Snakes Alive! : Serpents of Southeastern Georgia

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Swamp Serpents

One of the many advantages of living in rural southern Georgia is having an opportunity to observe different species of wildlife. Because most of the countryside consists of agricultural operations, a large amount of swamps and forested areas remain for these creatures to thrive in.

One of the most encountered of the denizens are the snakes. These wonderful reptiles are often seen as they attempt to cross the numerous back roads which border the swamps and forests. Most encountered in this area is the Timber Rattlesnake know locally as a Canebrake Rattler.

The Eastern Diamondback rattlesnake was once the dominant rattlesnake around here but the Canebrake has since usurped its reign over the area.  Whatever, I encounter many snakes in my day to day working routine. I have recently begun photographing them to have a record of the different species of snakes in this area.

This article will be a work in progress as I add more pictures whenever I get some of interest. I may also choose to add pictures of other animals in case you may think the snakes ate em all! If any of the snakes are unidentified feel free to offer your opinion. I am not an expert but do know most of the species in this area.


Why did the snake cross the road?

Canebrake(timber rattlesnake)
Canebrake(timber rattlesnake)
Beautiful kingsnake-hunter of other snakes
Beautiful kingsnake-hunter of other snakes
Close-up of kingsnake
Close-up of kingsnake
Yep, this is a blue snake.  Suspected hognose snake
Yep, this is a blue snake. Suspected hognose snake
Close-up of the blue beauty
Close-up of the blue beauty

Canebrake on the road in Southeast Georgia

Reptiles Galore

Black racer
Black racer
Gopher tortoise
Gopher tortoise
Another canebrake
Another canebrake
A closer look
A closer look

More Snakes

Banded water snake
Banded water snake
Another photo of the banded water snake
Another photo of the banded water snake
canebrake
canebrake
Angry canebrake
Angry canebrake
Close-up of a canebrake rattler's head
Close-up of a canebrake rattler's head

Coiled canebrake

"Do not mess with me!"
"Do not mess with me!"
Young canebrake
Young canebrake

More by this Author


Comments 16 comments

ralwus 7 years ago

Good job. We have Timber Rattler from where I was born south of here. Masauga's are local in our huge Killbuck Swamp[not as large as yours], a rare breed. Blue Ravers, black Snakes and luckily no Copperheads in this area. Keep up the good work of photographing these critters.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 7 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

There are many more snakes I have yet to photograph ralwus. Wonderful creatures!


catwoman89 profile image

catwoman89 7 years ago

You seem like such an intriguing dude! Thank you for sharing yourself on hubpages!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 7 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Many thanks catwoman89,I'm glad you stopped by to check out my hub.


fastfreta profile image

fastfreta 6 years ago from Southern California

Okay, I remember living sometime in South Georgia, Blakley, to be exact, and I do remember snakes there, but not that many different varieties. Okay, so I was very young, but nevertheless I cannot remember those snakes. I do remember however that I was not that afraid of them then. But now, oh my goodness, I can't even look at them on TV. What's that about. Very good hub. Oh say, did I miss something, I didn't see a comment section on your hub about retiring to Southern Georgia? Very good hub!


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

I'm sure there were plenty of different snakes around Blakely, fastfreda. You just didn't see them when you were there. Thanks for commenting on my hubs, I always appreciate the prospective of a native southerner.


Mit Kroy profile image

Mit Kroy 6 years ago from Georgia,USA

Great hub Randy! One snake I remember being chased by, that had a real fiery disposition, was a water moccasin, which are in great supply in south Georgia.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hey Mit! I have been keeping an eye out for a chance to get a picture of a cottonmouth, but no luck so far. Plenty of canebrakes though. Just missed getting a photo of an enormous coachwhip a while back. He was too fast for me.


Sue 6 years ago

When we first took our 20 acres in FL the pond was infested with coachwhips. Wow what a trip that was for someone that does not like snakes. We were cleaning brush around the edges of the pond when we first saw them and soon realized how defensive of their territory they were. After all the brush was gone (we ended up getting machinery to do it because of the snakes) they moved on. Probably out into the nearby bay head or creek where there was more cover.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Coachwhips are rare around here these days, Sue. They seem to be more intelligent than the pit vipers or several other species found here. I've been trying to get some good photos of a coachwhip, but they are very fast.

They also seem fearsome because of the way they rise up and look around the area. They are constrictors by the way.

Thanks for your coachwhip story and for reading my article.


MPG Narratives profile image

MPG Narratives 6 years ago from Sydney, Australia

Lovely snakes Randy, but you want to see some really nice ones just visit us in Australia. Lots of lovely 'wild' animals down here. :)


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Would love to come over and see them, MPG! We have quite a few here too! My cousin bagged a black bear with a bow this weekend! A little bit dangerous, huh?


MPG Narratives profile image

MPG Narratives 6 years ago from Sydney, Australia

OMG, is he ok? The black bear I mean. Look forward to seeing you down here.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Let's just say the bear is feeling no pain! Thanks for the invite! And the comments, of course!


2 years ago

I think your blue beauty may be an indigo snake. they're on the endangered list


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia Author

Hello J, and thanks for your comment. I am well aware of the indigo snake's endangered status and am familiar with them as I've observed them in the wild. This "blue beauty" is indeed a hog nose snake as I suspected originally. I've seen several of them since I wrote this article. Thanks for reading! :)

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