Diary of a Cackleberry Farmer (August 2015 Edition)

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Welcome Back

Welcome back to the Cackleberry Farm and this, the second installment. I was planning on waiting for a month to pass since publishing the initial Cackleberry Farm hub to make sure that there was enough new happenings to create a hub around. However, today there was just such an occurrence to warrant bringing it forward, and as it is a new month I decided to call this the "August Edition."

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Basil plants flowering
Basil plants flowering | Source

Winter Weather

(I wrote the following paragraph a few days ago as a filler to help this hub make an acceptable word count. This was before the most recent "notable event" so I have since considered deleting it. Then I thought why not just leave it in, it is just one paragraph.)

The winter weather here in Ballogie has been generally cool with only three of four really cold days in the last two weeks. It hasn't rained since May either, so the grass is brown and brittle and I've been watering the garden, with grey water from the shower, every second day.

Hatching Pen
Hatching Pen | Source
Hen using a grass catcher as a nesting box
Hen using a grass catcher as a nesting box | Source
The Hatching Pen
The Hatching Pen | Source

Clucky Hens

Shortly after writing the first hub in the series I came across one clucky hen hiding in among the bromeliads and sitting on a nest containing 14 eggs (not bad for a tiny bantam hen). I subsequently relocated her (under severe aggressive pecking) and the cackleberries into the hatching pen (an ex-trailer cage) to protect them from both predators and the weather.

After an hour or two of squawking and flapping the hen finally settled back down on top of the eggs. This was a relief as they needed to be kept warm if they were ever going to hatch. The incubation period for eggs hatching naturally is usually 21 days. The fact that there are 14 eggs under her doesn't mean that the hen has already been sitting for two weeks because it is likely other hens laid in the same nest and she gathered all the eggs up together. That being the case, it has been a couple of weeks since I found her so I'm expecting the chicks to start hatching anytime soon.

Yesterday, when I went on a cackleberry hunt, I found a hen still sitting on the nest. Thinking she still needed time to lay her egg I decided to leave her and check again in the morning. Well this morning when I checked, she is still nesting so it appears she may have gone clucky too. If she hasn't moved by nightfall I will scoop her and any eggs up in a grass catcher and move them into the nesting cage with the other clucky hen.

The bird feeder outside our bedroom window. The king parrots have just flown away :)
The bird feeder outside our bedroom window. The king parrots have just flown away :) | Source
King parrot
King parrot
Butcher birds
Butcher birds
Magpies lining up for their turn at the dog food
Magpies lining up for their turn at the dog food | Source

Wild Birds

Kathy and I wake up most mornings to either King Parrots or Red Wings chattering on the bird feeder that hangs outside our bedroom window. Often when we move suddenly they will fly up into the nearby Macadamia nut tree to hide before returning in a few minutes when they are sure there is no danger.

They are becoming tamer all the time however and one day there was a Red Wing that was so tame it climbed onto my hand off the roof over the cob oven and the next day actually came into the kitchen and was perched on the back of a chair.

The other wild birds that frequent every day are the butcher birds, magpies, and noisy mynas and currawongs. As I mentioned in the first article, these eagerly watch in wait until the dogs and cats are fed each afternoon at precisely 4.00pm before swooping down to feast on any left over pet food. God help me if I am late feeding the animals.. the wild birds let me know about it.

Their numbers seem to be increasing every day and today I counted ten noisy mynas, six magpies and four butcher birds. These were darting back and forth in turn from the electricity wire to the wire fencing around the verandah, even as the dogs and cats were still eating. Currawongs usually come around earlier in the day and prefer the left over chicken seed left behind by the poultry.

I don't really begrudge the wild birds the left-overs because it is winter and natural food such as insect and lizards is scarce. At least it' also too cold for snakes to be active so I don't have to worry about encountering pythons in the lounge room for a few more months (I previously said I wan't going to keep discussing the weather...oh well.) I also make sure that the bird bath is full of clean water so they always have easy access for drinking. I read recently that lack of water is the main cause of death among wild birds.

Today we also had the added pleasure of a visit by a small flock of rainbow lorikeets or rosellas that found some uneaten chicken seed on the ground.

