Crochet Lacy Cardigan Free Recipe Pattern

TABLE OF CONTENTS

About the Pattern

About My Cardigan

Required Skill

Measurement

Materials


Project Instructions

A. Crocheting Lace Rectangles

B. Assembly

1. Shoulder Seam

2. Side Seam

3. Armhole Seam

C. Finishing

1. Sleeve

2. Back Bodice

- Front-Loop Sc Video

3. Front Bodice

- Sc Decrease Video

- Reverse Sc Video

Are you longing to crochet yourself something wearable but you’re too scared to try? I was. And this is my first cardigan project, the first HUGE crochet project I undertook, and I succeeded. And so will you.

Do you want to crochet something you can wear every day without looking too different? I do, every day. And this cardigan is conventional enough to be a wardrobe staple yet unique enough to provide a sense of individuality. It evokes an old-world feel but it has sufficient class to stand as a timeless piece. Another dream-come-true for me!

About the Pattern

This pattern focuses on how to assemble and finish a cardigan using any lace pattern.

This is a recipe pattern, meaning, this is a formula that shows you how you can have your own lacy cardigan. The construction is based on your own choice of crochet lace rectangles and relies on the elasticity of crochet lace to create shape. This recipe requires some estimation because you are making a cardigan just for Y-O-U. But you don’t have to be afraid because this recipe allows a lot of room for errors.

Because I am a visual person, this pattern is most suited to a visual learner. It includes many diagrams, illustrations, and pictures in transferring meaning.

Important Note: The diagrams are NOT DRAWN TO SCALE. The actual cardigan may contain more or less depending on the size you are making.

My Crochet Bible

Crochet Stitches VISUAL Encyclopedia
Crochet Stitches VISUAL Encyclopedia

Out of the many crochet books I have on my Kindle PC, this is the most helpful and inspiring. It contains lots of stitch and motif patterns appropriate for just about anything I want to crochet. Indeed, it has become my crochet bible.

 

About My Cardigan

The primary purpose of my cardigan is to protect my arms from the glaring tropical sun. This purpose is my guiding light in choosing the crochet lace patterns I used for this cardigan. Identify the primary purpose of your cardigan and let that reason help you decide what lace pattern/s to use for your own cardigan.

The lace patterns I used for my cardigan are from the book Crochet Stitches VISUAL Encyclopedia by Robyn Chachula. The front bodice uses the Pistachio Shell, the sleeves show the Iris Shell, and the back bodice features Leaf Bloom. I used a very open lacework for the back bodice so it won’t add too much heat since I live in a very hot climate.

Do you want to crochet your own cardigan?

  • YES! Thanks for showing how!
  • Yes, but I don't have the time (I'm just really scared I'd fail).
  • I wish! But I don't know how to crochet.
See results without voting

Required Skill:

  • Crocheting lace rectangles in rows and rounds (choose your own favorite lace patterns)
  • Ch, sc, sl st, front-loop sc (see video below), sc decrease(see video below)
  • Taking body measurements
  • Pinning pieces together
  • Attaching new thread

Measurement:

A. Shoulder Width
B. Shoulder-to-Hip Length
C. Shoulder-to-First-Rib Length (The first rib is found on the side, about 4-5 inches below the armpit. It’s where your rib starts to branch out.)
D. Sleeve Length
E. Armhole

Materials

  • Size 8 mercerized crochet cotton or raylon (crochet cotton is best because it’s easier to handle)
  • 3/0 aluminum hook
  • Dressmaker’s pins
  • Stitch markers (optional but very helpful when working the sleeve and the shirred part of the cardigan)

PROJECT INSTRUCTIONS:

A. Crocheting the Lace Rectangles

Choose lace pattern/s for the front bodice, back bodice, and sleeve. One lace pattern will do or different lace patterns can be used.

Tip: When using different lace patterns, choose patterns that have the same density. One setback that my cardigan has is my use of a very open lacework (Leaf Bloom lace) for my back bodice. The bodice gets stretched out by the heavier sleeve lace (Iris Shell lace). I should have used the same lace for the back and front bodice (Pistachio Shell lace).

For the sleeve, choose a lace pattern that can be worked in the round. Use a stitch marker to mark the end of a round. I had to frog several rounds when I discovered that I missed the turn of the previous round. This happens a lot to me when I’m watching TV or talking to someone while crocheting.

Back Bodice – The width of the back bodice is equivalent to the shoulder width. Its length is equal to the shoulder-to-first-rib length.

