How To Reduce the Number of Unwanted Pets in our Shelters

Unwanted pets often just need one more chance.

Dodger was returned to the shelter not once but twice, both times by owners who could not tolerate his high energy. He was eventually placed with a family with several children and another dog, who constantly play with Dodger and keep him engaged.
Dodger was returned to the shelter not once but twice, both times by owners who could not tolerate his high energy. He was eventually placed with a family with several children and another dog, who constantly play with Dodger and keep him engaged. | Source

But I'm just one person. What could I possibly do to help reduce the number of unwanted and abandoned animals?

Animal control officers see it every day: pets that have been abandoned. Some are left by the side of the road, others are dropped off at the veterinarian and never picked up. Brenda Hogue, owner of Fido and Friends, a pet supply store and grooming shop in my hometown of Aledo, Texas, has arrived at work to find dogs tied to the front door of her business. Nita Farris, office manager of Aledo Vet Clinic, also in Aledo, Texas, once found herself dealing with a litter of 13 abandoned puppies two days before Christmas.

This scene plays out over and over again in cities all across the United States. Every day, pets are surrendered to shelters, and every day pets are otherwise abandoned all across the country. It’s a huge problem. The Humane Society of the United States estimates that 6-8 million pets enter shelters each year, and while 3-4 million are adopted, another 3-4 million are euthanized. Whether dumped by the side of the road, surrendered to the shelter or left behind when owners move away, abandoned animals need our help. But what can the average citizen do to reduce the number of animals that find themselves in our shelters?

Unless you are a breeder, do not allow your pets to reproduce.

These adorable "Chiweenie" puppies were surrendered to the Weatherford/Parker County Animal Shelter last summer when the owner of their mother could not find homes for them.
These adorable "Chiweenie" puppies were surrendered to the Weatherford/Parker County Animal Shelter last summer when the owner of their mother could not find homes for them. | Source

Spay and Neuter Your Pets

Reducing the animal population is key to reducing the number of abandoned animals in our shelters, and spaying and neutering your dogs and cats is the single most important step a pet owner can take toward this goal.

However, not all pet owners act responsibly. According to Christine Birkbeck of Parker Paws, an all-volunteer pet adoption group in Weatherford, Texas, some pet owners think it might be fun to have a litter of puppies around the house and allow their female dog to breed. Unfortunately, these owners are often unprepared, especially when the litter turns out to be quite large. “It can be very difficult to find homes for six or eight or ten puppies,” Birkbeck said. “You might have success finding two or three homes, but then the rest end up at the shelter or on the side of the road.”

Farris agrees. “Every pet owner should be responsible, do their part and get their pets spayed or neutered,” she said. Although Aledo Vet Clinic is a veterinary office and is not in the pet adoption business, Farris often finds herself with the task of placing abandoned animals with permanent homes. “Not a single pet that we find a home for leaves here without first being spayed or neutered,” she said.

If your pets have not been sterilized, make an appointment for them TODAY. If the expense of the surgery is holding you back, call around to shelters, veterinary offices and your local government agencies and ask what sort of low-cost or free spay and neuter programs are in your area, and how to go about qualifying for them.

Consider adopting an older pet.

Because kittens and puppies have that "cuteness factor" working in their favor, adult pets sometimes wait months to be adopted, or worse, are euthanized.
Because kittens and puppies have that "cuteness factor" working in their favor, adult pets sometimes wait months to be adopted, or worse, are euthanized. | Source
Go to the shelter and meet the animals in person. This girl was wonderful with people, but was very camera shy. Thus, her photos on the pet adoption website were not too appealing. However, she was a terrific, friendly dog in person.
Go to the shelter and meet the animals in person. This girl was wonderful with people, but was very camera shy. Thus, her photos on the pet adoption website were not too appealing. However, she was a terrific, friendly dog in person. | Source

Choose Your Pets Carefully

According to Dianne Tawater, assistant director of the Weatherford/Parker County Animal Shelter in Weatherford, Texas, people unwittingly contribute to the unwanted pet population when they hastily make pet ownership decisions. “Often people don’t think about the long term,” said Tawater. “If you add a pet to your family, you should assume that you’ll have it for 15 to 18 years. Lots of people don’t think that far ahead,” Tawater said.

If you are in the market for a pet, take some time to consider your personality, your family, your budget and your living arrangements rather than bringing home the first cute puppy or kitten that melts your heart. Are you a cat person, a dog person or neither? Perhaps you’d be better suited to own a hamster, a canary or an aquarium full of fish.

Whether you have a small yard, large yard, fenced yard or no yard at all should also be taken into consideration before you choose a pet. While cats can live their entire lives indoors, a large, active dog needs plenty of room to exercise. When you choose a pet that fits your living situation, the animal is less likely to become a nuisance or a burden.

