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For Pit Bull Parents

  1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
    Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago

    Tell us a little about your Pit, why you love them/this breed so much.

    I have a tan and white Pit Bull named Bowser, He'll be 10 months old may 10th. He's such a sweet loving boy. He's so silly and goofy I can't help but smile when I see him. He is the first pit i've owned and because of him I have started speaking out on behalf of Pit Bulls everywhere. I love this missunderstood breed, they are wonderful dogs.

  2. k@ri profile image83
    k@riposted 7 years ago

    I don't currently have a Pit, but I have in the past.  People are wrong to outlaw these dogs.  They are loyal and willing to please.  Only my lab was more so!!  Pit Bulls are loving dogs, I do not understand why they are so vilified!

  3. thranax profile image50
    thranaxposted 7 years ago

    Pit Bulls are only bad named because of there bite is so powerful. Due to that, man has altered many of these poor souls into fighting everything that comes near them. Pit Bulls learn what they are being exposed to, any many have bad owners that may be abusive to them, purposely or by accident. A dog under those conditions and with a bite so strong is a deadly combination!

    ~thranax~

  4. k@ri profile image83
    k@riposted 7 years ago

    I agree, it is the conditions, not the dog that call for remedy!  Pit Bulls are very nice family dogs...they just have a bad name.  They are actually very loyal and loving.  As I say, only my lab was more so.  I have had many dogs in my life, and most were not as eager to please as my pit!

  5. k@ri profile image83
    k@riposted 7 years ago

    I had a 2 year old as a neighbor.  My pit would sit down whenever that girl came to vist.  My pit would not move whenever that child was in reach.  When the child came to pet her, she would shiver in pleasure.  These dogs are GOOD!  It is the owners who are bad!

  6. Eternal Evolution profile image85
    Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago

    Pit Bulls don't nesaceraly have a stronger bite than other dogs, they just have a very high determination to hold on and not let go once they do bite. Some interesting facts to check out are in one of my hubs, Pit Bulls: Behind The Jaws.

    http://hubpages.com/hub/Pit-Bulls-Behind-The-Jaws

    1. Everyday Miracles profile image93
      Everyday Miraclesposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I thought that *all* terriers had a stronger bite than "other dogs" (regardless of size -- I'm a pit lover!). I was once told this by a vet when I was pregnant and considering a dog.

      1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
        Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I have not read that terriers have the strongest bit, i'm not saying that it's untrue, just that i haven't heard/read that. There is no accurate way to test which breeds have the strongest bite. I do know that i had a Boston Terrier and once he bit onto a toy rope he would NOT let go no matter what. I don't think that terriers have a stronger bite, they just have the determinaion to hold on. But thats just my person opinion.

  7. Everyday Miracles profile image93
    Everyday Miraclesposted 7 years ago

    IIRC, the vet said that a terrier has the ability to lock it's jaw around whatever thing it is that it is biting down on, thereby making a terrier bite more dangerous than a bite from, say, a Collie.

    I have nothing against terriers in general, but I do see this as a potential risk to both dog and owner if the owner isn't aware of this ability or prepared to intercede should the dog become agitated and prepared to bite. Even very small dogs (including a story I read about a dachshund) can do significant damage to a human. Breed has nothing to do with it. I love pits too smile

  8. Eternal Evolution profile image85
    Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago

    No dog has the ability to lock it's jaw. Locking jaws in any dog is a myth and phisicaly impossible. That is a proven fact. Again terrier have the determination to not let go, but they do not lock their jaws. A terrier bite is more dangerous because of this will to bite and not release, but they do not lock onto anything. It's simply impossible.

  9. Everyday Miracles profile image93
    Everyday Miraclesposted 7 years ago

    I wonder why the vet told us that? Interesting. Thanks for the info!

