How to Draw a Treble Clef (Step by Step Instructions)

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Sheet music is an art form, just like the beautiful sounds it produces through instruments. Keys, or clefs, are used to tell a musician which notes to play when the clef is on a specific line of the stave. The G-clef, or "treble" clef, is commonly used and very fancy looking, so it's popular for tattoos and other artwork.

Treble Clef?

Although the G-clef is referred to as the treble clef, it's only a treble clef when the "curl" on the bottom half of the clef encircles the second line up from the bottom of the stave. Because the treble clef is the only G-clef still in use these days (the other is the "French violin clef", which "curls" around the first line up from the bottom of the stave), everyone just calls it a treble clef.

How to Draw a Treble Clef on a Stave

The best place to start creating art with treble clefs is learning how to draw a basic, plain one. After you master the curves and the angles, you'll be able to draw or paint anything you want using this lovely key!

The first treble clef we're going to draw will use a stave as a guide. This way you'll be able to learn the proportions of the parts of the treble clef, and eventually be able to correctly draw it freehand.

You could draw your own stave, or you can find one here to print out. It's free!

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Step-by-Step:

  1. (Remember: A G-clef starts from the bottom!) Starting below the lines of the stave, draw a line upward, leaning slightly to the left. End the line at the top line.
  2. Draw a loop with a very soft point (kind of like a sunflower seed's shape), ending the loop on the third line from the top.
  3. Draw a curve that hits the bottom line of the stave, then begins to point back upward.
  4. Draw the loop at the bottom, making sure that it doesn't rise above the third line, and that it goes around the second line of the stave. Remember that it's more of a curl than a spiral.
  5. Thicken your treble clef in the necessary places, like the very bottom, the "neck", and the top of the lower curl.
  6. Practice makes perfect!

For instruction purposes, I stopped at different points of the clef. However, when you master drawing this key, you won't have to stop once from start to finish.

How to Draw a Treble Clef Freehand

Drawing a treble clef freehand is the step you must master before you can let your creativity run wild. After you've gotten the hang of drawing its basic shape, you can concentrate on making unique clefs.

Step-by Step:

  1. On sheet music, the treble clef begins with a filled in circle.
  2. From the bottom of the circle, draw a curved line that goes downward before going back upward at an angle leaning slightly to the left.
  3. Afterwards, make a loop that is shaped like an upside-down teardrop. Don't make this loop too large or else there won't be room for the bottom loop.
  4. Draw a curve that sticks out to the left, meeting the clef just above the circle starting point.
  5. Make one more "curl" that crosses over the first line you made, and almost touches it on the inside (the star in step 5 shows where the curl shouldn't touch the line again).

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Things to Watch Out For:

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How to Draw a Floral Treble Clef

Now that you've got the hang of the basics, it's time to make your own unique treble clef. You can do whatever you want with it, from working leaves and vines into its curves, or creating a treble clef out of fire.

In this tutorial, I'm going to incorporate flowers into my treble clef. Your clef can be anything you would like it to be!

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Step-by-Step:

  1. Start by lightly drawing a treble clef with a pencil so that you have a basic skeleton to add on to later. Make sure to make your pencil strokes light so that you can erase them later.
  2. Next, make wispy lines branching out from the clef. If you keep all the lines generally going the same direction, it looks smooth and helps to keep the original shape intact.
  3. Add a few wisps here and there to give it a more detailed, natural look.
  4. Add various flowers to different parts of the clef, mixing up sizes, the direction the flowers are facing, and amount of flowers in each bunch.
  5. Clean up your lines, and add shading where necessary.

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Comments 2 comments

NornsMercy profile image

NornsMercy 3 years ago from Charlotte, NC Author

Thanks for reading, Dbro! This hub was fun. I had to stop myself from drawing hundreds of different kinds of clefs. :)


Dbro profile image

Dbro 3 years ago from Texas, USA

What a fun hub! I especially like the floral treble clef. I appreciate how many photos you used to illustrate the drawing instructions. This made the instructions "come to life." Thanks for taking the time to give such detailed instructions. Lots of good information here.

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