For a happy, successful owner/pet relationship, choose a pet that is compatible with your temperament and lifestyle. Consider your family members as well. A dog or cat that is brought into a home to live with people who are allergic to or fearful of them has a high likelihood of becoming an unwanted pet. Additionally, different pet breeds have different temperaments, just as people do. An active dog that needs lots of exercise and attention, such as a Jack Russell terrier or a Labrador retriever, is more likely to have a successful relationship with owners who have plenty of time and energy to devote to it.

Properly caring for a pet requires money.

An adorable "free" kitten may seem like no-brainer bargain, but responsible pet ownership must be deliberately worked into your budget.
An adorable "free" kitten may seem like no-brainer bargain, but responsible pet ownership must be deliberately worked into your budget. | Source

Consider the Expense of Pet Ownership Before Adopting

Pet ownership can be expensive. Although a neighbor or friend may give you a “free” puppy or kitten, spaying, neutering, vaccinations, food, supplies and expenses for illnesses or medical emergencies can add up quickly. With the troubled economy, Tawater sees more people surrendering their pets than ever. “We are especially seeing more large animals. At the moment we have quite a few horses and donkeys we need to find homes for,” she said.

Educate Yourself, Train Your Pet, and Give it a Chance to Improve

While some animals are naturally laid back and cooperative, others give their owners a run for their money. Tawater often sees owners who surrender their animals due to behavioral issues. “We get lots of Labrador retrievers in here when they’re about 12 to 18 months old,” she said. “That’s when they tend to really dig and chew a lot.” However, Tawater points out that you can train your pets to stop undesirable behaviors, or sometimes just wait it out. “Lots of dogs have a sort of ‘terrible two’ stage and if you work through it and wait, the behaviors will stop,” she said.

If you've never owned a dog or cat before or have unsuccessfully owned pets in the past, get yourself a good book and read up on your pet's typical behaviors and psychology. If you can understand where your pet is "coming from" and the basics of pet training, you're much more likely to build a successful pet/owner relationship. As the human, it is your responsibility to build a successful relationship. Your animal has no control over the situation it has been placed in and is merely reacting to your actions. If you and your new pet get off on the wrong foot, don't give up. Seek advice from your vet, animal trainers and friends who are successful pet owners.

Full-blooded pets are often available for adoption at shelters.

Several 100% Labrador retriever puppies were put up for adoption recently at my local shelter. Their owner was unable to sell or find homes for all ten puppies in the litter.
Several 100% Labrador retriever puppies were put up for adoption recently at my local shelter. Their owner was unable to sell or find homes for all ten puppies in the litter. | Source

Mixed breeds make wonderful pets, too.

Biff is a mixed-breed shelter dog, but that doesn't mean he can't be the perfect, loviing pet for your family. Just look at how happy and relaxed he is while being hugged by a child who he had never met until just before this photo was taken.
Biff is a mixed-breed shelter dog, but that doesn't mean he can't be the perfect, loviing pet for your family. Just look at how happy and relaxed he is while being hugged by a child who he had never met until just before this photo was taken. | Source

Adopt a Pet

Parker County, Texas is home to approximately 117,000 people in its 910 square miles. It is just one county out of many in one state out of 50. Tawater estimates that the Weatherford/Parker County Animal Shelter takes in about 100 animals per week. “Unfortunately we are not a no-kill shelter,” she said, pointing out that many of the dogs and cats who enter the shelter do not find homes. “My hope is that everyone looking for a pet will make adoption their first choice,” she said.

Most shelter pets are not "flawed" in some way that caused them to be surrendered by their original owners. Just about any shelter employee or rescue group volunteer can steer you toward well socialized, adoptable animals that would make wonderful additions to your family. Additionally, most shelters keep lists of prospective pet owners who are looking for a particular breed of dog or cat. “There are plenty of mixed breeds in shelters, but if you want a certain type, we do get full-blooded breeds often,” Tawater said. “You just might need to be a bit patient to get the breed you want.” There are also rescue groups devoted to specific breeds, and these wonderful folks would be happy to introduce you to their foster animals.

Adoptions fees differ from state to state and from shelter to shelter, but are often very reasonable compared to breeders, pet stores and puppy mills. Additionally, most shelters and animal adoption groups include the cost of spaying or neutering and vaccinations in their adoption fees.

Foster a Pet

Pet adoption and rescue groups are always looking for people to foster pets they have up for adoption. Obviously, foster situations differ from organization to organization, but the basic premise is to bring a pet to live in your own home until the animal is adopted. Fostering not only saves that particular animal's life, but also opens up a spot within the shelter or rescue group for another homeless animal, possibly saving its life as well.

Adopt a black dog.