  10. Eternal Evolution profile image85
    Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago

    It is weid that he toldyou that, but locking jaws, particulary in pits is a common myth. Thanks for replying to this forum big_smile

  11. profile image59
    Motherhood Trialsposted 7 years ago

    either by determination or ability to lock their jaw..latching on and not letting go would cause the same results. If this is in their nature, even though their nature may be good in other ways, it is still a danger to concider. We have a golden retr. And one day I saw him with something in his mouth hanging out. I said in a normal tone JAKE come here! I held my hand out in front of his nose when I saw it was a young(or small) bird.With my hand out,I said GIVE ME THAT. Jake dropped the bird in my hand and it sat still. In about 3sec. it shook its feathers and flew away. Jake was not trained to do anything but sit and shake your hand.Just a pet. But a pet with an extreamly gentle and obedient nature.I am sorry to have to say to you but I would prefer my childs arm near Jakes mouth way befor I would concider it near a terriers any day. : )

    1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
      Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      First off they can't lock their jaw, no dog can, it' phisicaly impossible. And a pit bull is extreamly eager to pleas it's owner, thus if told to let go they would do so. Just because they have the determination to not let go doesn't mean that they wont. Also APBT score around an 84% passing score on the American Temperament Test, which is higher than breeds such as labs, spaniels, golden retriver and other popular breeds, thus making them statisticaly less likely to bite than the other breeds. Before you pass judgment and condem and breed of dog please do some research.

      http://www.edba.org.au/myths.html

      http://www.atts.org/index.html

      http://www.pitbulllovers.com/

      http://www.realpitbull.com/

    2. candice5 profile image61
      candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      No one is going to like my answer, But here goes anyway.
      In my Country Pit Bulls, are owned by the scum of the Earth generally. A few exceptions, but why would anyone find they needed a Dog like that, it is about Power. They are weak so need the powerful dog. They attack at random, you cannot take away that instinct, but you can make it worse.
      I have just looked at a Photo of a Pit that has had to be put down, he is a sweet little pup covered in mange, prognosis was that he was very ill, and his immune system was buggered.
      Some creep had him wearing a red scarf tyed around his neck.He was found wandering, so I guess he was at least able to be helped out of his misery by a Vet.
      He would have still been drinking from the Mother. So somewher there is a family of pups all in the same condition, with a sick Mother. It is considered that he is a Gang dog. Anyone that joins a Gang is a W....r and I would love to be able to have just 2 hours in a Closed room with the jerk that owned him , and a couple of appropriately filled needles. smile

      1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
        Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        In your country pit bulls may be owned by the scum of the earth, but to lable all pit bulls and their owners that way is unfair. Any dog can turn, any dog can be mean, any dog can attack and it is not in a pit bulls nature to be this way. true they do come from a history of dog fighting, however they were bread to have NO human agression. Any dog showing any signs of human agression was put down and never bread from. People mix pit bulls with all kinds of dogs most "pit bulls" are not american pit bull terriers or even american staffordshire terriers. they are mongrals that look similur to pit bulls, they are not actual pit bulls and do not display the typical friendly tempermen of a true pit bull.

        1. candice5 profile image61
          candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Did I not say all the things that you are throwing back at me, Sure all dogs can turn. Certainly in my Country no one very classy would have a Pit Bull Terrier, they are obviously veiwed entirely differently. They are likely to be a banned species here. Can't say I'll miss them.

        2. candice5 profile image61
          candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          No these are imported, and cost huge amounts, they are the same dogs as yours, I guess the odd mongrel gets in. But these have papers.

          1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
            Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            even if they are imported that doesn't mean they are true pit bulls. even some with papers are poorly bread. if a particular "breeder" is breeding game pit bulls for fighting a true fighting pit should still have no human agression. Somewhere down the lines a pit displaying human agression most likely has some other breed mixed into it. Thats the bigest problem with pits, ppl mix them with other breeds to get bigger meaner dogs.

            1. candice5 profile image61
              candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

              They are the same dog. ZAll the attributes are correct I am a breeder of German Shepherds, I know what to look for in any Dog competitively.

              1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
                Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                I have a question then...judging by his physical attributes is my dog (the one in my display) a true pit bull?

                1. candice5 profile image61
                  candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

                  Difficult to say without seeing him, checking height body type etc., he looks a good dog. But you can't tell from a Photo. He looks like he would be a genuine pit bull terrier. I have a friend that breeds red noses. She said this one looks the real deal.

