Dog-gone it, Loud Noises Hurt My Ears

Prevent Panic Attacks For Your Pooch

Why Do We Do Fireworks on the 4th?

There is nothing wrong about celebrating the 4th of July.,the birth of our nation. It is a wonderful way to express pride in our nation. People enjoy the exciting displays. The cascading streaks of color and loud booms are an integral part of our summer ritual. However over the years the practice has become increasingly annoying because of the excess and the length of time these loud displays continue throughout the summer months. Our founding fathers felt that every American should celebrate our country's independence with fireworks, canon and rifle volleys and exuberant noise, but it has gone far beyond that. That celebration now stretches out for weeks and months.

The liberalization of local firework laws have opened up opportunities for thousands of fireworks retailers all across the nation, who may legally sell fireworks all year long in some communities. for the sake of profits not necessarily to celebrate our country's birth.

As a result, because retailers can sell without any serious limitations, the country has become inundated with potentially dangerous and annoying products. The populace is becoming increasing disenchanted with an entire summer filled with annoying explosions. It's getting old and needs to be limited to the holiday only, not for weeks at a time. In fact many communities that once welcomed the sale of fireworks are now looking for ways to end the sale of them after a couple of years of excess.

bad boom boom !
bad boom boom ! | Source

Enough Already! Don't Be a Jerk with Your Fireworks

Ban The Booms - Save The Dogs!

How You Can Protect Your Pet from the Booming Sounds of Summer Fireworks


Dogs are very sensitive to sounds, Their hearing is much sharper than that of a human. You know how a loud boom can affct you. Imagine what it does to your pets. If you don't ownn one, take pity of those pf us who do. It is practically impossible tosoothe a pet that has been distressed by the roaring thunderof hours of explosions

Summer is supposed to be time for fun and celebration. It is a time when Americans reflect on the traditions and history of our great country. While the holidays may be cause for human celebration, they often bring misery and many restless nights to our household pets. The hell weeks of summer are a nightmare for a large number of pets and humans.

What makes this time of year so miserable for pets are the fireworks that fill the skies and pound ear drums for many weeks during the summer. The oppressive noise begins in May when over anxious adults and youngsters begin practicing for the big fireworks day, July 4th. Of late, restrictions on fireworks have been lifted in many communities so that practically anyone who breathes can buy and set off fireworks.

My schnauzer is a normally calm and placid animal. But the sound of fireworks drives her into a state of frenzy that is almost unbelievable in its intensity. She shakes, trembles, whines and scratches at the rug in frustration because of the fireworks. She is terrfied beyond belief and there is little or nothing i can do to help her. I sometimes feel she is on the verge of a heart attack. If only the lunatics could see her suffer through this.


If you are a pet owner, you have experienced the situation:


The commotion starts as darkness descends. It erupts into deafening booms that increase in intensity as the evening goes on. The crescendo continues, often well past midnight. Each violent boom brings a whimper, sometimes a howl and a round of panicked breathing from our pets. Pets tremble with terror and often hide in dark corners or under beds hoping to escape the torment and fear the explosions bring. Experts claim that a dog's hearing is 5 times sharper than that of a human. What appears loud to us must be unbearable to them. Unless your dog is combat trained to handle the noisy barrage of explosive bombs and aerial displays, your pet may well be in great agony.

If the fireworks were only a one-holiday, one night event, we might all be able tolerate the extra decibels for that short term. Unfortunately, as it stands, it has gotten out of hand. The disruption begins in May and lasts through September and beyond, as more individuals find cause to celebrate New Years Eve, Halloween and any occasion worth announcing or celebrating. In the meantime, our pets become more neurotic, and we lose hours of sleep trying to soothe them.


What's the answer?

There are a number of possible answers and solutions worth investigating. That being said, we need to take it upon ourselves to search out remedies that work best for us, all the while thanking our lucky stars that the noises we find so distracting and irritating are firecrackers and bottle rockets, not the sounds of incoming live ammo, bombs and attack missiles.

One solution is to play soothing background music at bedtime to calm your dog. Another possibility is a mild animal tranquilizer to enable the animal to sleep through the distractions. Zanax is often recommended by many vets. This solution should be used only after consulting with your pet's vet about the dosage.

Find A Quiet Zone

Here is a strategy that often works for our dog. If our dog can find a quiet room away from windows , it will often drown out the worst of the sounds. The basement is another quiet zone. Anyplace that shields their ultra sensitive ears from the noise helps. In the meantime, press your local police to enforce the fireworks laws that have been st in place but rarely enforced. Your dog's mental health is a serious issue

The web is full of possible "cures" and solution. Proceed with caution, - but if fireworks are that big of a concern, it is certainly worth your time and effort to try and find a viable solution.

It's Impossible to Ban Fireworks Completely. The best idea is to limit fireworks displays to the actual day of the holiday. But it is an uphill battle we pet owners face. Hopefully, reason will prevail some day. Don't hold your breath.

Spread the word and save the dogs.

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