Birds From Around the World

Regent Bowerbird

Male Regent Bowerbird By Seabamenum CC BY-SA 2.0
Male Regent Bowerbird By Seabamenum CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The Regent Bowerbird's scientific name is Sericulus chrysocephalus.

The Regent bowerbird is found in Queensland and New South Wales. The Regent Bowerbird likes to live in the rainforest and gullies that have a lot of trees.

The Regent bowerbird's bill is long, straight and slender. The male's back is a glossy jet black and their head, nape and wings have bright gold on the. The male has a yellow bill and eyes. The Regent Bowerbird is 25 to 30cm long and will weigh 100g. The female regent Bowerbird is not as bright colored as the male, in fact, she is very plain looking.

Their diet consists mainly of fruit they find in the canopy and upper layer of the forest. They will also eat insects.


Regent Bowerbird Femal B Glen Fergus CC BY-SA 2.0
Regent Bowerbird Femal B Glen Fergus CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The male Regent Bowerbird will build and maintain a bower where he will mate with more than one female. The males bower is a small open “avenue type” structure which has no top. It is 15cm to 20cm long and 30cm high and is made of twigs. The female Regent Bowerbird will build the nest out of twigs and leaves. She often puts it on a patch of mistletoe. The nest usually is not near the male’s bower. The female Regent Bowerbird will sit on the eggs for 25 days, and she will care for the babies.



Striated Thornbill

Striated Thornbill By Francesco Vermesi CC BY-SA 2.0
Striated Thornbill By Francesco Vermesi CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The Striated Thornbill is only found in Australia. They like to live in open forests and woodlands. Their favorite area is eucalyptus trees. The Striated Thornbill is also found in parks, gardens and agricultural areas.

The Striated Thornbill's upper body is a greenish color. They have a cap that is orange-brown. Their lower body is streaked with white or cream. Their chin, throat and breast is streaked. They are 9 to 10cm long and weigh 7g.



Striated Thornbill By gailhampshire CC BY-SA 2.0
Striated Thornbill By gailhampshire CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

They will eat insects, seeds, nectar and fruit. They form small groups when looking for food. They usually look for food in trees, but sometimes on the ground.

The male and female will build a domed nest that is oval shaped with an entrance near the top. They use bark mixed with lichen, moss, spider webs and egg sacs to build their nest. The female Striated Thornbill will lay 2 to 4 eggs and sit on them until they hatch in 17 days The male Striated Thornbill will help her feed the babies.

They are losing habitat to logging, but they are not considered endangered.




Antbird

Antbird By Mdf CC BY-SA 3.0
Antbird By Mdf CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

The Antbird will feed, breed and defend their territory during the day and rest at night.

They are usually small birds. They are usually gray, white, brown and Rufous in color. Their feathers can be barred or have spots. They have large, heavy beaks.

They usually eat insects, including crickets, cockroaches, grasshoppers, stick insects, praying mantis and butterfly and moth larvae. The Antbird species that are larger will also eat frogs and lizards. They will on occasion eat eggs, slugs, and fruit.


Antbird By Matt Deres CC BY-SA 3.0
Antbird By Matt Deres CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

The Antbird mates for life. The female will lay 2 eggs in a nest suspended from branches or built on a branch, stump or mound of dirt. When the babies fledge the male will take care of one and the female will take care of the other one. This is very unusual. The male and female sit on the eggs and feed the babies.

There are 40 Antbird subspecies that are threatened. This is because of hunting and the pet trade. Their biggest threat is the destruction of their habitat. They are now trying to protect the Antbird from extinction.

Bassian Thrush

Bassian Thrush By JJ Harrison CC BY-SA 3.0
Bassian Thrush By JJ Harrison CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

You will find the Bassian Thrush living in Australia and parts of Queensland. They like forested areas and gullies that are damp and dense. They also like a canopy that is dense and leaf litter on the ground.

They are a very shy bird. Their upper body is covered with mottled olive-brown to brown feathers that are scalloped in black and their head, rump and back have crescent-shaped bars on them. Their underparts are paler and have brown-black scallops. They have a white ring around their eyes. They are 27cm long and weigh 100g.

They will look for food on the ground. They will scratch in the leaf litter looking for food.

Their nests are large, deep and cup shaped. The will put their nest in a large tree fork or a lower spot of a stump. They will build their nest near the ground or 15m off the ground. The female will lay 2 to 3 eggs and they are incubated for 14 days. Both parents care for the chicks.




Black-fronted Dotterel

Black-fronted Dotterel By J J Harrison CC BY-SA 3.0
Black-fronted Dotterel By J J Harrison CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

The Black-fronted Dotterel's scientific name is Elseyomis melanops.

You will find the Black-footed Dotterel living all over Australia. They like to live along wetlands, lakes, rivers, sewage farms, storm drains and marshes. They like freshwater and will never go to the coast.

They will eat mollusks, aquatic insects, and land insects.


Black-fronted Dotterel By Graname CC BY-SA 3.0
Black-fronted Dotterel By Graname CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

The female lays her eggs in a scrape in the ground. They like ground with pebbles on it and is near water. The male and female will both sit on the eggs and take care of the babies.

They are not considered threatened in Australia. They are losing breeding sites which may lower their numbers in the future.


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Comments 4 comments

Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 4 months ago from England

Hi, it never fails to amaze me the different types of birds around the world. I learn about one, then a few more come along! lol! this was fascinating! I have Red Kites birds of prey living in the tree near my house and boy do they make a heck of a noise! I feed them chicken and they swoop down past my head with a wingspan of over 6ft! great read!


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 4 months ago from California Author

Thank you for comment. I do not get many or views so really appreciate it when someone reads my article and comments. Thank you again


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 4 months ago from Victoria, Australia

Another interesting article on Aussie birds - of the feathered kind! Love it!


norlawrence profile image

norlawrence 4 months ago from California Author

Thanks for comment.

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