Front Bodice 1 and 2 – The width of each front bodice is 1/3 of the shoulder width while its length is equal to the shoulder-to-hip length.

Sleeves – The length is equivalent to the sleeve length while the circumference is equal to the armhole circumference.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Length and width of back bodice - it's just a rectangleLeaf Bloom - my crochet lace for the back bodiceLength and width of front bodice - it's just a rectanglePistachio Shell - my crochet lace for the front bodiceCircumference and length of sleeveIris Shell - my crochet lace for the sleeve
Length and width of back bodice - it's just a rectangle
Length and width of back bodice - it's just a rectangle
Leaf Bloom - my crochet lace for the back bodice
Leaf Bloom - my crochet lace for the back bodice
Length and width of front bodice - it's just a rectangle
Length and width of front bodice - it's just a rectangle
Pistachio Shell - my crochet lace for the front bodice
Pistachio Shell - my crochet lace for the front bodice
Circumference and length of sleeve
Circumference and length of sleeve
Iris Shell - my crochet lace for the sleeve
Iris Shell - my crochet lace for the sleeve

B. Assembly

1. Shoulder Seam

The shoulders are attached first. Make sure you attach the front bodices to the same number of stitches on the back bodice.

Pin at about 1-inch intervals.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The blue circles represent the stitches that serve as the seam. The brown circles and lines represent the dressmaker’s pins. Note the correct orientation of the front and back bodice through the bold yellow arrows. This diagram is NOT DRAWN TO SCALE.Legend to the diagramI'm pretty bad at estimating, my pins are not exactly 1-inch apart. But the seam worked just fine.
The blue circles represent the stitches that serve as the seam. The brown circles and lines represent the dressmaker’s pins. Note the correct orientation of the front and back bodice through the bold yellow arrows. This diagram is NOT DRAWN TO SCALE.
The blue circles represent the stitches that serve as the seam. The brown circles and lines represent the dressmaker’s pins. Note the correct orientation of the front and back bodice through the bold yellow arrows. This diagram is NOT DRAWN TO SCALE.
Legend to the diagram
Legend to the diagram
I'm pretty bad at estimating, my pins are not exactly 1-inch apart. But the seam worked just fine.
I'm pretty bad at estimating, my pins are not exactly 1-inch apart. But the seam worked just fine.
//Crochet Pattern Begins

Attach new thread through both front and back bodices.

[Ch 2, sl st to the front bodice, ch 2, sl st to the back bodice, ch 2, sl st to the front bodice on the next dressmaker’s pin. Ch 2, sl st to the back bodice, ch 2, sl st to the front bodice, ch 2, sl st to the back bodice on the next dressmaker’s pin.]

Repeat instructions in [ ] until the end of the shoulder seam is reached. The last sl st should go through both front and back bodice.

Cut thread and weave in loose ends. Attach the other front bodice in the same way.

//Crochet Pattern Ends

Click thumbnail to view full-size
How to attach the side seamClose-up on the diagram - indicates where to start the side seamClose-up on the diagram - shows where to place the pinsClose-up on the diagram - details the crochet stitches involved in the seamPinning the bodices for the side seamThe side seam highlighted in yellow - it's almost invisible
How to attach the side seam
How to attach the side seam
Close-up on the diagram - indicates where to start the side seam
Close-up on the diagram - indicates where to start the side seam
Close-up on the diagram - shows where to place the pins
Close-up on the diagram - shows where to place the pins
Close-up on the diagram - details the crochet stitches involved in the seam
Close-up on the diagram - details the crochet stitches involved in the seam
Pinning the bodices for the side seam
Pinning the bodices for the side seam
The side seam highlighted in yellow - it's almost invisible
The side seam highlighted in yellow - it's almost invisible

2. Side Seam

The side seam is joined in the same way as the shoulder seam.

The front and back bodices are pinned at 1-inch intervals. The new thread is attached via a sl st that goes through both back and front bodices.

Your cardigan should look like a vest now. It’s a good idea to try on your cardigan to make sure the armhole is just right. Don’t forget that crochet lace stretches.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
How to attach the sleeve to the bodiceClose up on the diagram - the midpoint is pinned to the shoulder seam while the starting point is pinned to the side seam.Close up on the diagram - the same crochet stitches are used to connect the sleeves to the bodice
How to attach the sleeve to the bodice
How to attach the sleeve to the bodice
Close up on the diagram - the midpoint is pinned to the shoulder seam while the starting point is pinned to the side seam.
Close up on the diagram - the midpoint is pinned to the shoulder seam while the starting point is pinned to the side seam.
Close up on the diagram - the same crochet stitches are used to connect the sleeves to the bodice
Close up on the diagram - the same crochet stitches are used to connect the sleeves to the bodice

3. Armhole Seam

The last seam we attach is the armhole seam. The sleeve is connected to the bodice.

