My Country As Seen In Vintage War Posters

The common citizen was used in many WW I and II war posters to sell war bonds to keep our country strong.
The common citizen was used in many WW I and II war posters to sell war bonds to keep our country strong.

A Look At World War I and II in vintage war posters.

Just like artifacts, these vintage war posters from World War I and II, depict the hard-working man and woman, the average American citizen, who's influence and support was vitally-important to keep our country unified, strong, and progressively-moving against the foes who would threaten our democracy, our freedoms and cherished way of life.

High-impact posters like this one got the point across that the U.S.A. would NOT tolerate anyone of anything who came against our country.
High-impact posters like this one got the point across that the U.S.A. would NOT tolerate anyone of anything who came against our country.
No one really likes death. Especially the death of our servicemen and women. Death was a sad statistic in World War I and II,l as it is today.
No one really likes death. Especially the death of our servicemen and women. Death was a sad statistic in World War I and II,l as it is today.
Another brave soul who has given his all for the U.S.A. can stand proud before His Maker and know that he is thought of as a hero.
Another brave soul who has given his all for the U.S.A. can stand proud before His Maker and know that he is thought of as a hero.
Unity among servicemen and Americans alike kept the war effort going in smooth pace and helped to keep our Armed Forces operating at maximum-speed.
Unity among servicemen and Americans alike kept the war effort going in smooth pace and helped to keep our Armed Forces operating at maximum-speed.

Who really likes war . . .?

No one. If hard-pressed for the truth. War means bloodshed, death, and loss of property as well as geographic locations many times. War, like death, is a cold fact of an imperfect life that we humans have made ourselves, and until the day comes when we can learn the fundamental principles of getting along with other nations, then there will always war.

"Loose lips, sink ships," was the most-famous non-gossip slogan of World War I and II. One word to the wrong person might mean the life of one serviceman .
"Loose lips, sink ships," was the most-famous non-gossip slogan of World War I and II. One word to the wrong person might mean the life of one serviceman .
The Fighting Sullivan Brothers made history in the United States Navy for being the most-dedicated brothers in one family to give their all for the war effort.
The Fighting Sullivan Brothers made history in the United States Navy for being the most-dedicated brothers in one family to give their all for the war effort.
The American Way of Life was one of the treasured items that was to be protected at all costs in World War I and II.
The American Way of Life was one of the treasured items that was to be protected at all costs in World War I and II.
Most war posters always showed a serviceman, smiling and proudly holding Old Glory in the air as a symbol of pride, honor, and victory.
Most war posters always showed a serviceman, smiling and proudly holding Old Glory in the air as a symbol of pride, honor, and victory.
A confident smile on the face of a brave serviceman, or in this case, a Navy man. Not many recruiting posters depicted soldiers with frowns, but smiles.
A confident smile on the face of a brave serviceman, or in this case, a Navy man. Not many recruiting posters depicted soldiers with frowns, but smiles.
A smiling Air Force pilot is shown on this vintage war poster that was probably used to keep up the country's morale during World War I and II.
A smiling Air Force pilot is shown on this vintage war poster that was probably used to keep up the country's morale during World War I and II.
Servicemen were sometimes shown in action on war posters such as this soldier about to unload a hand grenade against some enemy soldiers.
Servicemen were sometimes shown in action on war posters such as this soldier about to unload a hand grenade against some enemy soldiers.
The backbone of the war effort was the hard-working men and women back home in plants and factories that had been converted from making goods, to war materials.
The backbone of the war effort was the hard-working men and women back home in plants and factories that had been converted from making goods, to war materials.
The face of determination, courage and never-say-die is seen on this American serviceman. This poster alone sparked the patriotism of many Americans to keep the war effort strong.
The face of determination, courage and never-say-die is seen on this American serviceman. This poster alone sparked the patriotism of many Americans to keep the war effort strong.
She may be tattered and frayed, but may she ever fly in freedom and peace. Our beloved Old Glory, the Stars and Stripes.
She may be tattered and frayed, but may she ever fly in freedom and peace. Our beloved Old Glory, the Stars and Stripes.
Norman Rockwell might have been commissioned to paint this war poster showing some American family sitting down to eat from a bountiful table. Reasons to support the Armed Forces.
Norman Rockwell might have been commissioned to paint this war poster showing some American family sitting down to eat from a bountiful table. Reasons to support the Armed Forces.
Always vigilant. Always aware of enemy forces. This Air Force gunner is ready to take on the world of evil if necessary to keep America free.
Always vigilant. Always aware of enemy forces. This Air Force gunner is ready to take on the world of evil if necessary to keep America free.

Pictures Speak More Than A Thousand Words . . .

and this is why I chose to display these vintage war posters. I was too young to remember any of World War I and II, but my dad, the late Austin Avery, and my uncle Dow Terry, both of Hamilton, Alabama would talk in length of their time spent in the service.

My dad was in the Air Force and my uncle Dow, was a master sergeant in World War II. I am extremely proud of these guys, who with their willing to sacrifice their lives if needed, helped to keep my country, The United States, free, strong and proud.

I willingly salute Austin, Dow, and all members of our Armed Forces now serving in Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as their families, and families of those valored veterans of all of our nation's wars and that, brothers, DOES include Vietnam.

You deserve our respect and appreciation.

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Comments 11 comments

daskittlez69 profile image

daskittlez69 5 years ago from midwest

Thanks for the Hub.


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 5 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

No, thank YOU for reading this. My pleasure, daskittleaz69


jjackson786 profile image

jjackson786 5 years ago from Pennsylvania

Really enjoyed the pictures!


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 5 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

jjackson786, THANK YOU SO MUCH for your comment. This one touched me as I did it. I will have to take some time to regroup before going on. Thanks again.


frugalfamily profile image

frugalfamily 5 years ago from Houston, TX

Well worth the read. Up and beautiful.


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 5 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

frugalfamily, THANK YOU SO MUCH for your warm comment on this story. I am not as good a writer as you or the other writers, but I love to try. Thanks again for making my day. I shall not forget it. KENNETH


danfresnourban profile image

danfresnourban 5 years ago from Fresno, CA

Beautiful and a great reminder of how we joined together as a nation to do what we had to do. Definitely confirmation of our country's greatness. Thank you for sharing.


kenneth avery 5 years ago

THANK YOU, danfresnourban, for that uplifting comment. I did my best, but these guys and gals in our past, as well as in our present, DESERVE our Respect and Honor! Thanks again.


Judi Bee profile image

Judi Bee 5 years ago from UK

Hi Kenneth - thanks for sharing these superb images, still powerful after so many years. Also timely as here in the UK and Commonwealth countries we are on the run-up to Remembrance Day, which for us is the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month - the time the guns fell silent on the Western Front in 1918.

Shared on Facebook and Tweeted :-)


grand old lady profile image

grand old lady 2 years ago from Philippines

They say a picture paints 1,000 words, and these posters are very revealing of those days. They are cultural treasures and I feel so lucky to have been able to view all of them at once in your hub. How you managed to get them all together, I don't know but they are a nice way to turn the pages of history.


kenneth avery profile image

kenneth avery 2 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama Author

Thank you, Dear grand old lady (who is NOT old),

your comment means a lot.

And you mean a lot to me.

These posters were sent to me via email years ago by another writer friend of mine from years ago.

Frankly, I had forgotten this hub until I saw the notification that you had commented on it.

Thanks.

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