                  1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
                    Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                    Bowser, my pit bull, is NOT a true pit bull. He has all the physical as well as temperment traits that an APBT has. He falls into the height and weight range as well, however he is not an APBT. He is a cross between APBT and an American Bulldog. Because he is mixed i always use the term pit bull, if he was a true pit i would always put APBT. Just because a dogs looks the part of a Pit Bull doesn't make it a true pit. I would assume many of the pit bulls there are not true pits either. You can't judge a book by it's cover, and you can't judge a pit based on looks alone. Again APBT have NO human agression what so ever.

                    http://www.atts.org/stats1.html

                    http://www.pitbullsontheweb.com/petbull/findpit.html

  12. Whitney05 profile image63
    Whitney05posted 7 years ago

    I have a blue and white APBT. She was diagnosed with bone cancer at 17 months old. She had 2 tumors in her right front leg, which is only seen in about 1 in every 10 dogs with bone cancer. She's gone through 2 surgeries- 1) that included removing the larger tumor for biopsy and 2) for amputation. She's had 6 chemo treatments- 2 before amputation bc we were waiting until she showed pain to amputate, as it is a pain reliever that can cause metastasis of cancer cells in her body. She has been on a special diet and other medications since then. She will be 2 years old in June.

    Here are some old pictures of MIA before she was diagnosed and underwent surgery to remove the right front leg.

    Here are 2 more hubs I've written about the breed. I have many others though. E.M. you'll find these hubs especially important to read, especially the myth-busters one, as you'll find out all the myths you've heard and apparently your vet has told you are probably wrong. Personally, if your vet told you that, you should find a better vet, as he doesn't know much about dogs.
    Myths about APBTs
    Dog attacks in regards to APBTs

    I have had a fawn and white APBT in the past, he was stolen at 4 months old while under the watch of a friend of a friend of my ex. Not too thrilled about that, especially as he had a stage 4 bi-lateral heart murmur. He wasn't the most responsible person.

    I have also worked with a good number of dogs that were APBT or mixes thereof.

    Why do I love the breed?
    1. Loyalty
    2. Courage
    3. Determination
    4. Passion
    5. Intelligent
    6. Plain gorgeous
    7. Typically not prone to any health problems (although I did not give any good examples, as both of mine have been sick). The breed was not bred for any particular physical trait, such as a smushed nose, short legs, whatever, so back in the day they were bred to be bred for fighting dogs. People didn't care what they looked like. They weren't nearly as inbred as any other dog breed, which is why they're one of the few with no prone health problems.

    1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
      Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      How is MIA doing? It really bothers me that she has cancer, it's so sad. I can only imagine how u feel, my dogs are like children to me and i can tell that you truly love and care for your's very much. I wish you and MIA the best of luck, i hope she gets better.

  13. profile image59
    Motherhood Trialsposted 7 years ago

    Look, I never said they could lock their jaw, I only commented on what has been stated in this forum. What I said was that it did not matter to me whatever the reason. Most dogs are eager to please their owners and are often refered to as mans best friend for that reason reguardless of their breed. I do not think that ALL terriers are vicious nor do I think there is any one breed that is ALLways friendly. No one has passed judgement or condemmed that breed I only stated my opinion and gave a personal experience as to why. Pits do have a reputation wether it be justified or not and as a parent I would be one to concider such and Im sure you will find others who may not. But I am speaking for myself personally and if you noticed I did not single out Pits , I said Terriers as there are more than APB under that breed. I have Nothing aginst any of them and It bothers me to see a good pet put down just because of his breed and not his own bad behaivor. Just because a person may not share your love for that particular breed for whatever reason doesnt mean that they would outlaw them because of it.smile

    1. Whitney05 profile image63
      Whitney05posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Did you know that APBTs were once deemed as nanny dogs and were used to protect children? They were also one of the most loved dogs a few decades back- with a reputation that a lab has now. Just curious if you knew this. It's not that you should be worried about having an APBT or a mix thereof as a pet with children, it's that you should be worried about having ANY dog or mixbreed as a pet. Dogs and children should both be trained and socialized with each other.

      Terrier is not a breed. It's a classification of several breeds, and the way you speak, it sounds like you're saying my Yorkshire Terrier poses the same threat to your children as my American Pit Bull Terrier, which just isn't true. Although my Yorkie is much more temperamental than my APBT. And, even small dogs have been reported at ganging up and mauling small children.

      Experience is not necessarily fact, so determination in your case, doesn't mean that that dog or any dog has locking jaws. Just pure determination not to let go.

      By the way, my American Pit Bull Terrier would have had the same response as your golden retriever with the bird. She releases on command. It's responsibility and training that's the key... Not breed.

      By the way there have been many reports and incidents of Golden Retrievers mauling children.