Rainbow Lorrikeets feeding
Rainbow Lorrikeets feeding | Source
Freshly picked Sage
Freshly picked Sage | Source
Fresh Parsley
Fresh Parsley | Source
Bottles of Herbs in the pantry
Bottles of Herbs in the pantry | Source
Food Dryer/Dehydrator
Food Dryer/Dehydrator | Source

Drying Herbs

Being a cackleberry farmer is not all collecting eggs and feeding chickens and animals (Oh, did I mention writing hubs?) Sometimes we actually have to spend time in the garden, either planting or picking herbs, fruit and vegetables.. and it doesn't stop there! In order to make the most of what we grow and waste as little as possible we also dry a good proportion of our herbs.

Just the other day I was busy harvesting parsley, basil, and sage for drying in our food dehydrator. Then I just had to pluck the leaves from the sage and basil and pull the parsley apart and spread out on the mesh shelves of the dehydrator. Turn it on and leave overnight. In the morning "voila" .. Perfectly dried herbs. Place it in bottles in the pantry and it will keep indefinately for when you need it. We also dry fruit such as apple, banana, pear, strawberries, pineapple, and tomato, and vegetables such as beetroot, ginger, and onion.

Hen nesting beneath the asparagus fern.
Hen nesting beneath the asparagus fern. | Source
One of the newborn chicks.
One of the newborn chicks. | Source

Don't Count Your Chickens Before They Hatch

In the earlier chapter on "clucky hens" I mentioned a hen that I suspected may have gone clucky and that if she hadn't moved by nightfall then I would relocate her and any eggs to the hatching pen.

Well, my suspicions were correct so I prepared a grass catcher nesting box by lining it with clean straw, then crawled under the asparagus fern and between the aloe vera to access her nest. A few scratches later I had her and one lone egg in the catcher and moved to the pen without any dramas. The beauty of dealing with chooks at night time is that they are always calm and inactive and are easily managed.

Oh, at the start of the article I mentioned a special occurrence that convinced me to publish the hub now instead of waiting another couple of weeks. When I opened up the gate of the hatching pen to add it's new resident something caught my attention. I heard a faint "cheep cheep." On checking the nesting box I was met by a pleasant surprise. Two small yellow chicks had just hatched. Even though it was almost dark the mother hen wasn't impressed with me trying to look underneath her, but it appears that only two eggs have hatched at this stage. Hopefully by morning there will be a few more arrivals. So we now have ten chooks and the number is hopefully still growing.

The other newborn.
The other newborn. | Source

Hatching Update

Just to keep my readers updated: This morning when I checked the hatching pen I found the hen was no longer sitting on the eggs but running around her were six tiny chicks, three yellow, three grey and white. That will be the final number. I have added a couple more pics of the new babies.

Thanks for reading.

New Chicks
New Chicks | Source
If you look hard you can see six.
If you look hard you can see six. | Source

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Comments 71 comments

billybuc profile image

billybuc 17 months ago from Olympia, WA

We have some chicks due to hatch soon. Can't wait. I love births.

Great installment of a series I hope is around a long time. I want your property. My imagination runs wild whenever I see pictures of your place.

Have a great day, John, and thanks for the tour.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for being the first to read and comment Bill. Yes I love the births too and it'll be interesting to ee how many hatch out of this lot. Good luck with your chicks too. There is till a lot more I want to do with the property, and maybe like you get some miniature goats, or pigs eventually. As long as I can keep coming up with new things to write I'll try to keep the series going. Thanks again.


word55 profile image

word55 17 months ago from Chicago

What a v Thanks for sharing!ery interesting life on the Cackleberry Farm. I bet there's not a dull moment. Keeping busy like that keeps you on your toes.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes it does word55, sometimes I feel as though I should be doing more though, but life is interesting. Thanks for reading. Glad you found this hub interesting.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 17 months ago from The Beautiful South

Great article John; these are my favorites. Love looking into your life! Thanks so much for sharing it! I just may have to get me a rooster for my three remaining hens!

^+


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 17 months ago from Southern Georgia

Hi John, as a retired farmer I enjoyed seeing your place and the different kinds of birds you have there. We farmed over 500 acres here in the deep south and I can attest to be educated by my experience. Many of my most productive hubs are how-to articles learned by hands-on experience around the farm.

