Chicken Behavior Video, Dirt baths, Pecking order and Molting

The Weird World of Egg Laying Hens

Unless you have them, chickens can be a real mystery to the average person. They can be moody, emotional, friendly, productive, angry, and most of time just plain fun. If you watch these protein producing dynamos for any length of time, you will discover their world is a weird, yet very practical place to live; as long as you don't mind a few Chicken Dirt Baths, the Pecking Order, and of course Plumage Molting, that is!

A Hen Starting a dirt bath hole.
A Hen Starting a dirt bath hole. | Source

Why Chickens Roll in the Dirt

Chicken Dirt Baths

The Reason Chickens Roll in the dirt are many. Who would think that a dirt bath could help with good hygiene? Well, chickens know all about it. They roll and fluff the dirt under their feathers to keep bugs and other critter off of their skin. When the dirt gets trapped between the feathers, it has a bonus result; cooling. The dirt create gaps so the air can get to the chickens skin and therefore cool the flesh, keeping the bird from over heating.

They start this process by digging out a hole in the ground. They do this by using their strong feet and claws, and then when the hole fits just right, they will settle down inside the new space. This is when the chicken will begin to fluff both wings to agitate the soil, forcing the dirt between the plumage. They also use their beaks to pull the dirt around and under them from the surrounding sides of the hole they just created. This keeps more soil available for the next round of fluffing and digging.

Only the best chickens get to reproduce in nature.
Only the best chickens get to reproduce in nature. | Source
Hens throw out their chest and get tall when proving they belong at the top of the pecking order.
Hens throw out their chest and get tall when proving they belong at the top of the pecking order. | Source

What is Pecking Order

It Really is a "Pecking" Order

When you hear the comment "pecking order" it's clear that it is a form of hierarchy, a ranking system within any given society. The term is derived from our poultry pals. A ranking chicken (hen or rooster) will literally peck a lower ranking bird to show it is dominant. It seems to be a very effective method of managing the flock. Not many upheavals occur, and it is clear among the flock who is in charge. Rank has its privileges among chickens just like in human society or the military. The top hens eat first, get the best place in the house to sleep, and have first grabs at the best looking hens/roosters. This pecking order is vital to produce generation after generation of the best quality birds. It provides that big, healthy, smart, and durable birds propagate their species.

Before and After Feather Molting [Click to See Full Size]

During molting, a hen drops feathers so new plumage can grow in.
During molting, a hen drops feathers so new plumage can grow in. | Source

Feather Molting in Hens

Molting is a Tough Process for a Bird

Every year or so chickens will go through a process called "molting" wherein their entire array of plumage falls or gets plucked out, and then new fresh iridescent feathers grow in their place. The birds look just aweful during the replacemnet time, and take on a very homely or hobo looking appearance. Straggling feathers and bare spot are everywhere...it is not a time of the year for a hen to go to a fancy ball! Molting is pretty hard on a bird, it takes a ton of protein to make new feathers, so egg production will generally come to a hault during this time.

The nutritional needs of the flock change during molting, we often give canned tuna fish to them to help boost the protein. Milk, cottage cheese, and even protein supplements from the vet can be given to help with molting. The birds will get a little neurotic and unlike themselves for most of this event. They seem to almost overnight become themselves after the molting is over. No matter what difficulty the flock endures during molting, know that this is NOT a good look on chicken!

Hen Line-up
Hen Line-up | Source

Chicken Behavior

Our backyard flock has been a joy to manage for more than a year now. Watching the dirt baths, pecking order, and even the ugliness of molting, has helped us understand our hens. This year we will know what to expect from our chickens. From egg production to molting, hens are a fascinating first hand education in bird behavior that I wouldn't trade for the world.

Chickens

Have you ever raised chickens for eggs?

  • Nope. Eggs come from the store.
  • Yes. It was work, but the farm fresh eggs were great!
  • No. But I think I might try it.
  • Yep. I am raising them right now!
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Comments for "Chicken Behavior, Dirt baths, Pecking order and Molting [video]" 11 comments

Gordon Hamilton profile image

Gordon Hamilton 4 years ago from Wishaw, Lanarkshire, United Kingdom

K9, my friend - I love it. You are a natural with the video camera and the subject takes me back to my childhood. You are a natural for handling potentially sensitive subjects to perfection.


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 4 years ago from Northern, California Author

Simone~ thanks for making it by and sharing your thoughts on a few chicken tips. Nothing like fresh eggs!

HubHugs~

K9


Simone Smith profile image

Simone Smith 4 years ago from San Francisco

Ooooh! I would love to have some egg laying chickens someday! I've always enjoyed fresh eggs, and I have also gotten a kick out of caring for chickens, too. Sigh... someday! At least now I know a lot more about their behavior!


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 4 years ago from Northern, California Author

tlpoague~ Wow! I bet that was a surprise when the little chickens dominated those big turkey's, I would have never guessed! Glad we stuck with only hens, or I imagine we might well have done the same thing. I sure appreciate that you shared your know-how here. Thanks for your comments! Always nice to see you made it by.

HubHugs~

K9


tlpoague profile image

tlpoague 4 years ago from USA

I tried to raise chickens one year. It was an interesting experience. I found out very quickly that you do not want to put chickens in the same pen as the turkeys. The turkey is more timid than the chicken and the chicken will run them off. I learned a lot of things that year. Great hub! I loved the video!

~Hub Hugs!


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 4 years ago from Northern, California Author

MazioCreate~ I am so happy that you decided to raise your own backyard flock! The eggs are simply yummy! Hens can be noisy during egg laying, so make sure you place them where they won't bother your neighbors with their cackling. And always share the eggs with family, friends and your neighbors!

Thanks for sharing your story. I love to read this stuff.

Cheers~

K9


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 4 years ago from Northern, California Author

wordscribe43~ You are so smart! Gathering the eggs at the home you are sitting is an outstanding bonus to watching the flock! Nothing taste like farm fresh eggs, and they are just amazing in baked goods. Your friend is right, natural eggs are MUCH better for us than store bought production eggs. I read a great hub on the topic a while ago! I appreciate that you shared your thoughts here!

HubHugs~

K9


K9keystrokes profile image

K9keystrokes 4 years ago from Northern, California Author

Cat~ Thanks for the votes! I am glad you found our chickens to your liking!

Cheers~

K9


MazioCreate profile image

MazioCreate 4 years ago from Brisbane Queensland Australia

K9keystrokes you hit on a great topic for a Hub. We've been talking about getting a few chickens and this Hub has tipped the scales into doing it sooner rather than later. Thanks!


wordscribe43 profile image

wordscribe43 4 years ago from Pacific Northwest, USA

I always take care of my friend's chickens when they leave town and they are so funny! Not to mention, we get all the eggs they lay in their absence and they're quite yummy. My friend was telling me these eggs are healthier than the kind you get in the store: less cholesterol and fat. Great hub!


cat on a soapbox profile image

cat on a soapbox 4 years ago from Los Angeles

Great hub! Voted up, useful, and interesting. Thanks!

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