      That was not to sound rude or to sound badly because of your differing opinion. Just thought you should know, so please do not get an attitude as we are just trying to explain to you the truths, as it seems as though you're pretty set on not seeing any side except "'pit bulls' are mean and bad and I'd never trust any child with them." Just what I've heard, especially being so defensive about the topic when people are trying to defend the breed.

  14. Specificity profile image60
    Specificityposted 7 years ago

    I don't have a dog in this fight (Pun!), but I have often wondered about Pitbulls.  I can remember when the German Shepard was the dog to fear (30 years ago), then the Doberman (20 years ago), then the Wrotweiler (10 years ago), now it's the Pitbull.  In light of that, I realize this could just be the phobia du jour.

    On the other hand, I have seen very few instances of labs and retreivers seriously mauling or killing someone.  Even if well-trained and well-behaved, is it true that the pitbull is potentially more dangerous to have around the house than other breeds?

    1. Whitney05 profile image63
      Whitney05posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      You are correct that there have been so many breeds that have once had the same bad rap as the Pit Bull has now, but they are now loved. Pit Bulls once were loved dogs and now feared. For the most part that is media portrayal, as explained in my dog attack hub (link below). Although, the breed can be very dangerous, they are not necessarily more dangerous than a rottweiler, german shepherd, or retriever. They are just more determined. A well trained and socialized APBT will obey their owner. These dogs are great indoor dogs and wonderful around kids, as long as they are trained and socialized well. I have a handicapped younger brother who is both mentally and physically handicapped, and my APBT gets along wonderfully with him, as have the others that I've brought around him that didn't grow up around him.

      Myths about APBTs
      Dog attacks in regards to APBTs- includes info about statistics and reports as well as other breeds.

      Oh, and on when researching my BSL hub, I found reports showing where in countries and counties that have had dog bans in places for years, even decades, have not had any significant change in attacks or bites.

  15. Whitney05 profile image63
    Whitney05posted 7 years ago

    She's doing well. She's recouped the amputation wonderfully, although there are a few days that she'll watch her step a little closer than others. When she runs, though, you can't even tell she's missing a leg. So far her chest x-rays have come back good to go, but we'll have keep doing the xrays every three months to watch for metastasis. she'll pretty much have a 50/50 shot at living 1 year, and even though I've spent literally thousands for surgeries, chemo treatments, medications, supplements, and a new diet, one year is worth that money.

    1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
      Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I'm glad to here that she's doing better. She is very lucky to have you as an owner. I hope she beats the odds and hares many wondeful years with you.

  16. trish1048 profile image79
    trish1048posted 7 years ago

    Bless you Whitney.  Although I'm sorry for Mia's condition, she is an exceptionally lucky dog to have such a caring, responsible owner smile
    I once had a pit bull, his name was Chaz.  He was sweet, funny and so affectionate.  His one bad habit was he'd pick up any inanimate object and run with it.  He once had a garden rake that he was running around the yard with, then another time he tried to take my rain spouts off the side of my house.  When it came to people, he was simply a love.  He would often sit in a chair next to me when I was at my computer and rest his head on my arm.  Unforeseen circumstances caused me to have to move, so I found a home for him with a lovely family who had a female pit bull.

    1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
      Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Chaz sounds like a great pit. Sounds like he's just a silly as my Bowser. I'm glad you were able to find him another home, hope he likes his new pit fiend big_smile

  17. Bob Cedar profile image65
    Bob Cedarposted 7 years ago

    My boy is 3 years old, named Tex.
    <<that's him
    He's goofy, friendly, smart, obedient, and cool like that. big_smile
    When I take him for walks he smiles and wags his tell at everybody we pass by. He loves going to the many dog friendly parks here in Austin.

    1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
      Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Awww he's pretty! Sounds a lot like my dog Bowser.

  18. Bob Cedar profile image65
    Bob Cedarposted 7 years ago

    Thank you. LOL did you name Bowser after Mario's arch-nemesis?

    1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
      Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yes We named him off of mario lol. Me and my boyfried are nerds! hahah. If he has a son we're gonna call him Kupa lol tongue

  19. Bob Cedar profile image65
    Bob Cedarposted 7 years ago

    Sweet. And sometime in the future, a Goomba? tongue

  20. Everyday Miracles profile image93
    Everyday Miraclesposted 7 years ago

    Would one of you consider doing a hub on choosing a Pit Bull breeder?

