Crochet CRESCENT Clutch Free Pattern

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CRESCENT Clutch photographed empty. The creases are evident on this photo.CRESCENT Clutch photographed with some balls inside.CRESCENT Clutch photographed empty against white background. The creases are evident on this photo.CRESCENT Clutch photographed with a lot of stuff inside.CRESCENT Clutch photographed from another angle with a lot of stuff inside.
CRESCENT Clutch photographed empty. The creases are evident on this photo.
CRESCENT Clutch photographed empty. The creases are evident on this photo.
CRESCENT Clutch photographed with some balls inside.
CRESCENT Clutch photographed with some balls inside.
CRESCENT Clutch photographed empty against white background. The creases are evident on this photo.
CRESCENT Clutch photographed empty against white background. The creases are evident on this photo.
CRESCENT Clutch photographed with a lot of stuff inside.
CRESCENT Clutch photographed with a lot of stuff inside.
CRESCENT Clutch photographed from another angle with a lot of stuff inside.
CRESCENT Clutch photographed from another angle with a lot of stuff inside.

When I finished crocheting this clutch, I had some apprehensions whether I can actually make use of it. It didn’t quite turn out as I had imagined it. There were so many stitches in the 8th to 11th rounds that the clutch creases on these parts. However, as time passed by, I realized that the creases brought more character to the clutch that I would not want to do it any other way anymore.

I’m not sure what got into me. Right after I made the BOXY Pouch, I had the sudden urge to make a semi-circle clutch using mostly bullion stitches. And I used plarn from 3 extra-extra large shopping bags for this clutch. Bullion stitch is already a challenge with traditional yarn, more so with plarn. But I guess adrenaline flowed in my blood during those times because I finished this in just two days.

Whenever I look at this clutch, I can’t believe I really made it. It’s my biggest FO so far. Check out all my patterns for evidence.

If you are interested to work with plastic bags like myself, I wrote an article about the methods of making plarn and conditioning plarn for knit/crochet.


My Free Pouch Patterns

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A beautiful pouch which uses the lovely crocodile stitchA lovely pouch which is crocheted using the Ripple stitch patternA simple pouch making use of the crab stitch (reverse single crochet) as emphasisA structural pouch that uses broomstick lace to create interest and ridges in the patternA beautiful pouch which uses the Bushy stitch pattern adorned with Dr. Jeckyll's Flower
A beautiful pouch which uses the lovely crocodile stitch
A beautiful pouch which uses the lovely crocodile stitch | Source
A lovely pouch which is crocheted using the Ripple stitch pattern
A lovely pouch which is crocheted using the Ripple stitch pattern | Source
A simple pouch making use of the crab stitch (reverse single crochet) as emphasis
A simple pouch making use of the crab stitch (reverse single crochet) as emphasis | Source
Source
A structural pouch that uses broomstick lace to create interest and ridges in the pattern
A structural pouch that uses broomstick lace to create interest and ridges in the pattern | Source
A beautiful pouch which uses the Bushy stitch pattern adorned with Dr. Jeckyll's Flower
A beautiful pouch which uses the Bushy stitch pattern adorned with Dr. Jeckyll's Flower | Source
Source
Source

Skill Level

The use of bullion stitches makes this pattern a bit difficult.
The use of bullion stitches makes this pattern a bit difficult.

Abbreviations

  • Ch - Chain
  • Sl st - Slip stitch
  • St/sts - Stitch/Stitches
  • Sc - Single Crochet


Measurements and Gauge

Width: 12 in

Length: 6 in

Gauge: 5 sts/inch, 7 sts/inch on the creases


Materials and Tools

Materials

  • Yarn
  • 12-in Zipper
  • Cloth

Tools

  • Hook suitable to chosen yarn
  • Sewing pins and needle
  • Sewing thread
  • Tapestry needle
  • Plastic tubing (optional)

I used 1-cn single-strand plarn from about 3 XXL shopping bags, #3 crochet hook, 12 –in ordinary zipper because there’s no YKK zipper available, and cloth from an old t-shirt.