Some people think that black dogs look menacing and aggressive, and some people are just superstitious. For these reasons, shelters often have a tough time finding homes for black dogs and sometimes reduce their adoption fees.
Some people think that black dogs look menacing and aggressive, and some people are just superstitious. For these reasons, shelters often have a tough time finding homes for black dogs and sometimes reduce their adoption fees. | Source

Volunteer

Animal rescue groups, adoption groups and shelters are always in need of volunteers to help out with their animals. Volunteers perform a variety of tasks to help pets find homes, including walking, socializing and bathing animals and helping prospective pet owners choose a new friend. If you're a skilled laborer or skilled professional, consider volunteering your services to your local shelter or animal rescue group.

I am a healthy, friendly, well socialized pet! Living in this cage is so depressing. Please don't leave me here to be euthanized! Have me spayed and bring me home, and I will reward you with love, affection and faithful companionship.
I am a healthy, friendly, well socialized pet! Living in this cage is so depressing. Please don't leave me here to be euthanized! Have me spayed and bring me home, and I will reward you with love, affection and faithful companionship. | Source

Donate

It's safe to say that the shelters, adoption centers and rescue groups in your area operate on small budgets. Donations of supplies such as pet food, cat litter, leashes, blankets, old newspapers and towels are always appreciated. Monetary donations, no matter how big or small, are always happily accepted, and can be put toward overhead or the spaying and neutering of animals up for adoption.

"Help the Pets" Parties

Several children in my area have generously asked the guests at their birthday parties to bring pet food in lieu of birthday gifts. Mom, dad and the birthday child then load up the food and drop it off at their local shelter once the party is over. It's a great way to help the unwanted animals in your area, while at the same time demonstrating to children the joys of being a helpful, responsible community member.

Pet Population-Control Poll

If you own cats and/or dogs, are 100% of them spayed or neutered?

See results without voting

Unintended Litter Poll

Has a cat or dog in your care ever been pregnant with, given birth to, or sired an unintended litter of puppies or kittens?

See results without voting

Best Friends for Life

Charlie, the Labrador who was given to us by friends who had a litter of 11 puppies, loves his pal Jessi, our mixed breed shelter dog. They play constantly and keep each other company when the humans in our family are not around.
Charlie, the Labrador who was given to us by friends who had a litter of 11 puppies, loves his pal Jessi, our mixed breed shelter dog. They play constantly and keep each other company when the humans in our family are not around. | Source

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Comments 25 comments

jasper420 4 years ago

Great tips I enjoyed this hub very much good work thanks for raising awareness!


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

This is a terrific hub touching on just about all subjects with regard to responsible pet ownership. I intend to share this in every way possible to help spread the word so that helpless animals are not brought into this world and then abandoned or needlessly euthanized. Good work! Up, useful, awesome votes and will tweet, FB and share with my followers.


jenniferrpovey profile image

jenniferrpovey 4 years ago

Good work. I would add: Never buy any animal from a pet shop (except for commercial feeder rodents if you keep snakes). Even pocket pets should be purchased directly from a good breeder. Absolutely do not buy a larger pet from a pet shop - these puppies and kittens almost always come from mills.

Buying from a good, reputable breeder is not bad, either. Also, if you are looking for an adult dog or cat of a specific breed, breeders will sometimes be trying to place retired show or breeding animals, or animals that proved not to be fertile in good pet homes.


JKenny profile image

JKenny 4 years ago from Birmingham, England

I loved reading this hub, a must read for anyone considering buying a dog or cat. In the UK, we have a problem with breeders breeding dogs en masse particularly in rural areas and treating them badly. The problem is that many people desire 'pedigree' breeds and think that the breeders are the best source. But often 'pedigrees' are laden with medical problems, because of all the inbreeding that goes on. Your average mongrel is a far healthier animal, and a better ethical choice.


SmartAndFun profile image

SmartAndFun 4 years ago from Texas Author

Thanks for the positive feedback, everyone. It's my pleasure to spread the word.


alexadry profile image

alexadry 4 years ago from USA

Awesome hub! Voted up, great information there!


RNMSN profile image

RNMSN 4 years ago from Tucson, Az

oh I know!!! I love our cat named Dog :) bay girl nameed him

but Ai long for a dog..

sigh...

one day :)

right now though, Dog the cat would just beat the poor dog to death!!!Dog is a warrior cat


winbo profile image

winbo 4 years ago

nice one ! Great informatio


brandrocker profile image

brandrocker 4 years ago

You have once again reminded us the important factors to consider before getting a new pet, the care it needs and things to do so that both of us would be happy. A hub, which is full of thoughts and passion, something every pet owners should read and follow. Thanks for sharing your experience.


