Lazy Daisy Embroidery Stitch

A flower made using the lazy daisy stitch and stem stitch.
A flower made using the lazy daisy stitch and stem stitch. | Source

The lazy daisy stitch, also known as the detached chain stitch, is a really beautiful stitch and one of my personal favorites. This stitch requires a bit more technique than most stitches, but is still fun to make. The nice thing about this stitch is that you can create a wide number of things with it.

The idea behind this stitch, which is essentially tying down a loose piece of floss, is one you'll be using a lot in embroidery. This stitch is related to a number of other stitches and you'll see later that you'll be either using this stitch quite a bit (or something very similar.) The reason I like this stitch so much is because I can create quick, but pretty daisies with it. Perhaps this is how this stitch got its name.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Figure 1: Make a very small running stitch by pushing your needle through very closely to where you came up.Figure 2: Leave a small loop however large you would like your petal to be.Figure 3: Pull the needle out on the inside of the loop.Figure 4: Push the needle back in on the outside of the loop to "tie down" your petal.Your first lazy daisy stitch.
Figure 1: Make a very small running stitch by pushing your needle through very closely to where you came up.
Figure 1: Make a very small running stitch by pushing your needle through very closely to where you came up. | Source
Figure 2: Leave a small loop however large you would like your petal to be.
Figure 2: Leave a small loop however large you would like your petal to be. | Source
Figure 3: Pull the needle out on the inside of the loop.
Figure 3: Pull the needle out on the inside of the loop. | Source
Figure 4: Push the needle back in on the outside of the loop to "tie down" your petal.
Figure 4: Push the needle back in on the outside of the loop to "tie down" your petal. | Source
Your first lazy daisy stitch.
Your first lazy daisy stitch. | Source

Your First Lazy Daisy Stitch

To create a lazy daisy, you will need to know how to make a running stitch.

  1. Start out by making a very small running stitch (figure 1), but don't pull your thread so that it's taut as you would do with most stitches. Instead, leave a small loop (figure 2.) This will later be the "petal" in your lazy daisy stitch.
  2. With your fingers, flatten out your loop into the desired shape.
  3. Tie down the petal by pulling the needle through, making sure not to pull on the loop on the inside of your loop (figure 3.) Then, push your needle down on the outside of the petal (figure 4.)
  4. Congratulations, you've created your first lazy daisy stitch! To continue making more lazy daisy stitches (to make a flower design), pull your needle out near where your first running stitch (figure 5) was made (this will be your flower's center) before making another loop.

Figure 5: Starting your next lazy daisy.
Figure 5: Starting your next lazy daisy. | Source

Tips for Making Fabulous Stitches

While making this stitch, it's important to avoid pulling on the loop while tying it down. This is the main challenge of lazy daisy stitches. Once you've got this technique down pat, you will ace the entire stitch.

Another thing to keep in mind is the size of the loops. A group of lazy daisy stitches looks best if all the loops have a similar size and shape. It's a good idea to compare your latest stitch with nearby stitches before tying it down.

Practice makes perfect in embroidery. You'll ace this stitch in no time if you play around with it. Make tons of lazy daisy stitches. If you go around the "center" with your stitches, you'll create an flower (as pictured). You can try different colors and alternating petal sizes to mix things up. You can also "stack" this stitch for a marigold-style flower.

If you want to add a stem to your flower (as pictured above) add some stem stitches. This flower design is cute and looks really impressive (it's one of my favorite embroidered flower designs), even though it's fairly easy to make.

More by this Author


Comments 1 comment

RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

Enjoying your embroidery tutorials. I'm hoping to do some embroidery work for granddaughters next year. Looking forward to more of your work. Thanks!

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working