How I Make My Bullion Stitches

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Figure 1:To demonstrate how to make a bullion stitch, I made this small bullion circle. Green photographs really well for me, so I chose this color instead of the color I used for the clutch.Figure 2:To begin, wrap yarn around hook 8 times and pull it to the widest part of hook called the SHANK. This will make sure that the coils have uniform width and for the coil to take shape.Figure 3: Insert hook in ring (or wherever the pattern say), draw up a loop and pull the loops again towards the SHANK. All this time, put your middle finger on loops on hook to keep them from sliding and losing shape.Figure 4: Yarn over and draw up a loop through all loops on hook. Use your thumb and middle finger to hold the loops as you gently pull up a loop through the coils.Figure 5: Secure the coil with a chain stitch. Notice that the chain must be as tall as the bullion stitch so that it will stand straight. Now this represents one bullion stitch.Figure 6: This is what I mean when this pattern calls for a stitch to be worked on top of a bullion stitch.Figure 7: This is what I mean when this pattern calls for a stitch to be worked in between bullion stitches.
Figure 1:To demonstrate how to make a bullion stitch, I made this small bullion circle. Green photographs really well for me, so I chose this color instead of the color I used for the clutch.
Figure 1:To demonstrate how to make a bullion stitch, I made this small bullion circle. Green photographs really well for me, so I chose this color instead of the color I used for the clutch.
Figure 2:To begin, wrap yarn around hook 8 times and pull it to the widest part of hook called the SHANK. This will make sure that the coils have uniform width and for the coil to take shape.
Figure 2:To begin, wrap yarn around hook 8 times and pull it to the widest part of hook called the SHANK. This will make sure that the coils have uniform width and for the coil to take shape.
Figure 3: Insert hook in ring (or wherever the pattern say), draw up a loop and pull the loops again towards the SHANK. All this time, put your middle finger on loops on hook to keep them from sliding and losing shape.
Figure 3: Insert hook in ring (or wherever the pattern say), draw up a loop and pull the loops again towards the SHANK. All this time, put your middle finger on loops on hook to keep them from sliding and losing shape.
Figure 4: Yarn over and draw up a loop through all loops on hook. Use your thumb and middle finger to hold the loops as you gently pull up a loop through the coils.
Figure 4: Yarn over and draw up a loop through all loops on hook. Use your thumb and middle finger to hold the loops as you gently pull up a loop through the coils.
Figure 5: Secure the coil with a chain stitch. Notice that the chain must be as tall as the bullion stitch so that it will stand straight. Now this represents one bullion stitch.
Figure 5: Secure the coil with a chain stitch. Notice that the chain must be as tall as the bullion stitch so that it will stand straight. Now this represents one bullion stitch.
Figure 6: This is what I mean when this pattern calls for a stitch to be worked on top of a bullion stitch.
Figure 6: This is what I mean when this pattern calls for a stitch to be worked on top of a bullion stitch.
Figure 7: This is what I mean when this pattern calls for a stitch to be worked in between bullion stitches.
Figure 7: This is what I mean when this pattern calls for a stitch to be worked in between bullion stitches.

Crocheting Bullion Stitch with Help

What is the Bullion Stitch

The bullion stitch or roll stitch is an advanced crochet stitch which consists of coils of wraps around the hook through which the yarn is drawn.This coil is then capped off with a chain that secures the coils.

It is quite difficult to make, especially if you think that it is. I learned this stitch by practicing it with just 3 wraps. Once I got comfortable with it, I moved on to 4 wraps, then 5 wraps, 6 wraps, 7 and 8. Now I can do any number of wraps. Figures 1-7 explains the technique I've developed in making bullion stitches. It requires the use of middle fingers and thumbs.

The first video shows roughly how I do my bullion stitches. But if you're having difficulty, watch the next video. It shows two contraptions you can use to crochet the bullion stitch easier.

The bullion stitches used in this pattern use 8 wraps.


Crochet Instructions:

Ch 3, sl st to from ring. Ch 3, turn.

Round 1: 13 bullion st in ring, sl st to top of ch-3.

Round 2: (1 bullion st on top of previous bullion st, 1 bullion st in between bullion sts) repeat all around, sl st to top of ch-3. Ch 1, turn.

Round 3: (Sc on top of previous bullion st, sc in between bullion sts) repeat all around, sl st to 1st sc. Ch 3, turn.

Round 4: 1 bullion st on each sc, sl st to top of ch-3. Ch 1, turn.

Round 5-6: Sc all around, sl st to 1st sc. Ch 1, turn.

Round 7: Sc all around, sl st to 1st sc. Ch 3, turn.

