jump to last post 1-14 of 14 discussions (75 posts)

What Can We Do To Stop Bullfighting.

  1. profile image0
    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago

    One way is to write a letter to the Spanish Goverment. If you copy the following address, you will be directed to a place where your letter will go to the Spanish Ambassador:     http://e-activist.com/ea-action/action? … llfighting

    Just copy and paste into google and hit enter. It will lead you to a form letter that will automatically be sent to the Spanish Ambassador. I think that if people get involved it does make a difference. What do you think?

    1. profile image0
      SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Actually you can just click on the http address it will take you directly to the site. It is very easy to add your name (it is like signing a petition). When you do you will get the following letter:

      Dear ____,
      Thank you for adding your voice in this urgent call to protect bulls from needless, cruel deaths for entertainment.

      Your letter will join many others from around the world reminding the Spanish government that this tradition has no place in a modern society.

      We will keep you updated on our progress in helping save these magnificent animals from such a horrible fate.

      In the meantime, you can more about WSPA’s campaign to ban bullfighting on our website: http://www.wspa.ca

      Thank you for caring about the animals!

      The WSPA Canada team

      Note: it costs nothing to send the letter (it is a prewritten letter; all you have to do is add your name to it).
      I believe speaking up does make a difference.

  2. profile image0
    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago

    Culture isn't an excuse for cruelty.

    1. wilderness profile image94
      wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Neither is your culture an excuse to demand that all other cultures conform to what you think is right.  If there is one place where the US errs grievously it is in trying to be the morality police of the world.

      1. profile image0
        SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Wrong is wrong.

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Explain that to the terrorist believing that killing an American will get them their virgins in heaven.  Or to those performing female genital mutilation on young girls.  Or the prostitutes in Nevada, happy with the work that is putting them through college.  Or to those running dog fights (or bullfights).

          Obviously, your wrong is not universal.

          1. profile image0
            SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            So you are saying do nothing? You are saying that all Muslims think like terrorists? You are saying that all people believe in female genital mutilation? No they do not. People fight. There are people in all those countries that are apposed to the cruelty. There is cruetly in all cultures and just because some people do evil things and even if it is cultural it does not mean that all people of that culture agree with the cruelty. The woman who had her ears and nose and cut off didn't agree and thank God she had people to help her, not people like you (in my opinion) who would of just turned away and let her bleed to death on a hill because it wasn't your business and who are you to judge. Thank God everyone isn't like you.

            1. wilderness profile image94
              wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Don't put words in my post that aren't there - I never said all Muslims are terrorists or that everyone in the world practices genital mutilation. 

              The point is that you do NOT have the right to form the morality of another nation.  The people there do, and they will form their morality the way they want to.  You have made the pretty obvious claim that only you are capable of defining what "wrong" is - that others should go along with your definition, but you are sadly mistaken.  You are not capable of defining it for everyone and you have no right to do so.

              1. profile image0
                SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                We don't have to explain to the terrorists why they are wrong do we? "Explain that to the terrorist believing that killing an American will get them their virgins in heaven". Is that necessary? No, wrong is wrong. Blowing up the twin towers was wrong whether is is a cultural thing or whether some people think those who were flying the planes were just doing what they thought best. There is a universal right and wrong; it is wrong to blow up somebody else's building. It was wrong for the bombers to set bombs in Boston. It doesn't matter if those doing the bad deeds agree or not.
                There are basic rights and wrongs and strong people stand up. If the other nation is torturing people like the Taliban? Nobody outside the country has the right to object? If Hitler kills Jews, nobody has the right to object because the Nazis will 'form their morality the way they want to'.

  3. SimeyC profile image89
    SimeyCposted 4 years ago

    What would you think if the rest of the world wrote to the US government demanding them to stop allowing people have guns? or freedom of speech? or anything else we take for granted in the USA?

    1. profile image0
      SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Torturing animals for profit is wrong no matter where you live. It's not about freedom for people to do what they like. It's about the rights of animals that are being abused.