  21. Bob Cedar profile image65
    Bob Cedarposted 7 years ago

    I wouldn't. Look at a shelter before a breeder. You'll find a great dog there! big_smile Also the only reason to go to a breeder is for a show dog and that's because show's like all the fancy paperwork.

  22. Whitney05 profile image63
    Whitney05posted 7 years ago

    I have a hub on choosing a Pit Bull puppy, but it can also can be a good read for choosing any puppy from a breeder or shelter. There is a breeder section in it with info about reading pedigrees and choosing a responsible breeder.

    I will try to throw something together about breeders though...

    Like Bob said, there are MANY APBTs and mixes in shelters. If you want a purbred, and can't find one at a regular dog/cat shelter, you can consider a breed specific rescue; they'll have more restrictions for adopting, but you'll usually have a few good choices. Plus at a breed specific rescue the dogs are temperament tested so that the workers and volunteers know what type of home each dog needs specifically. That way you will have a better idea of whether the dog you're interested in would fit you and your lifestyle.

    Bob, don't forget other competitions like the fancy paperwork too. Typically, dogs need to be registered in order to compete in official weight pulling competitions and whatnot.

    1. Bob Cedar profile image65
      Bob Cedarposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      True. I got ahead of myself on that one.

      1. Whitney05 profile image63
        Whitney05posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I've done a good bit of research on it, and can't wait to get started whenever I get a new pup, which won't be for a while. And of course when the pup is of proper age.



        I wish that non-registered APBTs could compete officially in weight pulls, but everything I've ever read says they must be registered with whatever kennel club is holding the event. It's something I wanted to do with my current APBT, but my dad said no, but it's something that I'll do with the next... I'd rather adopt, but I really want to compete and it's something I'm willing to spend the time and money on. I just bought 2 ADBA mags that features Weight Pulling articles. Can't wait to read them.

        I found this on a book description about debunking bite statistics and whatnot. It's from "Dogs Bite: But Balloons and Slippers Are More Dangerous" by Janis Bradley. I'm about to purchase the book.

        1. Bob Cedar profile image65
          Bob Cedarposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Don't you also need the paper regarding Hip Dysplasia test?

  23. Everyday Miracles profile image93
    Everyday Miraclesposted 7 years ago

    Bit Whitney, didn't you say before (I think in one of your hubs) that you wouldn't get a Pit from a shelter due to not knowing about their history? Unfortunately I have to agree with that because of perceptions about this dog.

    We are probably going to wind up getting another dog because our daughter loves them. It will be in a few years but we're trying to make a good choice. My husband is a bit of a "snob" and we've had bad luck with shelters (yes, she's spayed! and a few months later along come the kittens *sigh* -- the vet never told us better).

    And BTW, if we *do* get another (purebred) dog, I'm definitely considering showing.

    1. Whitney05 profile image63
      Whitney05posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Not necessarily. You may not know the history, but it's usually more of a problem if you aren't experienced and if you don't really know what you're doing. Most of the "problem" dogs or bait dogs that end up at shelters are going to be visibly scarred as well as mentally. But there's nothing wrong with adopting a pup or young adult. But, most of the time they will temperament test certain breeds, especially at breed specific rescues.

      I do remember saying that, but I think there was more to the context than never adopt a bully breed from a shelter bc you don't know the history. If that is all that I said, then I need to correct that. But I'm not sure where I said it.

      It is very expensive to show a dog. The dog alone is going to be thousands in order to get a true champion dog. You're not going to be able to spend a few hundred and then get a best in show.

  24. Everyday Miracles profile image93
    Everyday Miraclesposted 7 years ago

    Sorry Whitney, I don't remember where you said it either, but I do remember it seeming like an across-the-board statement.

    We probably wouldn't be purchasing a pit (not my husband's favorite breed) but I'd still be interested in your thoughts.

  25. Whitney05 profile image63
    Whitney05posted 7 years ago

    I just skimmed the article I posted earlier and it wasn't there that I could see... But I don't think I'll be posting another one about breeders, as I think I covered a good bit of choosing a reputable breeder in that hub. I'm not sure what more I could add to make a full hub. If I can think of something I will compose one.

    I know many APBT's who have been adopted, some even bait dogs with multiple wounds and broken bones when they were brought in and some emaciated near to death with ingrown logging chains around their neck. They are both in wonderful homes, but these two dogs alone would not be able to go to regular homes. They needed experienced owners, even though they do have perfect temperaments towards people.