Round 8-10: 1 bullion st all around, sl st to top of ch-3. Ch 3, turn.

Round 11: 1 bullion st all around, sl st to top of ch-3. Ch 1, turn.

Round 12: [(Sc on top of each bullion st) 13x, sc in between bullion sts] repeat all around, sl st to 1st sc. Ch 3, turn.

Round 13: 1 bullion st on each sc, sl st to top of ch-3. Ch 1, turn.

Round 14: [(Sc on top of each bullion st) 7x, sc in between bullion sts] repeat all around, sl st to 1st sc. Ch 3, turn.

Round 15: 1 bullion st on each sc, sl st to top of ch-3. Ch 1, turn.

Round 16: [(Sc on top of each bullion st) 8x, sc in between bullion sts] repeat all around, sl st to 1st sc. Ch 3, turn.

Round 17: 1 bullion st on each sc, sl st to top of ch-3. Ch 1, turn.

Round 18: [(Sc on top of each bullion st) 9x, sc in between bullion sts] repeat all around, sl st to 1st sc. Ch 3, turn.

Round 19: 1 bullion st on each sc, sl st to top of ch-3. Ch 1, turn.

Round 20-21: Sc on each sl, sl st to 1st sc. Ch 1, turn.

Break off. Fold the crocheted circle in half.

[Attach yarn to one end of the semi-circle. Join the sides with 10 sc’s, turn, 10 sl sts on the sc’s. Break off.] Repeat [ ] on the other side. Weave in ends.


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Attach the zipper to the crocheted clutch using back stitches on the 2nd to the last round.Trace the shape of the clutch onto a piece of cloth using a ball pen. The use of ball pen to make markings on cloth is not recommended but I like it because it makes an accurate line and won't smudge as I sew.Stitch the sides using back stitch. For the part near the zipper, use running stitches. Unravel a portion of the running stitches and pin the curved folds in place.Then stitch the curved folds in.Place the lining inside the clutch and turn it inside out.Pin the lining in place.Stitch the lining to the zipper. And you're done!
Attach the zipper to the crocheted clutch using back stitches on the 2nd to the last round.
Attach the zipper to the crocheted clutch using back stitches on the 2nd to the last round.
Trace the shape of the clutch onto a piece of cloth using a ball pen. The use of ball pen to make markings on cloth is not recommended but I like it because it makes an accurate line and won't smudge as I sew.
Trace the shape of the clutch onto a piece of cloth using a ball pen. The use of ball pen to make markings on cloth is not recommended but I like it because it makes an accurate line and won't smudge as I sew.
Stitch the sides using back stitch. For the part near the zipper, use running stitches. Unravel a portion of the running stitches and pin the curved folds in place.
Stitch the sides using back stitch. For the part near the zipper, use running stitches. Unravel a portion of the running stitches and pin the curved folds in place.
Then stitch the curved folds in.
Then stitch the curved folds in.
Place the lining inside the clutch and turn it inside out.
Place the lining inside the clutch and turn it inside out.
Pin the lining in place.
Pin the lining in place.
Stitch the lining to the zipper. And you're done!
Stitch the lining to the zipper. And you're done!

Finishing

In lining this clutch, I still the tutorial by Carrie Wolf. This is the most challenging to line because of its shape.


If you like my pattern please click the +1 button to help improve this pattern's Google Ranking. Better yet, click the "Like" or "Tweet" button. Thanks a lot for your help and appreciation.
If you like my pattern please click the +1 button to help improve this pattern's Google Ranking. Better yet, click the "Like" or "Tweet" button. Thanks a lot for your help and appreciation.

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Comments Make ME Happy! 3 comments

MoiraCrochets profile image

MoiraCrochets 5 years ago from Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines Author

Thanks Patrice! But it really is easy with the use of sewing pins. As for the lining, I found that cloth from t-shirts work best because they stretch, which means I can turn it inside out. It's easier to attach the lining this way.

Thank you, too, Manthy! I work really hard to publish only quality hubs to improve my Google ranking. :D


manthy profile image

manthy 5 years ago from Alabama,USA

Nice quality hub on a craft that you are an expert on - Voted up and awesome


PWalker281 5 years ago

Great pattern, Moira. You make putting a zipper in and lining a purse look so easy! Rated up and useful :-).

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