      1. SimeyC profile image89
        SimeyCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        What about the death penalty? etc. Different countries have different laws and morals - just because we think something is cruel doesn't give us the right dictate what other democratic nations do.

        1. profile image0
          SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Yes it does. Everyone has the right to voice their opinion. And if enough people speak out it could make a difference. If you are too scared to speak up against injustice or if you are just too apathetic, that is your right.

          1. SimeyC profile image89
            SimeyCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            That's an entirely different thing - freedom of speech is very important and you and I and Wilderness have every right to express our opinions - and in some cases it is a very powerful tool to enact change. However, if a different country doesn't want to change or have their own views, then regardless of what we think, we have to respect their right to make their own laws.

            I actually agree with you that Bull-figthing is cruel - but I cannot force a sovereign nation to change their views...

            1. profile image0
              SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              That is the same thing. I have the freedom to sign a petition. I have the freedom to disagree. I have the freedome to judge. And so does everyone else. If people come together, I think we can have an impact on other cultures. Canada was pushed by the world to be more humane to Native Indians and to be kinder to animals.

              In many cases we can't force a nation to change but maybe we can convince them when they see how many people are outraged. People can change and so can nations but it takes somebody saying, "Hey wait a second". Sometimes people don't have the perspective to see what is right in front of their noses.

              Sometimes we can't just respect the rights of others to make their own laws and that is why the USA did drills in South Korea to send a message to North Korea who was threatening to nuke South Korea.

              1. SimeyC profile image89
                SimeyCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                I'm not entirely disagreeing with you.... however it has to work both ways - the gun law is a prime example - the majority of the world's opinion is that gun laws need changing in the US - however the US will never listen to opinion of others when it comes to consitutional rights....

                1. profile image0
                  SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  I need more information on the gun debate. Have the gun laws changed at all? I don't know. I believe it is harder to get a gun than it used to be. But to take away guns altogether; I think that is the arguement. And a person owning a gun isn't hurting anybody. People hurt people with guns, knives, stones, shovels, fists, ect....

                  1. profile image0
                    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    argument.

                  2. SimeyC profile image89
                    SimeyCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Recently a bill was introduced to make background checks more difficult and stop certain individuals from being allowed to own guns - this didn't pass. The right to bear arms is not being questioned - it's simply trying to stop guns getting into the wrong hands.

                    90% of the population of the USA believe there should be more stringent background checks - yet the 'democratic' government didn't pass the law thanks to the NRA.

                    The rest of the world has a similar opinion about stricter gun laws - however, I'm sure there's not one American who would want overseas opinion to change American Law.

                    I do understand that Animal Cruelty is more of an international standard - but it's still very difficult to change other countries laws especially when something is cloaked in hundreds of years of tradition!

        2. Charlu profile image83
          Charluposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Because we are a democracy  there are as we speak different counties in different states that are changing the process of selling guns, and states where the death penalty is NOT an option for those convicted. 
          Whether we voted that way or we voted into office politicians who supported our beliefs is why it is a matter of law.

    2. wilderness profile image94
      wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      We've already been condemned for allowing the death penalty and for having too many guns.  The UN, in particular, wants American guns gone.

      And we don't listen any more than Spain will.  Our country, our morality, our laws, just as bullfighting is Spains.

      1. profile image0
        SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Having guns is not the same thing as torturing animals. And I hope we are never let off the hook. If we do evil, it should be stopped, like ending slavery. That was a cultural thing that enslaved.

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          If we do evil, it should be stopped. 

          Now, who defines evil?  You?  Your version of God?  Your country, neighbors or pastor?  When you've made the choice of who will define it, can you explain why that person's definition is better than the Spaniards is?

          1. profile image0
            SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            I get it, you're the type that doesn't get involved.

            1. profile image0
              SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              It is scary when a person is so wishy-washy that nothing is evil to them, "Well it depends on the culture". So the man in Austria who locked his daughter away in the attic and raped her for years, forcing her and her children to live in a hole; is that evil? The wishy-washy person says, "Well, who defines evil anyway?". The strong save the girl and her children while the weak say, "Well, who is to say what is wrong?"