    It is always better to know the history on a dog, especially powerful bully breeds, but that doesn't mean that you should never adopt one.

    If you opt to show any breed, it's still going to cost thousands to get a truly nice champion individual. I know a lady who breeds champion show, obedience, and retrieving labs, who go for over $1,000 each, and unless she believes the pup has the potential to win competitions, she makes all buyers spay/neuter after 1 year old or first heat. It's in a contract they sign. Not all breeders are as strict, but there are many who are like that.

  26. Everyday Miracles profile image93
    Everyday Miraclesposted 7 years ago

    $1000 is honestly less than I would anticipate spending on a pure bred dog, even one of pet quality. For a long time we talked about opening a cattery (can't do it! I don't want to breed, just show!) and a show quality cat in the breed I was looking at was $1200. Dogs generally run higher. I've done some research. DH's breed is Rotties and the show quality animals I was looking at were more than double that.

    I know that the bit I was talking about wasn't in the article you posted here because I hadn't read that one yet. I hadn't even encountered it yet. I read the one about MIA and a couple of others last week and I wonder if that's not where I got it, though I'm not sure.

    Are you going to be posting any more recent pictures of her?

    1. Whitney05 profile image63
      Whitney05posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      $1,000 is the cheap side, but again that's just pet quality from champion lines. She usually has waiting lists for her dogs. She's not in it for the money. The APBT's I once looked at were about $2500-$3000+ for UKC show pups. I'd love a weight pull pup. I have knee problems which is why I'd rather weight pull, but I wouldn't mind training agility, but wouldn't be able to get out and run with them, just train basic obstacles. (Hmm maybe I can convince my bf to let me agility train his boxer whenever he gets one and have him run the course haha put him to work a little.)

      I'll have to check the one about MIA. I don't think it'd be in that one... I'll check it out.

      I would like to post updated pictures of her, but my dad feels that since she's had her leg amputated, he wants to keep the pictures in house for now. The newest pictures I have of her are on my dog cancer guide hub.

  27. Everyday Miracles profile image93
    Everyday Miraclesposted 7 years ago

    Understandable, Whitney.

    The pull is interesting to me. I was involved in doing forum reviews for a while and I reviewed a site that dealt with that subject. Fascinating!

  28. Janet21 profile image62
    Janet21posted 7 years ago

    Where I live owners tend to let their dogs run around the neighborhood. My kids are always outside playing and I don't want to have to constantly worry about them.  Two of my neighbors have Pits and they just walk onto my yard and on other peoples yards.  It scares me. More so with the Pits, here is why,

    1.  My neighbor brought her Pit to the bus stop (not cool) and when my husband came out to the stop to tell me something, the Pit went nuts and started growling badly showing lots of teeth.   My neighbor who is small could barely hold him back.

    2.  Same neighbor walking different Pit.  I was driving and stopped for a moment to chat.  Dog was growling and showing teeth.  It was so bad, we had to end our conversation.

    3.  Someone was walking their dog down the street and this neighbor's Pit was again unleashed and growling at the lady and her dog.  She was really scared.  My husband was driving down the road at the time and put the car between the Pit and the lady and her dog, so she could get out of there.

    3.  Other neighbors Pit.  Came into my front yard and attacked a fawn.  The fawn was screaming so badly we ran outside to see what was happening. The fawn got away.  I don't know how hurt it was.

    These situations have left a very bad taste in my mouth as far as Pits go.  However, I am sure they are not all bad, but my experience with them has not been good.  Could just be the owners, I don't know.

    1. Bob Cedar profile image65
      Bob Cedarposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      All of those instances could happen with other dogs, not Pit specific. It's all in the upbringing. My neighbor has a little weiner dog that acts all kinds of crazy barking and growling. My boy just sits there being goofy wagging his tail thinking it's all good.

      1. Janet21 profile image62
        Janet21posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I agree.  That is why I pointed out in my post that I am not saying all Pits are bad, just the ones I have encountered.  My personal experience with this breed has not been good and that is really all I have to go by.

  29. Bob Cedar profile image65
    Bob Cedarposted 7 years ago

    Stop by my apartment after work and come hang out with Tex tongue

  30. Whitney05 profile image63
    Whitney05posted 7 years ago

    I'm not sure. I know they need to appear healthy and are looked at before being allowed to compete. I haven't seen anything about hip dysplasia testing.

