irukandji jellyfish

Irukandji Jellyfish

Irukandji Jellyfish
Irukandji Jellyfish

Irukandji Jellyfish

The Irukandji Jellyfish (Carukia barnesi) inhabits the tropical hot waters of Australia.
The Irukandji is a deadly jellyfish, its 2.5 centimeters (with bell and tentacles) in diameter,
which obviously makes it difficult to spot while you are in the water..

Irukandji is supposed to be the one of the most venomous creatures worldwide.

The name Irukandji refers to Aboriginal Australian tribe that lived in the the Palm Cove area of northern Queensland where Irukandji syndrome, (what happens after getting stung) by the irukandji poisons are most frequent.

More and more is being learnt about this pecies of jellyfish in recent years, due to a number of high profile deaths of swimmers in Australia. 

This irukandji jellyfish is close cousin to the the also deadly jellyfish, Meduse Della box.

The jellyfish itself was identified in 1964 by Dr. Jack Barnes.

Irukandji has stingers on its tentacles and its bell end.

Ben Southall - Best Job in the World

Trouble in paradise for the British man Ben Southall who had the "Best Job in the World" as the caretaker of a tropical Australian island when he was stung by the jellyfish.

The Irukandji jellyfish sting was not even noticed until he went to the hospital,
complaining of chest and feet pains.

Ways to stop the sting before reaching hospital

You must use an acidic solution (not urine) Vinegar is the best and will  work. Acidity inactivates the jellyfish toxins that are in any tentacles stuck on your skin.  You can also wash the area with salt water or rub sand on it.

Do not use fresh water on it, as this reactivates the stingers.


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Michael Shane profile image

Michael Shane 6 years ago from Gadsden, Alabama

Yikes!

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