              1. wilderness profile image94
                wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Who gave you the right (or ability) to define morality for the world?

                That IS the crux of the problem, but one you have steadfastly refused to answer.  Who gave you the right?

                1. profile image0
                  SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  It isn't just me. I'm not the only one against bullfighting or against world injustice. It is up to all of us to stand up and say, "No!" when animals are tortured, when people are tortured instead of taking the wishy-washy approach, "Well, if that's what they want to do, whom am I to say?" It's not my morality. It is morality. The basic set of rights and wrongs that say putting Jews in gas ovens is wrong.

                  1. profile image0
                    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    But I guess some people do not have the ability or the guts to say "Wrong is wrong".

              2. SimeyC profile image89
                SimeyCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Wrong - Wilderness is not 'wishy washy' - his point is that why is your view of what is evil, better than the Spanish view of what is evil? What gives you the right to judge?

                1. profile image0
                  SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  What gives you the right to judge my comments to Wilderness? Who gave Wilderness the right to disagree with me? Everyone has the right to judge. And not everyone is Spain agrees with bullfighting.

                  1. SimeyC profile image89
                    SimeyCposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Everyone has a right to an opinion and to judge - but the judging is always going to be subjective and based on one's own views and morals - doesn't make your judgement any better or worse than mine, or Spains.

                    I'm not judging you - you have every right to have your opinion and voice your opinion....

  4. profile image0
    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago

    Was it wrong for people to help the Jews and others in World War 11 wilderness? You would have let Hitler do what he wanted because you weren't the one getting killed? It is up to all people to monitor all people and not allow people or animals to suffer and to do nothing is being a coward.

  5. profile image0
    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago

    The gun debate is another issue. Guns don't kill people in my opinion, people kill people. If you out law guns, next you'll have to outlaw knives and then sharp rocks, ect... I am sure there are rules involved in obtaining a gun. I'm sure people need to be trained and if not than the requirements to obtain a gun should be be improved.

    But a person who has a gun in their gun storage area is not a criminal because they own a gun. Yes, morality does need to be debated. It isn't just one person defining everything obviously. It isn't religion either. At one time it was considered evil to have a birth mark or red hair.

    It is the universal, common sense wrongs and rights. And people in North America have to improve too. In Canada, seal bashing is just as wrong as bullfighting in Spain. It is brutally killing an animal and that is wrong. I am glad measure are being taken to improve the life of farm animals. In Co-op shopping centers, the stores only take meat from farmers who are follow specific animal guidelines. We all have to change and improve.

    1. wilderness profile image94
      wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Hmmm.  I thought we went over this idea that morality is universal, that common sense will always give the same answer to morality and ethical decisions.

      Do you then live in a world composed of only yourself?  Or just believe that anyone not agreeing with you HAS no common sense?

      You know, SandCastles, in the whole I do agree with you.  I would never watch a bullfight - it is a barbaric custom I'm not interested in.  I also agree that we should and do attempt to change others to our own belief system, but the line must be drawn somewhere.

      I choose to draw it at the national level.  Something that I find offensive must be really bad before I would try to change a national past time - it is up to the people that live there to change it.  Genital mutilation, perhaps, or the killing of millions (or one) Jew.  Not how a cow is killed; on the grand scale of things that's pretty far down the list and something that needs left to the nation and it's people.

      1. profile image0
        SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I didn't think you were wishy-washy wilderness. I know that lines need to be drawn to a certain extent. In Canada, we tried to change the Natives because we thought we knew best and tried to take away their language. We didn't stop to think that maybe they had something to teach us too.  It isn't good to be one-sided and think there is only one form of rightness.

        I agree that it is up to the people living in a country to speak up too. The spanish people have to speak up too. On a personal level, a person has to speak up for themselves and they can't always wait for somebody else to come to the rescue.

        I have a soft spot for animals and children because they can't speak up for themselves. There is cruelty everywhere, like the butchering of dogs in Korea or how China treats its moon bears. There is probably so much more cruetly out there that I don't know about, cruelty to people and animals.