  31. profile image59
    aptown3rposted 7 years ago

    I have one pit bull and he is the sweetest thing ever! He will be four months at the end of May. He is dark brindle. I love having him around. I walk into my house and he just attacks me with KISSES! Honestly... I don't know why anyone can say anything bad about these dogs. They are beautiful and deserve respect. My pit LOVES the neighborhood kids and my cats. He has taken in my kitten as if it is his hahah. They sleep together and everything! There isn't a mean bone in this dog! I hate to see them get such a bad name because of ignorant people and media. If more people would just take the time to get to understand these dogs they would see how wonderful they truly are! My husband and I are looking for another one to keep company while we are not at home.

    1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
      Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Bowser is the best dog we've ever had, i love taking him to places. we take him to see my mother at the nursing home, and to the dog park. Usualy he start conversations, gives me a chance to show ppl how sweat these dogs can be.

    2. candice5 profile image61
      candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I know someone that felt just like you, unfortunately she now has a disfigured grandchild. It had already chased cats, I know other breeds can be bad as well But these are ridiculous.inbred things.

      1. lrohner profile image84
        lrohnerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I think the point here is that maybe some people would take the chance of having a pit and risk your insurance rates going sky high or your kids' physical health, but I sure wouldn't. You may get bitten by a chihuahua, but you certainly won't be disfigured by it!

        1. candice5 profile image61
          candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Too true I prefer your kind, I think they are ugly poor inbred things. That being said the sick pitt bull that was in the Paper, was beautiful, had a lovely face.

          1. lrohner profile image84
            lrohnerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            LOL! I have to admit that one of my chi's (a rescue) is probably the ugliest dog on earth!

  32. profile image59
    Monica_Stevenposted 7 years ago

    Wow..Everyone here throwing interesting comments.
    I guess you says it all how good are Golden Retriever are.

  33. World Marketing profile image60
    World Marketingposted 7 years ago

    Been Around PITBulls All My Life,They Are The Most Loyal Dogs.
    The Bad Rep Pitts Get is Because You Got Street Thugs Portraying,pitts in a Savage Way. If You See Where These Pitt Bites Happen is Always In Ghetto,Hood Ass Towns.Which They TREAT
    There Dogs The Same Way They Treat Their Own KIDS with PHYSICAL Abuse.

    1. candice5 profile image61
      candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I agree with the last sentence. I also feel that it would be more appropriate to not let these types breed, but for some reason, they feel the need to have an neglect these dogs over here. We don't have ghettos as such its not a particularly poor Country, these are just low life people.Often inbred themselves, so maybe they can identify. I do hear you though, Just different over here.

  34. Whitney05 profile image63
    Whitney05posted 7 years ago

    Eternal Evolution this conversation has turned pretty funny.

    To me it sounds like one or to mix breeds have ruined the breed and all imports are pure bred? Did I gather that right?


    That because one person breeds a whole other breed, all other breeds are based on her evidence with that one breed? 

    I'm confused...

    I'd like to know if my dog is pure bred according to Candice.

    Just because a dog has papers, it doesn't mean it's pure bred. Hybrids can be QUITE pricey and they can have papers, but that doesn't mean they are pure bred dogs. It means there are loopholes in all registries to get papers.

    I've seen dogs that started in shelters without papers, end up with papers once they've been through the shelters a few times.

    Not all dogs are bad and not all dogs of one breed are bad.

    I can say the same thing for German Shepherd, they've seen their bad days just the APBT's are seeing now.

    Did you know that when German Shepherds and other breeds were highly feared, the APBT was the most sought after family pet? If history doesn't change and background doesn't change, shouldn't you be just as feared of your German Shepherds as APBT's which have no human aggression backgrounds?

    1. candice5 profile image61
      candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      smile Not sure on your one. My Shepherds are Guard Dogs, they will act on command, they knock a person down, and stand over them, until the owner (They do not bite) appears. Sure they have had bad press and one in Italiy ate its owner, and another ate a Baby, both were neglected, and starving, apart from those two cases, most of the aggravated attacks, are by bitza's or Pit Bull Terriers and PTB X's I will say I trust the Shepherds way before I trust my friends purebred Pitbulls.  She is registered and a very good breeder, she checks the Homes out that they go to as she is aware of the cross breeding that can be allowed, and that does happen.

      1. Whitney05 profile image63
        Whitney05posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Looks like from Eternals pup and mine, neither you nor your friend can determine Pit Bulls.

