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Agressive Chihuahua and New baby

  1. Alexisjackson profile image60
    Alexisjacksonposted 5 years ago

    How would I go about helping his behavior without spending lots of money. I'm terrified for him to go near my baby but my husband loves this dog. I don't want to give up on him but my husband isn't trying to teach him or fix his behavior and I'm getting to the point to where I want to get rid of him.

    How can I help him? (We've already had him fixed thinking it would help)

    1. ptosis profile image77
      ptosisposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It depends on how old the dog is.  leerburg.com/pdf/preventingdogbitesinchildren.pdf

      http://leerburg.com/dogs-babies.htm?set=1

      "Are the circumstances that prompt your dog to behave aggressively easy or impossible to avoid?" - http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/guide/aggression-dogs?page=7

      "As soon as babies are crawling they need to be told to be kind to the family dog. Puppies are never too young to learn, neither are babies. If you have just acquired a new puppy do not let it chew you or play nip." - http://strongdogz.com/blogs/babies-children-dogs/

      "If you keep them inside then take all precautions. Don't leave them alone together for even a second."

      "Not only is aggression toward children exceedingly difficult to treat because of safety concerns, the likelihood that a dog with this problem will ever become trustworthy is slim. " -http://www.aspcabehavior.org/articles/49/Aggression-in-Dogs.aspx



      I gave my newly adopted dog for the same reason because it was too old to retrain. ('Adopting a Problem Dog Diary') According to "Adoptable Dog, Teaching Your Adopted Pet to Obey, Trust and Love You' by John Ross and Barbara McKinney on page 105, "There are times when I recommend that owners give up their aggressive dog that has serious biting problems .... when the owners' safety or the welfare of their children are in question, there may be no other rational choice."

      1. Alexisjackson profile image60
        Alexisjacksonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Thank you

  2. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    Regardless of what you do in the meantime, just be sure to keep them apart.

  3. tobey100 profile image59
    tobey100posted 5 years ago

    Get rid of the dog.  Problem solved.  We are talking about a baby here aren't we?  No contest.  The dog loses hands down.  I have five sons and love dogs but let the dog even act like he's gonna harm one of my children and he's history.

  4. Alexisjackson profile image60
    Alexisjacksonposted 5 years ago

    Yeah no he's never around the baby, it's just my boyfriend is putting up a fight, but yesterday I talked to him and we have found a new home with someone who has the patience for him.

  5. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    I think dumping a dog without and trying to train it properly is hardly responsible, especially a small dog you can keep separated from the child.  And also especially because most of how a dog behaves is set up by the owners.  So they make it aggressive, then they punish it for doing just what they taught it.

    Basically, the dog needs to be taught non-negotiable rules.  You are going to need help from a trainer or behavioral veterinarian. I adopted an aggressive dog, he is no longer aggressive and kids can crawl all around him, in most cases it can be done.

    But there is no one method.  Some one who understands behavior needs to look at why and when this dig is aggressive in order to tell you what will work with this dog.  The only starting point I can suggest is that every time this dog snarls or acts aggressive, put it in time out (e.g. the back yard) for at least 5 minutes. That is a good basic place to start.

    1. ptosis profile image77
      ptosisposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Not everyone can do that.

      According to 'Adoptable Dog, Teaching Your Adopted Pet to Obey, Trust and Love You' by John Ross and Barbara McKinney on page 105, "There are times when I recommend that owners give up their aggressive dog that has serious biting problems .... when the owners' safety or the welfare of their children are in question, there may be no other rational choice." - Adopting a Problem Dog Diary

      http://www.blogcdn.com/www.parentdish.co.uk/media/2011/06/dog-attack-bns_284x189.jpghttp://www.blogcdn.com/www.parentdish.co.uk/media/2010/09/dog-bite-1-crop_284x189.jpg

      1. Alexisjackson profile image60
        Alexisjacksonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        wow yeah that's why we made our decision to give him a new home, that is just horrible.

  6. Alexisjackson profile image60
    Alexisjacksonposted 5 years ago

    Yes but right now we don't have the money for a trainer or behavioral veterinarian, but we found a really great home for him with someone who has the time and money.

 
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