have bright red feathers on the. The female's shoulders have green feathers on them.

They like to nest in tree cavities. The female lays 3 to 4 eggs, and they will hatch in 26 days. When the babies are 60 days old they will leave the nest.



The Yellow-billed Amazon Parrot

By Wayne Sutherland
By Wayne Sutherland | Source

The Yellow-billed Amazon is also called the Jamaican Amazon. They will be found in areas up to 1,200m elevation in Jamaica. They are found in mountain areas, but when it is breeding season they will be found in the rain forests. They are also found in rural gardens. The are considered pest by some.

They are 11 inches long, and their body is mainly covered with green feathers. Their throat, upper breast and sides of their neck have pink feathers on them. Their large wing feathers are blue. They have dark blue-green feathers over their ears. The feathers on their lore and crown front are pale blue to blue. The green feathers on their neck have black tips their green tail feathers have red bases. They have a yellow beak and pink legs.

They are considered vulnerable. The trees are being cut down, and they are losing their nesting sites. The Yellow-billed Amazon is also captured for the pet trade.



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Comments 4 comments

aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 5 months ago from Stillwater, OK

I either read The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill, so it is nice to put a nice photo with the story. The St.Vincent Amazon Parrot is certainly a knockout, and I enjoyed learning about them through this story. Too many of these beautiful birds are being destroyed for their cash flow.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 5 months ago from California Author

Thank you for comment. To many parrots are destroyed. Many people get them and find out they need a lot of room, attention and they are messy and they no longer want them. I have two cockatiels. They are great. One is 12 years old and one is 14.


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 5 months ago from Stillwater, OK

There was a cockatiel outdoors discovered by a neighbor last summer. Her mother tried to capture it, but instead, frightened it away. I'm not sure if it was let loose by someone or just escaped, but I cannot imagine that it would survive long.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 5 months ago from California Author

They will get out if they can. I have one that gets on gate when I feed and water him. He is an angle and just gets back into his cage when I am finished. I do not think they will survive in the wild after being kept as pets. There are some escaped parrots that have done just fine in the wild. There are Quaker parrots that are considered pests living in some eastern states.

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