I can identify with this hub although you may be far away from my area. Keep up the good work. :)


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Jackie, thanks for the kind comment. I'm glad you like my personal true stories. Hopefully thi series continues for awhile. Get yourself a rooster if your local laws allow. Then you can have the pleasure of having chicks hatch.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hey Randy, thanks for reading this. I appreciate your comment and glad you can relate from your own farm experiences. You certainy expand your all round knowledge when you live on the land.


Larry Rankin profile image

Larry Rankin 17 months ago from Oklahoma

Always interesting to learn about the peaks and valleys in the life of an Ausie farmer.


Dana Tate profile image

Dana Tate 17 months ago from LOS ANGELES

The life of a Farmer seems like a fun life. I'm not down-playing the hard work though, I'm sure the work is hard and rewarding. I love the fact that you grow your own herbs and vegetables, I have a relative who does that;and its so healthier. The beautiful birds (especially the King bird) reminded me of a beautiful pair of parakeets I had as a child. Loved this second edition. UIAB and shared.


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 17 months ago from Central Florida

Australia has such pretty birds! Your new babies are cute. Mom doesn't mind you handling them?

I have a question, John: how do you tell the difference between fertilized and unfertilized eggs? In other words, how do you know which ones you can eat?

Like Bill, I'm envious of your property. You definitely have a slice of Heaven on Earth!


MsDora profile image

MsDora 17 months ago from The Caribbean

I enjoyed moving around with you on your cackleberry farm. Interesting incidents and beautiful pictures. I also learned something; I was not aware that hens sat on eggs which came from other hens. Tell me more.


Missy Smith profile image

Missy Smith 17 months ago from Florida

I enjoyed reading this installment. I have to confess, the wild birds was my favorite part. I love birds!! The rainbow lorikeets are beautiful.

I have always wanted to grow and store my own herbs and spices, so that was so interesting to me.

The little chicks bring some memories back to me. I lived on a Farm when I was around 3 for a couple of years, and I remember loving our baby chicks. This was, as always, a delightful article to read.


Carb Diva profile image

Carb Diva 17 months ago

What a delightful hub! Rainbow Lorrikeets, king parrots, baby chicks, AND macadamia nuts. Are you living in Paradise?


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Larry, I guess I am a farmer, but on a very small scale. I appreciate you taking the the time to read this.


annart profile image

annart 17 months ago from SW England

I love reading things like this. It's fascinating and you have such wonderful birds visiting you. I love those rainbow lorikeets. I had the privilege of seeing some when I was in Imbil some years back.

It must be hard work on your land but I bet it's wonderfully rewarding. Thanks for sharing all of this with us, John.

Happy hatching!

Ann :)


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Dana, good to see you. We love the country life and would find it difficult living in the city now. The peace and quiet, slow pace and most of all the animals and wildlife (especially birds) would be sadly missed. Living on the land certainly has its challenges but it is more than worth it. Growing your own herbs and verges is also very satisfying. Thanks for the vote up.


whonunuwho profile image

whonunuwho 17 months ago from United States

Jodah, I really enjoyed this article and it was well written and the photos were outstanding. This was most enlightening about your countryside and quite beautiful. Thank you for this nice work my friend. whonu


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes we do have some beautiful birds Shauna. The mother hen does try to protect the babies and pecks me when I try to handle them, but you get used to that :) that's an interesting question, "how do you tell fertilized from unfertilised eggs?" Would have been a good one for Billybuc's mailbag :) Actually the best way is to not take eggs out from under a hen. If the eggs are sitting unattended for more than a few minutes they are usually infertile. If a hen is sitting on a nest of eggs she will also toss any infertile eggs out. How they tell the difference I have no idea. As long as the egg has only recently been laid however, it is fine to eat fertilized or not. Some hens just never go clucky (they have had the mothering instinct bred out of them) and they lay fertile eggs but don't sit on them. If I find an abandoned nest with a large number of eggs in it there's often no way of knowing how long they have been there. I place the eggs in water to see if they float. That's one way of finding out if they are good or not (if they float they are off)..but sometimes you still find bad eggs amongst them when you crack them. We are lucky to live where we do. Thanks for reading.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi MsDora, thanks for reading. Yes a clucky hen will adopt and sit on any eggs that have been laid within her reach. Sometimes a number of hens will lay in the same nest and if one hen suddenly goes clucky she will sit on them all. The others don't tend to stop laying there just because she's sitting so will just drop their eggs next to her and then move on. That's why our clucky bantam is trying to sit on 14 eggs (they don't all fit under her.) Seven of our current chooks come from one nest and they are all different colours and sizes and obviously laid by different hens.