        I don't think that people who disagree with me have no common sense; not about everything. If I like a song and someone doesn't, that's fine. If somebody isn't hurting another creature or violating someone's rights, I try to be less opinionated. I have my opinions but I don't want to force them on others.

        I have Asperger's and I react very strongly to the suffering of animals to the point where it affects my sleep. When I taught school on the reserve I saw starving dogs. I couldn't just look away. I had to help them. They were starving to death. Teachers were walking by sipping coffee. I did help them. I took them to get adopted. I washed them and cared for them. I got in trouble for it. I was told that I was offended some of the Native people who said, "cycle of life". But other Native people helped the dogs too and the kids wanted to help the animals. They'd come to me and ask me to help.

        1. profile image0
          SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          correction: that I was offending

        2. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          For the most part, I agree with you.  My neighbor infuriates me because he has a dog in a 10X15 dog run (giant cage).  The dog gets no companionship, other than a minute or two when it's fed.  He gets fed, watered and has a dog house for weather, but that's it and I can't stand people that have a pet but won't spend time with it.  In a way it is as much mistreatment as cosmetic testing or bull killing; less, but it goes on for years and years.

          Likewise the bullfighting; seeing such a spectacle holds absolutely no interest for me.  It is cruel and needless to kill an animal in such a fashion.  Now, maybe I don't understand the bull, maybe it enjoys the fight and accepts the end when it comes, but I still don't like it.

          It just isn't my place to tell another country they have to stop their national sport because I find it inhumane.

          1. profile image0
            SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            I see your points. In Canada it gets really cold and some people leave their dogs out in freezing weather. I have talked with some of the neighbours about it because there are laws. They can't just do what they want with their dog. One dog was tethered in the yard with no shelter or water-a puppy. I gave the dog water and gave the neighbour a pamphlet on the cruelty of tethering. I feel bad for your neighbour's dog. Maybe somebody should slip him a pamphlet in his mail box or the number for a dog walking service. If it is done without condemning the person they are more likely to listen. Sometimes people don't know any better. The worst thing a person can do is act all high and mighty and condemn because the person just gets their back up. Just like cultures, a person isn't all bad because they do bad things. A man might lose his temper and hit his wife (or visa-versa) because that's what he learned from his dad. People live what they learn but people can also change and forgive themselves and do things in a better way.



            Sometimes people are out of line too. So it is important to not just jump to conclusions. If a dog is whining it doesn't mean he is being abused.

  6. Charlu profile image83
    Charluposted 4 years ago

    It is because of people and celebrities taking a stand and helping others that female mutilation is slowly becoming less exercised, women of different cultures are beginning to believe in themselves, take a stand, and not accept the abuse by beginning to support their families on their own. 

    If it were not for those who are willing to sacrifice their time and money to help others (including animals), this country and several others would be in a lot worse shape than it is today.

    That is in my opinion what is being brought forth in the world today with the " What's in it for me attitude?" 

    Selfless acts of kindness to all creatures of this world will result in only great things for those who choose to give, as someone else has once done for me. If we choose to keep terrorizing, mutilating, and killing that which was given as a life support system I can only imagine what we have seen, is a small preview of what is yet to come.

    1. profile image0
      SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Wow, excellent points Charlu.

    2. wilderness profile image94
      wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      "If we choose to keep terrorizing, mutilating, and killing that which was given as a life support system I can only imagine what we have seen, is a small preview of what is yet to come."

      As in the chicken and turkey farms in the US?  The egg laying factories?  The slaughter houses for cattle?  The fur trade?  Animal testing for cosmetics; hurting live creatures for nothing more than a paste to cover pimples? 

      Bad enough that we cause harm for medical improvements, but for nothing but vanity?  How about killing wolves or other predators because we want their space? 

      Maybe we'd better direct our outrage to our own practices before looking at other countries and their picayune "wrongs" to pick on.  The US is no better than most countries.