First, identify the midpoint of the sleeve lace and pin this to the shoulder seam. The starting point of the sleeve lace is pinned to the side seam.

Pin the rest of the sleeve to the bodice at 1-inch intervals. Join to the bodice using the same ch-2 and sl-st stitches.

Don’t forget to try on your cardigan. Make the necessary adjustments because there is no turning back after the seams.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The first round should be of the same circumference as the sleeve. Use a stitch marker to mark the beginning of each round. This diagram is NOT DRAWN TO SCALE.Repeat the third (red) round 10 times. The thin yellow arrow indicates the direction of each round. The sleeve finishing is worked in one direction only. This diagram is NOT DRAWN TO SCALE.Close up on my cardigan's sleeve's finishSleeve's edge on my model
The first round should be of the same circumference as the sleeve. Use a stitch marker to mark the beginning of each round. This diagram is NOT DRAWN TO SCALE.
The first round should be of the same circumference as the sleeve. Use a stitch marker to mark the beginning of each round. This diagram is NOT DRAWN TO SCALE.
Repeat the third (red) round 10 times. The thin yellow arrow indicates the direction of each round. The sleeve finishing is worked in one direction only. This diagram is NOT DRAWN TO SCALE.
Repeat the third (red) round 10 times. The thin yellow arrow indicates the direction of each round. The sleeve finishing is worked in one direction only. This diagram is NOT DRAWN TO SCALE.
Close up on my cardigan's sleeve's finish
Close up on my cardigan's sleeve's finish
Sleeve's edge on my model
Sleeve's edge on my model

C. Finishing

1. Sleeve

The finishing rounds of the sleeve can be done right after the sleeve lace is crocheted before it is attached to the bodice.

About 12 rounds of chain mesh are used to finish the sleeves. The first round is of the same width as the sleeve. The second round begins to taper and in the last ten rounds the width of the sleeve is reduced so that only the wrist gets through.

//Crochet Pattern Begins

Round 1:

[Ch 3, sl st to the sleeve.] The instructions in [ ] represents one mesh.

Repeat the instructions in [ ] around the circumference of the sleeve. On the last mesh of the round, ch 1, hdc on the sleeve.

Round 2:

[(Ch 3, sl st to the next ch-3 space) 3x, ch 3, skip the one ch-3 space, sl st to the next ch-3 space.] Repeat the instructions in [ ] around. On the last mesh of the round, ch 1, hdc on the next ch-3 space.

Round 3 – 12:

[Ch 2, sl st to the next ch space.] Repeat the instructions in [ ] around. On the last mesh of the round, ch 1, sc on the next ch space.

Break off and weave in loose ends.

//Crochet Pattern Ends

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Diagram for back bodice's finishClose up on the diagram. Notice where the beginning of the back bodice's finish. The thin yellow arrows shows the direction of crochet stitches.Close up on the diagramLegendBeginning of my back bodice finishing - notice how the front bodice is greatly shirred. The shirring on the back bodice is not so visible because it's a very open lacework.Back Bodice Finished!
Diagram for back bodice's finish
Diagram for back bodice's finish
Close up on the diagram. Notice where the beginning of the back bodice's finish. The thin yellow arrows shows the direction of crochet stitches.
Close up on the diagram. Notice where the beginning of the back bodice's finish. The thin yellow arrows shows the direction of crochet stitches.
Close up on the diagram
Close up on the diagram
Legend
Legend
Beginning of my back bodice finishing - notice how the front bodice is greatly shirred. The shirring on the back bodice is not so visible because it's a very open lacework.
Beginning of my back bodice finishing - notice how the front bodice is greatly shirred. The shirring on the back bodice is not so visible because it's a very open lacework.
Back Bodice Finished!
Back Bodice Finished!

How to Front-Loop Sc

2. Back Bodice

The back bodice is finished with a band of front-loop sc’s. The remaining length of the front bodice is shirred as well as the edges of the back bodice.

You can use stitch markers to divide the remaining length of the front bodice evenly so that the shirring will be uniform. The same can be done to the shirred part of the back bodice.

//Crochet Pattern Begins

Attach new thread at the edge of the front bodice.