cam8510 profile image

cam8510 17 months ago from Colorado Springs, CO until the end of March

John, like Bill, I really enjoy seeing your property. You are doing a lot of the things I hope to be doing not too far down the road. Congratulations on the new chooks. I hope the others come along soon with no problems. I'm enjoying these hubs very much.


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 17 months ago from Victoria, Australia

I'll look forward to seeing more photos of the new chickens as they hatch. Perhaps you could have more hubs in August as it seems as if spring has already come up your way. It's freezing down here, although the wattles are starting to look beautiful.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Missy, I love wild birds too. Hey, we don't even keep our chickens penned after they are big enough to fend for themselves. When you live in a place like this and have the pleasure of enjoying the company of so many wild birds you never want to put a bird in a cage again. Herbs are so easy to grow and a dehydrator (probably available on Amazon) makes drying them a breeze. Most of ours are just grown in pots outside our window so we can water them without even setting foot outside. Hopefully there will be more newly hatched chicks there this morning too.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes Carb Diva, sometimes I think this is Paradise. I actually wrote a hub about one of our trees dying and called it "Death in Paradise". Thanks for reading.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 17 months ago from Southern Illinois

I think it's wonderful how you take good care of all the birds and chickens. I'm an avid bird feeder. Hummingbirds are my favorite, but I feed others too. I also love to feed rabbits and a cute little squirrel who runs away when I try to give him candy. He returns when I go into the house. I love your pictures. Baby chicks are soo cute...Thank's for sharing with us my Aussy friend..


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hello Ruby, we don't have rabbits and squirrels unfortunately. I think I remember seeing a hummingbird here once. They are amazing. I'll probably include more "chick pics" :) when I get a chance. Have a great week.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

I'd love to see the birds that you do in my garden! This is another interesting and enjoyable hub. I'm looking forward to the next one in the series.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 17 months ago from southern USA

Oh, John, I love your Cackleberry Farmer series here, and this one is so interesting! Wow, I would love to have all the wild birds such as those you have showing up in my yard! The rainbow lorikeets are stunningly beautiful. I have never seen such birds before. This is why I love learning about the lives of fellow writers here as your everyday life is so different from mine with the different variety of birds and such. Do you cats try to eat them? I know my cat, George, would ... I am so happy about your new little chick, how sweet and what glorious photos you have shared. Your property is amazing. These are my favorite kinds of hubs.

Blessings Up ++++ and sharing everywhere


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you very much Alicia. Yes we have some lovely birds. I am glad you and other readers find this series appealing.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Ann, yes the birds are great. Imbil you say. That's a nice area too. I bought a caravan from there a few year back. I have been a little lazy lately as a matter of fact, but I have some major work to do on the property before the end of the year..just have to stop writing and do it :) Thanks for reading and commenting.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks whonu, glad you found this enlightening and enjoyed the photos. I appreciate your kind comment.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks Chris, I saw another two chicks poke their heads out this morning so that's currently four. there's still quite a few more eggs under the hen, so by tomorrow I shold know the final count. Glad you are enjoying the series. How did your first story for the contest go?


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Glad you like the chicken pic Blossom. I may take some more pics tomorrow as they should all be hatched by then (well as many as are going to). Weather has been quite warm for the last three day but they say a cold snap will return from tomorrow. Try to stay warm down there.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Theresa, I'm glad you enjoy this type of hub, and you are right it's a good view of life on the other side of the planet. Our cats generally don't worry about the birds, in fact the bird are sitting on the fence near the cats as they eat, waiting for their turn. Every now and then one of the female cats will catch a bird and eat it..usually a noisy minor..but that is rare. The male cats are too lazy..a bit like lions. Thanks for the lovely comment.