RickMc profile image

RickMc 4 years ago from Kentucky

Good solid advice. Thanks!


Simone Smith profile image

Simone Smith 4 years ago from San Francisco

It's really heartwarming to know that there are so many things one person can do to keep pets out of shelters. Thanks for sharing your advice! I'll do my best to spread the word and pitch in where I can :D


Millionaire Tips profile image

Millionaire Tips 4 years ago from USA

I love all the research and interviews you did to prepare for this hub. It's great information with wonderful pictures.


Arlene V. Poma 4 years ago

My black lab was the last of a litter that could not be sold, and the pound put her in a cage close to the ceiling. If she didn't bark at me, I never would have found her, and she was with me for 13 years. What a lovely article and photographs. I will always adopt dogs, and they will always be a part of my life. Voted up and everything else. AWESOME!


SmartAndFun profile image

SmartAndFun 4 years ago from Texas Author

Thanks everyone for stopping by, and for your kind comments. Adoption is definitely the way to go!


mary615 profile image

mary615 4 years ago from Florida

I have fostered dogs and rescued dogs. There was a Maltese I fostered and just couldn't let him go. I wrote a Hub about him, I named him Mister. I voted this Hub UP, etc.etc.


cookies4breakfast profile image

cookies4breakfast 4 years ago from coastal North Carolina

This is a wonderful hub and very timely. Tomorrow is National Spay Day. I just saw a button online this morning, and it had ten beautiful cat faces along the outer edges. In the middle of the button, it said, "The ten best reasons to have your cat spayed were euthanized this morning." I couldn't stop crying. Thank you again for bringing attention to animals in need.


jandee profile image

jandee 3 years ago from Liverpool.U.K

Very good hub,I have found and re-homed dozens ,and found owners who had lost their dogs. The figures are shocking and it is in most other countries as well with one exception and that is in the Island of Jersey in the Channel Islands------"The Animal Shelter" they didn't have one pet in over xmas I hope it has remained that way,

best from jandee


jandee profile image

jandee 3 years ago from Liverpool.U.K

I have to amend the information from the above about 'Jersey Animal Shelter.' They said they had no pets in the shelter(Cats and Dogs) on xmas holiday. Now from their update since then they have 22 cats and 9 dogs. This is a wealthy,wealthy Island but it seems it is not able to prevent the problem the pets have I am sorry to say.

jandee


SmartAndFun profile image

SmartAndFun 3 years ago from Texas Author

Thanks so much for your input, Jandee. Unfortunately unwanted pets are a major problem just about everywhere. It makes me so sad to think about all the animals that are either euthanized or wasting away, locked up in cages. Tragic! Birth control is the key!


jandee profile image

jandee 3 years ago from Liverpool.U.K

I have to take issue with your writer jkenny. I agree there are lots of rogue breeders but the majority of pedigree breeders are self regulating and have the most expensive health tests on their animals and now they are ,many of them,are reducing the litters drastically to maybe 3 matings.. I think the 'baddies' are the ones who have puppy farms and these should be restricted/stopped. Another problem is that the overbreeding of The American Pitull type dog is so incredibly cheap and therefore falls into the wrong hands. As for pets being sold in shops it is a scandle and being a coward I could not venture into such a place. ,

good hub .


Pamela Kinnaird W profile image

Pamela Kinnaird W 3 years ago from Maui and Arizona

What a comprehensive hub on this subject -- a subject close to my heart. And I really like the idea you mention in here about having a children's party and suggesting to the guests that instead of a birthday gift for the birthday person, bring some dog food or something useful for the local animal shelter.

Voting up, useful, awesome and sharing.


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America

It's 16 below here right now. Tomorrow the schools will be closed. Today someone found a dog tied alongside the road in this bitter cold weather. He’s alive doing well in a shelter.Voted up.


DDE profile image

DDE 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

It is sad to see how animals are pushed to one side after a disaster or if people can't afford them, and not forgetting the neglect caused with many your ideas are most helpful and simple.


enjoy life profile image

enjoy life 2 years ago from Europe

Great advice. It is sad seeing how many animals end up in shelters. People need to realise that owning a pet is a responsibility, not just a nice toy for you to play with, then discard. I think it is also vital that people realise the value of adopting a senior animal from a shelter. They deserve to enjoy what is left of their lives. Also having your animals spayed/neutered helps to reduce the current over breeding of many animals. The puppies or kittens may be 'so cute' however many of them will end up in shelters or being euthanised while still young. Responsible pet ownership is so important


SmartAndFun profile image

SmartAndFun 2 years ago from Texas Author

I agree, enjoy life. Thanks for commenting.

And thanks to everyone who has commented, as I apparently have been neglecting the comments section here. I didn't realize there were a couple from a year ago that I never even acknowledged.

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