Beautiful Shorebirds from Australia

Curlew Sandpiper

Curlew Sandpiper By J J Harrison CC BY-SA 3.0
Curlew Sandpiper By J J Harrison CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

In the summer, the Curlew Sandpiper migrates to Australia from Siberia and Alaska. They are also found in Africa, Asia, Indonesia, New Guinea and New Zealand. They are found in mudflats, lagoons, mangroves, beaches, rocky shores, lakes, and dams. Their breeding area is in Siberia and Alaska.

The Curlew Sandpiper has a bill that is black and curves down. Their legs and feet are black. Their non-breeding feathers are duller. Their upper body is grey-brown, and their belly is white. When they are flying, you can see their white wing bar. When they have their breeding feathers, their lower body is bright reddish brown, and they have black bars on their wings. They are 16 to 23cm long.


Curlew Sandpiper By Charlesjsharp CC BY-SA 4.0
Curlew Sandpiper By Charlesjsharp CC BY-SA 4.0 | Source

The Curlew Sandpiper will eat insects and insect larvae while breeding season. At other times, they eat small marine invertebrates. They especially like polychaete worms.

The Curlew Sandpiper will breed in the summer in Siberia and Alaska. The female Curlew Sandpiper builds her nest, sits on the eggs and cares for the babies with no help from the male.

The Curlew Sandpiper is threatened because their habitat is being developed.





Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy Turnstone By shrickant ran CC BY-SA 2.0
Ruddy Turnstone By shrickant ran CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The Ruddy Turnstone's scientific name is Arenarie interpres.

You will find the Ruddy Turnstone along the Australian coast and off-shore islands. They are also found along the coasts all over the world. You will find them living in groups or alone along the coast. They like exposed rocks and reefs. They also like shallow pools and beaches.


Ruddy Turnstone By Andy Reago and Christy McClarren CC BY-SA 2.0
Ruddy Turnstone By Andy Reago and Christy McClarren CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The Ruddy Turnstone is a wader that has short legs that are orange-red. They have a breast that is marked with black or brown, and it has pale colored areas. Their brown back will become a reddish-brown when it is breeding season. They are 22 to 24cm long and will weigh 115g.

When it is breeding season, the Ruddy Turnstone will go to the northern coasts of Europe, Asia and North America. They will build their nest on rocky island shores. The female will build a nest without any help from the male. She uses a dip in the ground and lines it with leaves. The nest is usually in a sheltered area. The babies will move around right after they hatch.

The eat insects, crustaceans, molluscs, spiders, eggs and carrion. The Ruddy Turnstone will look for food during the day and at night. They will look for food in crack in the ground.



Australian Painted Snipe

Australian Painted Snipe By Aviceda CC BY-SA 3.0
Australian Painted Snipe By Aviceda CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

The Australian Painted Snipe's scientific name is Rostratula australis.

The Australian Painted Snipe is usually found along the coast of Australia. The Australian Painted Snipe likes to live on the shallow freshwater wetlands along the coast. They can also be found inland on freshwater wetlands. They have been seen in sewage ponds and waterlogged grasslands.

The female Australian Painted Snipe is more colorful than the male. The female has a black throat, neck and head. Their crown has a pale stripe on it and their breast is pale colored. They have a metallic green back and wings. They have black, bronze and chestnut barring. They have blue-green legs. The Australian Painted Snipe is 22 to 26cm long, and they weigh 127g.

The Australian Painted Snipe likes to look for food at night. They will hunt in mudflats and areas with shallow water. They will eat worms, snails, water beetles and seeds.

The Australian Painted Snipe will look for grass tussocks and reeds for their nesting area which is a scrape in the ground. They will use grass and leaves to line their nest. They often nest in nearby islands. The female Australian Painted Snipe will lay her eggs, and she will leave to mate again. The male is left to incubate the eggs and care for the young.

They are losing habitat to cattle grazing and agriculture. They are preyed on by cats and foxes. They are now considered in endangered in New South Wales.