Buildreps profile image

Buildreps 17 months ago from Europe

Looks like you've an awesome place out there, Jodah! I like the way you crafted you Hub. How far are you living from the coast? And are the temperatures bearable in mid summer?


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Buildreps, yes it's not a bad place, about three hours drive to the coast unfortunately. Mid-summer temperatures range between about 35 to 42C, down to about 25C at night...bearable, just.


Ericdierker profile image

Ericdierker 17 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

What a wonderful, albeit brief, holiday I had escaping to your little slice of heavenly life. How marvelous our world of creatures is to behold. And how pleasant it is to have such a great writer to act as our storyteller guide. I look forward to visiting you again when you have time to spend regaling us in your special way.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Eric, thank you my friend for such an inspiring comment. Appreciation like that really makes one's time spent writing worthwhile. It took me a longtime to begin sharing my 'real life' in my writing but now I have found a way to do that and make it interesting for people to read. So glad you are enjoying this series.


drbj profile image

drbj 17 months ago from south Florida

I have never seen such amazing looking birds before as those in your photos, Jodah. So beautiful and colorful. Thanks for sharing those photos which are definitely a treat.

Do your cackleberries know how lucky they are to have you as a fond housefather?


ChitrangadaSharan profile image

ChitrangadaSharan 17 months ago from New Delhi, India

Great series, engaging and beautiful hub! You have some very interesting information and such lovely pictures of these colourful birds. It seems you are living at an awesome place and needless to say you are a great storyteller. I always enjoy going through your hubs.

Thanks and voted up!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you drbj. I tried to capture a photo of the King parrots and red wings when they were on the bird feeder outside the window but they were too camera shy whenever I tried to get close enough. The rainbow lorikeets were much tamer. Not sure what the cackleberries think, I haven't learnt to talk egg yet :)


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for your kind word and continued support Chitrangada. I am lucky to live in this place. I'm glad you enjoyed this and my other hubs. Thank you also for the vote up.


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 17 months ago from Shelton

I have to admit this Jodah, I love the little series you have started here.. and the photos.. just amazing.. nature.. nurture... goes hand and hand here voted informative and awesome :)


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you Frank, I am so happy this series is proving popular. It' great when you can write about your everyday life and have people enjoy reading it. Glad you are finding the series enjoyable and informative.


travmaj profile image

travmaj 17 months ago from australia

Hi John, I also agree with the comments, I like these everyday observations and can relate to many. We have King parrots calling most days along with a huge selection of parrots. Have to be careful about feeding though - we had those glorious Sulphur Crested cockatoo's who, when we were away, tucked into the window sills etc. What a mess. So I can't encourage them now, pity because they are fun. Forgot to say have no evidence if Steele and Kevin are related. Love Steele's work though. Unlikely combination. Cheers John


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Maj, thank for the great comment. Yes the sulphur-crested cockatoos can be damaging to any woodwork. Luckily our place is all besser brick or metal. We actually had a cockatoo outside our window this morning munching on macadamia nuts. Cheers.


mckbirdbks profile image

mckbirdbks 17 months ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

Hello John - You have quite the collection going on. Birds of all types and sizes to keep you feed, entertained with their songs and their beauty.

Here in California, gray water has become a topic of conversation because we are running out of water at an alarming pace.

Nice addition to the Cackleberry Diary.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Mike, thanks for the great comment. Yes we have quite a collection of birds and it seems to be growing all the time. Because I live in the world's driest continent we utilise grey water everyday, collecting water from the shower to use on the garden. We also have a greywater pump to divert it as well. We also only have tank water (rain barrels) where I live so have to catch all run off from the roof. I am coming over to visit your latest carriage driver hub soon.


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 17 months ago from Stillwater, OK

It sure looks like all is well on the chicken farm. It is always nice to see new life.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes indeedy Deb, all is going well at present. Jut hope the new chicks survive this cold snap we are currently experiencing. Thanks for reading.


