Breeding and Raising Crickets

Breeding Crickets the Easy Way

Crickets are the number one feeder insect for reptile and amphibian owners. They are nutritious, readily available and easy to care for. If you have alot of hungry pets you may want to breed your own. It can be fun and rewarding. You may also end up with so many crickets that you could sell some to make a little extra money. Outlined below is a simple method to grow a few hundred crickets.

Start with a medium sized critter keeper or 2 1/2 gallon glass tank. Place an old margerine tub or small tupperware cantainer filled with moist coco fiber at one end of the tank (this is where the females will lay their eggs). At the other end of the tank place a shallow dish filled with cricket gutload (like flukers mix), and another shallow dish (a jar lid works) filled with water and cotton swabs. In the middle place toilet paper tubes and egg carton for the crickets to crawl on. Make sure the crickets can crawl into the coco fiber-filled container. For heat place a small undertank heater under the end of the tank where the egg-laying container is). Now purchase 30 large crickets from the pet shop. This should give you a good mix of males and females. Males have two prongs coming from their abdomen. Females have three (the middle long one is the ovipositor). Place the crickets in the cage. Within no time they will get down to business.

After 5 days the egg-laying container should be full of eggs (females lay 5-10 a day). Remove the adults and feed them to your animals- they've served thier purpose. Remove the food and water from the tank so it will not spoil. Leave everything else just the way it is. Keep the coco-fiber moist but not wet with regular misting. In 10-14 days you will baby crickets (be advised they won't all hatch the same day). Now add fesh food and water, and care for them as you would adults. When all the crickets have hatched remove the coco fiber. Crickets will grow fast if kept warm- From pinhead to 1/2 inch in a few weeks. For more information on this and other reptile and amphibian topics visit the link below. 

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