        Bowser looks full, but as proven not, and Mia is full blooded with a good pedigree behind her.

        I'd suggest you check out my hub about dog attacks and pit bulls: http://hubpages.com/hub/Dog-Attacks-and-Aggression

        Most Pit Bull attacks are not accurate. You will find media portrays the dog as worse than it is, and that in most cases media uses Pit Bull attack instead of the true breed. Many articles labeled as a pit bull but within the article, using the other breed that really caused the attack. They never tell you the true and complete story, either. You can't trust media.

        If you can't ID a dog breed, don't say anything bad about it, and you can't seem to ID the dogs.



        Eternal, I agree back to the topic at hand..
        I'll start over, as I think I've already mentioned about my dog and the breed... I love this breed because no matter how much people think they're bad and how much they want to be scared of them, it only takes one to change their minds.

        I realized yesterday when at the gas station with my dad, how much he has changed with the breed. It started with never having one of those dogs in my house. To sitting and watching a huge blue un-neutered male with cropped ears walk next to his owner off leash and no collar. Stop and drink from his owners hand. We sat and watch for over 5 minutes, and drove away with my dad saying, that was a good looking dog.

        Before MIA, he would have passed the dog off and said it looked mean, and that would have been it.

        1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
          Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Bowser has changed my life, I have always said that there are no bad dogs only bad owners. Slade (my boston who is now passed)was attacketd by a pit bull, but even that didn't stop me from liking the breed or prevent me from getting a pit. i placed the blame where it belonged, on the owner. Because of Bowser I started speaking out against BSL and the stero-types placed on pit bulls. He is such a great dog, even though he's not an APBT he has all the qualities of one. He loves everyone he meats. He curently shares a house with two cats and two boston terriers. He is a spoiled baby lol.

          1. candice5 profile image61
            candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

            They don't actually scare me, no dog has managed that, far as I am concerned I stand by exactly what I said, and I never said yours wasn't pit, just tongue in cheek don't know about yours, looks way to wimpy Whitneys dog) to be a Pit so I guess not all tarred with same brush. I looked the hub over, but it didn't really hold any surprises but thanks for the info.

            1. candice5 profile image61
              candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this
            2. Whitney05 profile image63
              Whitney05posted 7 years ago in reply to this

              Yep she is, and is actually a good show of her bloodline. Don't try to guess if you don't know. There are different bloodlines of the breed, all with a different appearance. They're not all the same appearance. Stick with what you know before you try to tell someone else something who knows more than you about the topic.

              By the way that dog has suffered bone cancer, amputation, 6 rounds of chemo drips, daily chemo pills, all at the age of 18 months, completing the drips before she was 2years. So don't call her whimpy. It's offensive.

              1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
                Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                How is MIA doing?

                1. Whitney05 profile image63
                  Whitney05posted 7 years ago in reply to this

                  Thanks for asking. She's doing ok. Her last checkup came out fine, but she has to get an xray and bloodwork monthly to see if its metastisized in her lungs.

                  Today she's actually not feeling well, and is just lounging around.

                  1. Eternal Evolution profile image85
                    Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                    Good to hear her tests are comming back fine, i hope they continue to. She's such a beautiful dog, and from the way you talk about her she sounds like she's got a wonderful personality. She's lucky to have a own who cares for her the way you do.

              2. candice5 profile image61
                candice5posted 7 years ago in reply to this

                If you understood even one thing I have been saying, without just not listening, Me saying the Dog looks wimpy is flattering, as I do not love the breed. I feel for any animal that suffers O.K. smile

    2. Eternal Evolution profile image85
      Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I've just sat here thinking about how this forum has when way off it's original subject. this is what i first posted and what ths forum is suposed to be about...

      Tell us a little about your Pit, why you love them/this breed so much.

      This was suposed to be a forum for people like us who own pit bulls to talk about why we love them/the breed so much. but it's turned into yet another discusion about pit bulls being good or bad.

    3. Eternal Evolution profile image85
      Eternal Evolutionposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I've just sat here thinking about how this forum has when way off it's original subject. this is what i first posted and what ths forum is suposed to be about...

      Tell us a little about your Pit, why you love them/this breed so much.

      This was suposed to be a forum for people like us who own pit bulls to talk about why we love them/the breed so much. but it's turned into yet another discusion about pit bulls being good or bad.

 
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