Genna East profile image

Genna East 17 months ago from Massachusetts, USA

I will trade you one of your winter for ours, my friend. How beautiful...even with the browning due to the lack of rain. (We haven't had much, so have been watering at least twice a week this summer.) I feed wild birds and rabbits that visit our backyard..and make sure a large bowl is full of fresh water. But I must say that they can't match the stunning beauty in the rainbow of colors like your King Parrots and Lorrikeets. You are so caring of your brood of clucky hens and chooks, John. Those pics of the newborns are adorable.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Genna. You are right, we are lucky to have the mild winters that we do. I have never even seen snow so I don't really know what "old" is :) Yes those birds certainly are beautiful..mot of our parrot varieties are, and I try to care for my brood as best I can though unfortunately I found one of the newborn chicks dead in the cage this morning. That was sad, I hope we don't lose any more.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 17 months ago from California

I bet your chicks are running around by now--I love fresh herbs and should probably get a dehydrator as well


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 17 months ago from High desert of Nevada.

Life on the farm is a never-ending cycle of caring for the critters and plants. What a wonderful way to live. Hey, Jodah - congrats on the newborn chicks, which I guess are growing rapidly.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

The chicks are still caged Audrey, maybe for another week or two. Dehydrators are great..I recommend them.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thanks for reading this one too Phyllis. Yes, it is a never ending cycle. One chick died unfortunately but the others seem to be going strong and growing, though the mother i a bantam so they shouldn't be very big.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 17 months ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

I can tell you enjoy life on Cackleberry farm. I enjoyed the photos. It's very hot here but the hot days are limited and soon we will feel a welcomed autumn chill. It's interesting to compare the differences in seasons.


mary615 profile image

mary615 17 months ago from Florida

You make me miss my childhood of growing up on a farm! It's a lot of work keeping up with everything, but is certainly worth it.

I would enjoy seeing those beautiful birds. I don't think we have those here in Florida.

Australia is still on my bucket list!!


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes Rebecca, "farm livin' is the life for me" :) I do enjoy being a cackleberry farmer. Yes our seasonal differences are always a topic of conversation. I'm sure you are looking forward to autumn. Thanks for reading.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Mary, like our animals, most of our bird species are unique to Australia. We do have some strikingly beautiful parrots in particular..king parrots, red wings, rainbow lorikeets, cockatoos, galahs, rosellas etc etc. I hope you do make it down here one day. Glad this hub brought back childhood memories for you.


Shyron E Shenko profile image

Shyron E Shenko 17 months ago

John, thank you for this. I love birds and this brought back special memories of when Pampa (my grandpa) would bring a box full of chicks in the house and he would rig a light that gave off heat for them.

I miss the farm, but not the hard work.

Voted-thumb up, UABI and shared

Blessings and Hugs


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 17 months ago from North America

With all the chickens, the wild birds, and the macadamia nut tree, I would sit for days, just staring at them all. You live in a paradise and I am glad to see pictures of it all.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you Shyron, glad to bring back those childhood memories for you, I bet those were the days. I appreciate the vote up and share too. Hugs and blessings back.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Hi Patty, it is my little bit of paradise...maybe that's why I never seem to get anything done :) too much nature to look at. Thanks for reading and your kind words.


lawrence01 profile image

lawrence01 17 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

I now know what to do with my HP earnings, become a Cackleberry farmer!(okay, its going to take a few decades but we all need a dream :))

Loved the hub

Lawrence


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Yes Lawrence my HP earnings pay for a bag of poultry food every so often. Glad you enjoyed the hub.


lawrence01 profile image

lawrence01 17 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

Even that is a help with 'living the dream' especially now there are more to feed!

Years ago we jokingly suggested to my wife's mun that we were considering buying an egg farm, it's the only time I can recall her ever using swear words at us!

Lawrence


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

So, she didn't like the idea of an egg farm I take it :)


lawrence01 profile image

lawrence01 17 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

Not really! She apparently grew up on one and didn't appreciate the reminder :)

We laughed about it after


shprd74 profile image

shprd74 17 months ago from Bangalore

As i read this article, It felt like being there. watching the daily coarse of activities and actions.

Thanks for sharing jodah, enjoyed it throughly.

- Hari


Jodah profile image

Jodah 17 months ago from Queensland Australia Author

Thank you for reading Hari.. glad I made you feel part of it.

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