      1. profile image0
        SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        But with all the backlash, people don't buy cosmetics that are tested on animals and companies have been forced to be humane. I only buy dolphin safe tuna. I buy free range eggs. Temple Grandin designed areas for animals to decrease their suffering when they are led to slaughter. She eased the suffering; she understood. I agree that we should look in our own backyards too. That's how the world improves.

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          As you recognize, it is your own backyard.  You have every right to make changes there, to whatever you think is right.  There are still limits, mostly when no one (or animal) is intentionally harmed or tortured, but in general it is your right.

          You do not have that same right in a different culture, a different nation, a different people.  They have their own idea of what is right, and it is just as good as your own idea.  We do tend to interfere in "human rights" violations (and sometimes go too far IMHO) but a declaration that a national sport is "wrong" is definitely going too far.

          1. profile image0
            SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            I do think the sport of bullfighting is wrong because it is animal abuse. I'm not putting down the entire culture of Spain. These days it seems like the you can't criticize an aspect of a culture because if you do, you are accused of lambasting the entire culture. A lot of cruel things are done in the name of tradition and culture and I think that there has to be basic human and animal rights laws that usurp culture. Some people argue that genital mutiliation is cultural thing but that's too bad. Cultures have to evolve and change. Culture can't be above the law. Sharia law can't be put above the US constitution for example. And in the world, all the people have to realize that we all live on this planet together. We are all tied to each other; we don't live in a bubble. I do think it is important for people to be able to speak up and discuss things and debate.

            In Canada (I don't what it is like in the States) I found that debate (in many of my experiences) was not tolerated. At University, in many situations, you would get in trouble for speaking up. In one course, we had to read these poems and one of the older students said the poems were depressing and some even laughed. They questioned the characters, "Why don't they change their profession if everyone keeps drowning in the sea?" There were non-stop wakes in the poem with people wailing. The professor became very upset and silenced the students and told them that they were not being respectful. Or in a group discussion a person would suddenly want to take a vote and would get everyone else to raise their hand to silence opposition. Adults were doing this. So if you disagreed with a point, the loud mouth of the group would say, "Okay fine, who agrees that we should do such and such? Okay, you're outvoted, next". Often the people voting would vote reluctantly too because they were intimidated by the loud mouth.

            I do thing people have the right to question different cultures and I don't think that other ideas are just as good; no, not when those ideas violate human rights and animal rights. Isn't there basic rules for treating prisoners for example (The Geneva Convention). Isn't there international humanitarian law?

            1. wilderness profile image94
              wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              I don't see debate really encouraged at the college level, either.  Seems that for the most part if you're not quite liberal you views aren't appreciated - that you are better off just keeping your mouth shut.

              I think debate on this kind of thing (bullfighting) is good.  It raises awareness, including inside Spain, of what others see in the sport and will extend past bullfighting to animal cruelty of all kinds even if it isn't specifically mentioned.

              The only problem is then deciding that everyone needs to write the Spaniards and tell them what horrible people they are; that they are unethical and immoral for allowing such a thing to go on (from the OP).  At that point we've crossed the line in our own morality - we've ignored the idea of live and let live in favor of spreading our thoughts on what is, in the larger picture, a pretty minor "offense".  You really can't force morality on people - as soon as they're out of sight or get their backs up they'll revert right back to what they were doing.  Instead it will take time and lots of gentle pressure to gradually change them person by person, whereupon the nation will do it themselves if it's going to change at all.  Gentle pressure as in public debate, not as in letters of condemnation.

              1. profile image0
                SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Good points. Trashing the entire Spanish culture is wrong but letting Spain know how they are perceived because of bullfighting is good because they want tourist dollars. Even if they are not motivated because of animals rights, they have be motivated to change for other reasons. Like companies not testing on animals because people stopped buying their products.

                It is awareness and questioning the way things are done. It is okay to change. It is not trashing tradition but revamping tradition, remodeling it. The bullfighting days are done. Nobody has to trash the people and the matadors. The matadors can evolve rather than sticking to the old guard that doesn't fit anymore. Like a company that embraces change instead of being of the mindset that doesn't want to use a computer or get a new filing system. People won't look down on Spain but will admire them for growing and evolving.