Row 1: Ch 1, 15 sc on the front bodice (as previously marked). This will create the shirring of the front bodice. Sl st to the back bodice.

Row 2: Sl st to the back bodice (as previously marked for the shirring of the back bodice), TURN, 15 front-loop sc, ch 1, TURN.

Row 3: 15 front-loop sc, sl st to the back bodice (as previously marked for the shirring of the back bodice).

Row 4: Sl st to the back bodice (on the last mark for the shirring of the back bodice on this side), TURN, 15 front-loop sc, ch 1, TURN

Row 5: 15 front-loop sc, sl st to the back bodice.

Row 6: Sl st to the back bodice, TURN, 15 front-loop sc, ch 1, TURN.

Repeat Row 5-6 until the last 5th row just before the shirring of the back bodice.

Repeat Rows 2-3 for the remaining four rows.

Sl st the last row the other front bodice as previously marked for the shirring of that front bodice.

Break off and weave in ends.

//Crochet Pattern Ends

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Diagram for the front bodice's finishing rows and roundClose up on the diagramClose up on the diagram - beginning of finishingClose up on the diagram - front bodice corner edgeClose up on the diagram - collar cornerClose up on the diagramLegendMy cardigan showing the corner where the back bodice's finish ends and the front bodice's finish beginsMy cardigan's front bodice corner edgeMy cardigan's collar corner
Diagram for the front bodice's finishing rows and round
Diagram for the front bodice's finishing rows and round
Close up on the diagram
Close up on the diagram
Close up on the diagram - beginning of finishing
Close up on the diagram - beginning of finishing
Close up on the diagram - front bodice corner edge
Close up on the diagram - front bodice corner edge
Close up on the diagram - collar corner
Close up on the diagram - collar corner
Close up on the diagram
Close up on the diagram
Legend
Legend
My cardigan showing the corner where the back bodice's finish ends and the front bodice's finish begins
My cardigan showing the corner where the back bodice's finish ends and the front bodice's finish begins
My cardigan's front bodice corner edge
My cardigan's front bodice corner edge
My cardigan's collar corner
My cardigan's collar corner

How to Reverse Sc

3. Front Bodice

The last part to finish is the front bodice. The last round of reverse sc’s (drawn in red on the diagrams) is optional. Even without the reverse sc round, the cardigan is already finished.

//Crochet Pattern Begins

Attach new thread at the corner of front bodice 1 and the back bodice finishing. Ch 1.

Row 1: [Sc on the front bodice, ch 3] Repeat [ ] until the corner of front bodice 2 and back bodice finishing is reached. Care must be taken that the sc’s fall at the corners of the front bodice and collar. Ch 1, TURN.

Row 2: Sc on ch-3 space, ch 2, [sc on sc, ch 3]. Repeat [ ] until the front bodice corner edge is reached. Sc on ch-3 space, ch 3, sc on the next ch-3, ch 3, sc on the next sc. Repeat [ ] until the 1stcollar corner is reached. (Ch 2, sc on sc) 2x. Repeat [ ] across except for the corners. Deal with them as described. On the last ch space, sc on sc, ch 2, sc decrease. Ch 1, TURN.

Row 3: Sc on sc, ch 1, [sc on sc, ch 3]. Repeat [ ] until the collar corner is reached. (Ch 1, sc on sc) 2x. Repeat [ ] across except for the next collar corner. On the last ch sp, sc on sc, ch 1, sc decrease. Ch 1, TURN.

Row 4: Sc on sc, [sc on sc, ch 3]. Repeat [ ] until the collar corner is reached. (Sc on sc) 2x. Repeat [ ] across except for the next collar corner. On the last ch sp, sc on sc, sc decrease. Ch 1.

This is the END of the required finish. Break off and weave in ends.

OPTIONAL ROUND: Turn, rsc on sc, [rsc on sc, 3 rsc on ch-3 space]. Repeat [ ] until the edge of Row 4 is reached. Rsc on the edge of each row, sl st across the back bodice finishing, rsc on the edge of each row, sl st to the first rsc of the round.

Break off and weave in ends.

//Crochet Pattern Ends

© 2014 Moira Durano-Abesmo

More by this Author


I LOVE Comments! 2 comments

MoiraCrochets profile image

MoiraCrochets 2 years ago from Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines Author

Thank you heidithorne!


heidithorne profile image

heidithorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

What a cute project! Wish I had more time to make one. Voted up and beautiful!

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working