Red-capped Plover

Red-capped Plover J J Harrison CC BY-SA 3.0
Red-capped Plover J J Harrison CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

The Red-capped Plover's scientific name is Charadrius ruficapillus.

You will find the Red-capped Plover living all over Australia. They like to live in wetlands and arid areas. They prefer to live where the water is saline or brackish.

The Red-capped Plover has a crown and nape that are a reddish chestnut color. Their mantle is grey brown. They have black legs and bill. When they are flying their wing bar and outer tail are white. They are 14 to 16cm long and their wingspan is 27 to 34cm. They will weigh 35 to 40g.


Red-capped Plover female By J J Harrison CC BY-SA 3.0
Red-capped Plover female By J J Harrison CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

The Red-capped Plover will eat molluscs, crustaceans and plants. They will hunt for food on mudflats, sandy beaches and salt-marshes.

Their nest is a scrap that is shallow on the beach or in a stoney area that is close to water. The nest is usually protected by plants.

The nests that are built in the sand or pebble areas are damaged by fisherman and off-road vehicles. They are not considered threatened at this time.




Banded Lapwing

Banded Lapwing By Jim Bendon CC BY-SA 2.0
Banded Lapwing By Jim Bendon CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The Banded Lapwing's scientific name is Valueless tricolor.

You will only find the Banded Lapwing living in Australia and Tasmania. They like to live in open grasslands, agriculture fields and herb-lands. They like areas that are dry and semi-arid.

The Banded Lapwing is a large bird that has a broad breast band that is black, and their throat is white. They have a gray-brown upper body, and their belly is white. They have a cap that is black, and they have an eye-stripe that is broad and white. They have an eye-ring that is yellow. Their bill is yellow and has a red wattle on it. They are 25 to 29cm long and weigh 190g.



Banned Lapwing By Jim Bendon CC BY-SA 2.0
Banned Lapwing By Jim Bendon CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The Banded Lapwing will eat insects and when it is dry they will eat seeds. They like to search for insects, worms, spiders, snails and slugs in the short grass.

It has to rain before the Banded Lapwing will breed. They use a scrape in the ground for a nest. They will line it with dry grass and occasionally sheep droppings. The parents will both defend their nest and young. They will attack animals and humans that get too close.




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Comments 12 comments

FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 3 months ago from USA

Beautiful birds I've never seen. Thank you for presenting this information and the photos. It's sad that their habitat is disappearing.


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 3 months ago from Victoria, Australia

I love the busy little sandpipers with their pipping sounds as they run along the beach looking for tidbits. Where does the bush stone curlew fit in? He seems to like to be near the sea, too, and I just loved watching the way they spread their wings when they danced at dusk when I lived in Qld.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 3 months ago from California Author

Thanks FlouishAnyway. I appreciate your comment


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 3 months ago from California Author

Thanks BlossomSB I appreciate it. I will check out the bush stone curlew. They are neat.


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 3 months ago from sunny Florida

Wow...it is difficult for me to choose one that is my favorite. I love bird watching and while I am not an expert by any means at identifying them, they hold me transfixed with their beauty and the antics I am privy to.

Well done.

Angels are on the way to you this morning ps shared


Jodah profile image

Jodah 3 months ago from Queensland Australia

A great collection of shorebirds, Norma. Though I live in Australia the only one of these I have seen is the curlew sandpiper. That is probably because I don't live near the coast. Good information and photos.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 3 months ago

Norma, thank you for this beautiful hub. The pictures are fascinating, I love bird watching, and learning about their way of life.

Blessings and have a beautiful day.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 3 months ago from California Author

Thank you pstraubie 48 for your comment. Birds are neat to watch. Glad you liked the article.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 3 months ago from California Author

Thank you pstraubie 48 for your comment. Birds are neat to watch. Glad you liked the article.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 3 months ago from California Author

Thank you Jodah for your comment. You are lucky because Australia has many neat birds of all types. There are not many where I live.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 3 months ago from California Author

Thank you Jodah for your comment. You are lucky because Australia has many neat birds of all types. There are not many where I live.


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 3 months ago from California Author

Thank you Shyron for your comment. Glad you enjoyed the pictures.

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