                1. wilderness profile image94
                  wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  There you go again; the Spanish people "have to be motivated to change" so their activities will conform to what you think is right.

                  How about if the Spanish people "motivate" you to conform to their ideas of what is right?  Kind of puts it all in a different light, doesn't it?

                  1. profile image0
                    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Not all Spanish people; the law makers.

              2. profile image0
                SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Good points. Trashing the entire Spanish culture is wrong but letting Spain know how they are perceived because of bullfighting is good because they want tourist dollars. Even if they are not motivated because of animals rights, they have be motivated to change for other reasons. Like companies not testing on animals because people stopped buying their products.

                It is awareness and questioning the way things are done. It is okay to change. It is not trashing tradition but revamping tradition, remodeling it. The bullfighting days are done. Nobody has to trash the people and the matadors. The matadors can evolve rather than sticking to the old guard that doesn't fit anymore. Like a company that embraces change instead of being of the mindset that doesn't want to use a computer or get a new filing system. People won't look down on Spain but will admire them for growing and evolving.

  7. Charlu profile image83
    Charluposted 4 years ago

    As you have pointed out the enormous amount of things we (the U.S.) need to fix should definitely be a priority, but I can only hope that we would also concentrate on the amount of elderly abuse, hunger, etc.

    A point that you fail to realize is what other countries do, whether it is a result of their culture or a way to make more money affects us beyond what we care to realize.  Probably my number one example would be the pink slime in hamburger meat and other beef that Mc Donalds, other fast food chains, and grocery stores were buying from Europe.  This stopped only as a result of a celebrity (tipped off by an employee) who literally took samples from the burgers they were serving and had them analyzed. Even though they denied the accusations in the beginning, they stated once caught in the act they would stop buying beef from Europe.  Then take a look at the lead based paints China used to make children toys There are a vast amount of other products from cosmetics, produce, meat, and other materials that we consume because the "large corporate dollar" is worth more in some eyes, than the health and welfare of the people in this country. This is not only very sad but a fact of life.

    Until the people of this country take a stand letting others know exactly some of the practices that other countries and the US commit leaving us at risk, NONE of it will stop. Like it or not most of our consumed foods, appliances, supplies, etc, etc, etc, come from other countries and for us to not at least monitor how they are made would leave us all subject to massive disease, illness, and death. 

    When I think of the unbelievable amount of cattle ranches close to where I live that have gone out of business as a result of this fact, and  produce growers who have done the same it makes you wonder where we are headed, and the priorities on the list.

    1. profile image0
      SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      So true, we are all connected.

  8. profile image0
    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago

    This is what the form letter says:

    Dear Mr. Ambassador,

    I am very concerned to learn that the Spanish government is considering legislation to protect and promote bullfighting, a move that could allow public funds to be used to support the industry.

    Bullfighting is a cruel, outdated spectacle that causes great suffering.

    Spain is a modern civilized country with a wealth of treasures: art, architecture, and music, to name just a few. Many people from around the world enjoy visiting Spain and experiencing its rich heritage.

    By supporting and protecting the outdated cruel pastime of bullfighting, your government risks tarnishing its reputation and leaving a terrible legacy for future generations.

    The torment and death of animals for amusement, or for cultural reasons, can never be acceptable.

    The world is watching: By taking a compassionate stance against this cruel pastime and agreeing not to declare it cultural heritage nor support it with public funds, your government would surely win the hearts of citizens around the world.

    Please pass my comments on to your government.

    Kind regards,

  9. profile image0
    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago

    Article:

    http://english.pravda.ru/society/anomal … ighting-0/

    "As the Spanish Parliament debates a proposed new law to declare bullfighting a cultural heritage, an Ipsos MORI public opinion poll commissioned by Humane Society International reveals that the majority of Spaniards do not approve of public funds being used for the bloodsport and that three quarters of the population haven't attended a bullfight in the last five years. Only 29 percent of Spanish people support bullfighting, according to poll results"

    "A legislative proposal supported by bullfighting enthusiasts to protect and promote bullfighting nationwide is being debated by the Culture Committee before being voted on by the Senate and then the Congress. If passed, public money could be used to fund and promote this bloody spectacle in which bulls are tormented and stabbed repeatedly until death in a bullfighting ring".

