Facts about American Black Vultures

A group of American black vultures perched on metal railings.  These birds are gregarious and love to roost in big groups.  They also love to feed as a group and will attempt to drive away more solitary animals, such as turkey vultures, if they can.
A group of American black vultures perched on metal railings. These birds are gregarious and love to roost in big groups. They also love to feed as a group and will attempt to drive away more solitary animals, such as turkey vultures, if they can. | Source

Habitat

American black vultures live in the southern USA (especially the southeast), all across Central, and the majority of South America.

Their preferred habitat is lowland areas, in open land with patches of woodland or brush. They also like to live along rivers, in swamps, wetlands, pastures, and grasslands.

It is rare to see them in mountainous areas.

Size

They have a wingspan of about 5 feet and weigh somewhere between 4 and 5 pounds.

Although they are smaller than turkey vultures, they are more aggressive and will often drive them away from carcasses, often using strength of numbers to intimidate.

Two black vultures perched in Ecuador.  The birds often like to perch on fence posts or dead trees.  Alternatively, they will soar, looking for potential meals.  The birds are normally silent, but can make grunts or hisses when feeding, or agitated.
Two black vultures perched in Ecuador. The birds often like to perch on fence posts or dead trees. Alternatively, they will soar, looking for potential meals. The birds are normally silent, but can make grunts or hisses when feeding, or agitated. | Source

Did you know?

Modern black vultures live exclusively in North and South America, but 34 million year old fossils of their family group have been found in Europe.

Lone black vulture perched on a tree branch.  These birds don't make conventional bird nests, rather they lay their eggs in lay their eggs in hollow tree stumps, between large rocks, and in caves, and then decorate the area with small, shiny objects.
Lone black vulture perched on a tree branch. These birds don't make conventional bird nests, rather they lay their eggs in lay their eggs in hollow tree stumps, between large rocks, and in caves, and then decorate the area with small, shiny objects. | Source

Alternative Names

These birds can also be referred to as simply black vultures, but should not be confused with the Eurasian black vulture, which is unrelated.

Some people also call them: “carrion crows”, or “black buzzards” (although it should be noted that buzzards are strictly speaking broad-winged hawks, not vultures).

American black vultures pictured at the NASA Space Center in Florida.  The birds can live happily alongside humans, largely unafraid, and will eat the food and some of the other waste that humans throw away.
American black vultures pictured at the NASA Space Center in Florida. The birds can live happily alongside humans, largely unafraid, and will eat the food and some of the other waste that humans throw away. | Source

Breeding

One interesting fact about these vultures is that don’t build nests like other birds.

Instead they lay their eggs in hollow tree stumps, between large rocks, and in caves, and decorate the area around with shards of glass, bright pieces of plastic, and small shiny metal objects, such as beer bottle tops.

They can lay anything between one and three eggs at a time, but normally the number is two, with both parents incubating them. It takes the young about 75-80 days after hatching before they can fly well.

The birds have an average lifespan of around 5 years.

Vital Statistics

Scientific name: Coragyps atratus

Wingspan: 150 cm / 5 ft

Length: 56 – 74 cm / 22 - 29 inches

Tail length: 16 – 21 cm / 6 - 8 inches

Mass: 1.6 – 2.8 kg / 3.5 - 6 lbs (North America and Andes birds), 1.2 – 1.9 kg / 2.5 - 4 lbs (Tropical lowlands birds)

Black vultures with a deer carcass.  The birds forage using smell, flying low and picking off the odor of ethyl mercaptan, a gas that is given off when dead animals start to decay.  The birds are aggressive when feeding.
Black vultures with a deer carcass. The birds forage using smell, flying low and picking off the odor of ethyl mercaptan, a gas that is given off when dead animals start to decay. The birds are aggressive when feeding. | Source

Food Sources

This breed of bird is a scavenger and soars high in the sky, using its keen eyesight to look for food.

Interesting, however, these birds do not have a great sense of smell, unlike some of the other New World vultures, such as the turkey vulture. Consequently, black vultures will often follow other types of vulture in order to find food.

Black vultures eat animal carcasses of any size. They will also eat eggs or kill newborn or injured animals, such as deer, or calves. When they aren't flying, they will perch in groups in dead trees, or on fence posts.

Black Vultures vs Turkey Vultures

  • Black vultures are outnumbered by turkey vultures in the US, even though they are the most numerous vulture in the Western Hemisphere.
  • Turkey vultures have a better sense of smell than black vultures, which is why black vultures often follow them when searching out food sources.
  • Turkey vultures are bigger, but tend to operate on their own, and black vultures can often drive them away from a carcass through sheer strength of numbers.

Subspecies

There are three subspecies of American black vulture, each with subtly different markings:

  1. The North American black vulture, which inhabits a large area extending all the way from northern Mexico up to New Jersey.
  2. The South American black vulture, which is the smallest of the three subspecies and is found in Central American and northern South America.
  3. The Andean black vulture, which is found, as its name suggests in the Andes mountain range.

Did you know?

The oldest known black vulture known was over 25 years old.

Black vultures have no voice box, so can only make rasping noises and grunts. They will make a hissing sound, if they feel threatened.

Relationship with Humans

Black vultures like living alongside humans. There are as many, if not more of them in populated areas as there are in completely wild areas. This is mainly because they can live off the food that humans inadvertently supply for them, such as the waste on garbage tips and animals killed by road vehicles.

The number of these vultures is growing, and because of climate change, they are also spreading further and further northwards.

Black vultures were often featured in the artwork of ancient cultures, such as the Mayans. In more modern times, they have appeared on postage stamps in Guyana and Nicaragua.

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Comments 6 comments

b. Malin profile image

b. Malin 5 years ago

What creepy looking birds, is that wrong to say? But your Hub is very interesting and certainly informative. There is some kind of Black bird flying around hear in South Florida, could it be the Black Vulture, they too fly very, very, high in the sky.


PaulGoodman67 profile image

PaulGoodman67 5 years ago from Florida USA Author

They are ugly and evil-looking. It may be instinctive that we humans dislike them? Those photos were actually taken at the NASA Space Centre in Florida.


theherbivorehippi profile image

theherbivorehippi 5 years ago from Holly, MI

Ahhh....one of my top favorite birds! Love love love these birds. Great hub!!!


PaulGoodman67 profile image

PaulGoodman67 5 years ago from Florida USA Author

They are fascinating birds and a vital part of the eco-system, but I cannot in all honesty say that I find them attractive. Quite the opposite, in fact.


ky_angus 4 years ago

One of my worst enemies right now. As a cow-calf farmer, I am way too aware of how aggressive they are. I had to run to the back of the field yesterday to scare them away from a day old calf. Luckily, its mom was nearby and got there first. They will pluck out the eyes of newborn calves before they're even on their feet. Nothing like the turkey vultures they are joining here in Kentucky,.


LetitiaFT profile image

LetitiaFT 4 years ago from Paris via California

Great article. I just linked to it in one of mine. Thanks.

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