The Beautiful Cockatoo

The Abbott's Lesser Sulphur Crested Cockatoo from Indonesia

Abbott's Lesser Sulphur Crested Cockatoo By Fnda Nyberg CC BY-SA 3.0
Abbott's Lesser Sulphur Crested Cockatoo By Fnda Nyberg CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

Abbott's Lesser Sulphur Crested Cockatoo

The Abbott's Lesser Sulphur Crested cockatoo's scientific name is Cacatua sulphurea abbotti.

They are a gorgeous bird. They are found on Indonesia's island of Solombo Besar. They will make their home hollows they find in large trees

The Abbott's Lesser Sulphur Crested cockatoo's numbers are declining some at this time. Farmers consider them pests because they eat their agricultural crops and they will nest in their fields. They like to eat seeds, fruit, insects and different agricultural crops.

They are 34cm long. Their body is white. Under their tail and wings is yellow. They have a beautiful fan shaped crest that is yellow. Their legs are gray, and their beak is black.

They are threatened because they are losing habitat to agriculture. Farmers poison and shoot them. They are popular in the pet trade, so many are captured. There are many raised for the pet trade in captivity, so this has helped the wild population, but it is still declining.


The Gang-Gang Cockatoo of Australia

Gang-Gang Cockatoo By Peter B. Krashenbuehl CC BY-SA 4.0
Gang-Gang Cockatoo By Peter B. Krashenbuehl CC BY-SA 4.0 | Source

You will find the Gang-Gang cockatoo living in Australia. They prefer the alpine bushland.

They are a beautiful light gray color. The male's head and crest are red. The female's crest is small and gray.

The Gang-Gang cockatoo will build their nest in young trees. The female will use her beak to make a cavity in the tree for her nest. They like to nest in the tree canopy. The eggs are incubated by both the male and female and they both will feed the babies for 4 to 6 weeks after they fledge.

They are losing nesting areas and their food supply because the trees are being cut down. They are considered vulnerable.

They will eat mainly seeds. They like eucalyptus, wattles and hawthorns the best. They will also eat berries, fruit nuts, insects and insect larvae. They will lonely leave the trees to get water and eat the fruit that has fallen from the trees.


The Long-billed Corella Cockatoo from Australia

 Long-billed Corella Cockatoo By Cudditel CC BY-SA 3.0
Long-billed Corella Cockatoo By Cudditel CC BY-SA 3.0 | Source

The Long-Billed Corella from Australia

The Long-billed Corella's scientific name is Creatus tenuirostris.

The Long-billed Corella is found in several areas of Australia. They like grassy woodlands, grasslands, pastures and croplands. The Long-billed Corella is also found in parks and urban areas.

They are a white medium-sized cockatoo. They have a short tail and short crest that is not always seen. The underside of their wings and tails are washed with light yellow. Their forehead and throat have orange-red markings on it. They have a pale grey-blue ring on their eye. Their upper breast has orange-red crescents on it.

Both the male and female Long-billed Corella will build a nest, incubate the eggs and take care of the babies. They build their nest in old eucalyptus tree hollows. They sometimes use cavities in cliffs. The nest is lined with decayed wood.

The Long-billed Corella likes to eat seeds but grain is their favorite. They also like bulbs, roots and insects. The Long-billed Corella are considered pests by farmers because they damage grain crops and orchards. The Long-billed Corella is sometimes shot by the farmers. They have lost many of their nest sites, and their numbers are declining.



The Moluccan Cockatoo from Indonesia

Moluccan Cockatoo from Indonesia Courtesey of www.irajar24A.com  CC BY-SA 2.0
Moluccan Cockatoo from Indonesia Courtesey of www.irajar24A.com CC BY-SA 2.0 | Source

The Moluccan Cockatoo from Indonesia

The Moluccan cockatoo is found living on the Moluccan Islands of Indonesia. They make their home in the lowland forests.

The Moluccan cockatoo is 20 inches tall and is longer than most cockatoo species. Their tail is short. Their body is usually white and can have a salmon pink tinge. Their crest is salmon pink. Their beak is black.

They are very noisy and destructive. The coconut plantation owners consider them pests because they will get the soft pulp of young coconuts and damage the coconut. The eat insects, seeds, nuts, fruit and coconuts.

They are extremely social birds and will mate for life. They like to get in trees that have a lot of fruit.

They move around during the day. At night, they will sleep in high branches that do not have leaves on them.

They are losing habitat and are captured for the pet trade.



The Galah Cockatoo from Australia

Galah Cockatoo from Australia By Bjoertvedt CC BY-SA 4.0
Galah Cockatoo from Australia By Bjoertvedt CC BY-SA 4.0 | Source

The Galah Cockatoo from Australia

The Galah's scientific name is Eolophus roseicapilla.

The Galah is a gorgeous cockatoo that is known by many names such as Rose-breasted Cockatoo, Roseate Cockatoo and Pink and Grey.

They are very plentiful in Australia. You will find them just about everywhere. They are common in urban areas and metropolitan areas. The settlers made their life better because they cleared the forests, and this made the Galah's life easier.

The Galah will look for food on the ground in open areas.

The Galah is 35cm long and will usually weigh 270 to 350g. Their back is a pale to medium grey. Their rump is pale grey, and their face and chest is pink. They have a crest that is light pink.

They will make their nest in cavities in trees. The female Galah will lay 2 to 5 eggs that will hatch in 25 days. The male and female, both sit on the eggs. The Galah babies will leave the nest when they are around 49 days old.


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