    Obviously the Spanish people don't want bullfighting but they need help from the outside world so the minority doesn't push through a law that the majority of Spanish people do not want. Sometimes people need outside support.

  10. profile image0
    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago

    Another article:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2013 … lonia.html

    What people are saying:

    "Spanish bullfighting defended on cultural grounds.---"What a barbaric culture it is, then"

    "To Spanish:
    You have a beautiful country to show to the whole world. You don't need this brutal show to attract people to visiting you. Use the name of tradition/culture is no excuse for torture those poor animal to their death"

    "Just because something was a part of a "culture" in the past doesn't mean has to be in the future.

    It's disgusting, inhumane, and cruel at best.

    "To inflict cruelties on defenseless creatures, or condone such acts, is to abuse one of the cardinal tenets of a civilized society - reverence for life. ~ Jon Evans"


    "This is not culture. Call it what it is; state condoned torture".

    "As someone partly of Spanish background, I say "If this is true, then something is wrong with Spanish culture."
    Bullfighting is a bloody symbol of human power over an innocent animal where the outcome has been pre-determined i.e. the bull will die.
    "

  11. profile image0
    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago

    If Spain disregards want the majority of people in the country want and if they don't listen to public outcry nobody will want to visit Spain. They will be shooting themselves in the foot as they stubbornly cling to the past that a few want to  preserve.

    That is why public outcry is essential so the government can weight the pros and the cons. It will cost them money in the end and it will sully their reputation if they just pass a law that nobody wants that tortures animals.

    1. profile image0
      SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      That's what I think.

    2. profile image0
      SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      If the Spanish law makers disregard...

      1. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I rather doubt that allowing bullfights will affect tourist traffic much.  At the most, tourists just won't watch the bullfight, but they probably aren't anyway.  Or if they are watching those spectacles, they will no longer visit Spain if banned, resulting in a loss of tourism, not a gain.

        I just don't think very many people at all will boycott a country because of a morality disagreement.  Were it shoved in their face as they walk down the street it would be different, but those demonstrations of cruelty are in inside a stadium and not visible to the casual tourist.

        1. profile image0
          SandCastlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I think public outcry can make a difference. You have a right to your opinion; I disagree. It is up to everyone to speak up for those who can not speak up for themselves in any way one can. To have a fatalistic view, 'it won't make a difference' is often used an excuse not to act.

          I think allowing bullfighting will affect tourism. People are more conscious of animal rights these days. If they have to choose between two places, they might just decide not to choose Spain. And the people who travel the most and who have the most money often are the most vocal about animal rights (ie: celebrities). If the law is passed there will be a public outcry and likely Spain will be boycotted as a place to visit. Just because you can't see the bullfights doesn't mean you don't know they exist. A tree still falls in the forest even if nobody sees it. People are aware. It will make a huge difference to tourism if the law is passed.

          And most of people in Spain don't even agree with bullfighting anyway; it is a few who are pushing it. So it is up to the people of Spain to speak against bullfighting. They are the ones who can make the biggest difference. But every voice helps I think. Because bullfighting isn't simply a sport, it is a blood sport, a violent blood sport. Just like Gladiator fights don't fit anymore or bear baiting. In many ways, people are becoming more rights conscious. And being conscious of animal and people rights can never stop and speaking up can never stop.

  12. profile image0
    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago

    http://action.peta.org.uk/ea-action/act … n.id=20036

    This is another address to use to make your voice heard.

  13. wilderness profile image94
    wildernessposted 4 years ago

    Could we get the rules of bullfighting changed? 

    http://www.adn.com/2013/03/31/2847131/t … -2013.html   (can't post a pic - copyright)

  14. profile image0
    SandCastlesposted 4 years ago

    Charles Ramsey got involved. He didn't just look away. How many people would have just turned a blind eye and said, "It's not my business".

 
working