53 Macrophotography / Microphotography Images of Insects Plus Video

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The praying mantis is one of my favorite insects. From the predatory way in which it moves, to the almost intellectual way it turns or cocks its head to look at you, it is a fascinating creature.

In the first photo, the mouth parts are clearly visible. In the bottom photo the mantis seems to be smiling, although it is missing one antenna.

To watch a video of the life cycle of a praying mantis, click here.


Australian Leaf Insect
Australian Leaf Insect | Source
stick-insect from Papua
stick-insect from Papua | Source
It is easy to see why this insect is called a Leaf Insect.
It is easy to see why this insect is called a Leaf Insect. | Source


Welcome to the wonderful world of insects delivered as only macrophotography can do it. Insects can move very quickly; therefore, we often do not get the opportunity to view them for very long or very well. By viewing insects through the use of macrophotography, we not only have the opportunity to see the details but we are able to see them more clearly since our subjects are presented even larger than life.

That is the definition of macrophotography - being able to present images that are up close and personal, but being able to do it at a scale that is full scale or larger.

Enjoy this journey through the wonderful world of the macrophotography of insects!


Stag Beetle
Stag Beetle | Source
An amazing Insect
An amazing Insect | Source
Umbonia crassicornis (F Membracidae)
Umbonia crassicornis (F Membracidae) | Source


Despite its vibrant color, each one of the insects above appears to be an individual thorn on a branch. As a group, they do a wonderful job of camouflage.

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Close-ups of insects can many times have an almost other-worldly feel to them.



It is almost hard to believe that we share this world with these creatures without ever really "seeing" them.



And when we do see them in a way that only macrophotography allows us to view them, they appear many times as if they are aliens from another planet.



For many people, these are the things that nightmares are made of!


What a nose! And in a color that no one can miss too!

This insect appears as if it has a cold and has had to blow one too many times!

But it has such vivid colors and intricate textures on its wings.

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This interesting little critter seems to carry his little broom with him everywhere he goes.


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These two insects are the same bug, just at different stages of life. The adult ladybug, or lady beetle, has a hard shell.


The nymph seems to have small branches growing from its body! The nymph has a softer body, more like that of a caterpillar.

The poodles of the bug world.
The poodles of the bug world. | Source
Leaf Hopper: the veining and coloration on its wings provide a very interesting display.
Leaf Hopper: the veining and coloration on its wings provide a very interesting display. | Source


The walking stick has always fascinated me. Maybe it has something to do with the fact that it reminds me of a praying mantis. But I think it has to do more with the first time I saw one.

I had crawled up into a tree and had been sitting there a while just staring at the branches around me. Even as a young child nature fascinated me. When one of those twigs moved, I was startled and instantly curious. What I found was the first of many walking sticks I would see in my life.

I have not personally seen one of the "fancy" walking sticks as the one that is pictured below, but I hope to some day.

Can you see the male on the back of the female?


Walking Stick
Walking Stick | Source
Egg of a Walking Stick
Egg of a Walking Stick | Source


The walking stick pictured below is closer to the type of walking sticks I normally see.


Walking Stick
Walking Stick | Source
Common House Fly
Common House Fly | Source


It would be easy to believe that the above image of the common house fly is really that of an alien creature. This face is one that only a mother could love. The eyes on insects are always so incredible. Even a common fly's eyes are amazing.

But what a wonderful view of the eyes, and the really grotesque mouth parts. The hairs that are on top of the head appear to have been parted and then combed together again. Look at the furry face.

Do you see the two golden tube like appendages above its mouth? Now look at the small eyelash type antenna that are coming from the same base. Those are so infinitely small, and yet so clear in this image!

Imagine how small the fly really is, and then think how very small the drops of water are; and macrophotography has made it possible for us to see all this.


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This emperor scorpion, also known as an imperial scorpion (Pandinus imperator), is a species of scorpion native to Africa.

One would not want to get too close to one of these creatures. Look at the lethal tip of the stinger, and notice that the stinger is a different color than the rest of the scorpion. The crab-like claws of the scorpion are used to grasp its prey while it delivers its deadly thrust.


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The antenna on the above insect reminds me of the horns on a wild sheep. Notice the spotted color on its body!


Click thumbnail to view full-size
Ant: the mouth parts are interesting looking from this angle. Notice the segmented legs and antenna and the texture of the leaf. In a larger version that can be obtained by clicking on image, notice the hair on the ant's tail parts.Bush Cockroach: the texture and coloration of both the roach and the wood that it is on is amazing, especially in a larger picture that can be obtained by clicking on picture.The colors and textures of these insects and the leaves that they are attached to is a sight to behold. The wings of the insects is especially interesting.Christmas Beetle: Look closely at the hair on the body and legs, the segmented legs, the texture of the head and body and the iridescence of color.Beetle: Notice the segmented antenna, the texture of the body, the barbs on the legs, the mandibles and the iridescent color.The macrophotographic image of this beetle is small. Consider the size of this drop of water. Click on image to see a larger image.
Ant: the mouth parts are interesting looking from this angle. Notice the segmented legs and antenna and the texture of the leaf. In a larger version that can be obtained by clicking on image, notice the hair on the ant's tail parts.
Ant: the mouth parts are interesting looking from this angle. Notice the segmented legs and antenna and the texture of the leaf. In a larger version that can be obtained by clicking on image, notice the hair on the ant's tail parts. | Source
Bush Cockroach: the texture and coloration of both the roach and the wood that it is on is amazing, especially in a larger picture that can be obtained by clicking on picture.
Bush Cockroach: the texture and coloration of both the roach and the wood that it is on is amazing, especially in a larger picture that can be obtained by clicking on picture. | Source
The colors and textures of these insects and the leaves that they are attached to is a sight to behold. The wings of the insects is especially interesting.
The colors and textures of these insects and the leaves that they are attached to is a sight to behold. The wings of the insects is especially interesting. | Source
Christmas Beetle: Look closely at the hair on the body and legs, the segmented legs, the texture of the head and body and the iridescence of color.
Christmas Beetle: Look closely at the hair on the body and legs, the segmented legs, the texture of the head and body and the iridescence of color. | Source
Beetle: Notice the segmented antenna, the texture of the body, the barbs on the legs, the mandibles and the iridescent color.
Beetle: Notice the segmented antenna, the texture of the body, the barbs on the legs, the mandibles and the iridescent color. | Source
The macrophotographic image of this beetle is small. Consider the size of this drop of water. Click on image to see a larger image.
The macrophotographic image of this beetle is small. Consider the size of this drop of water. Click on image to see a larger image. | Source
Click thumbnail to view full-size
The shell on this insect looks almost translucent. Notice the eyes and the place where the legs meet the body.Baby Grasshopper: So many intricate details in this head on view. Notice the faceted eyes.Walking Stick: Notice the dots of color, the striations on the legs, the mouth parts, and the antenna where they meet the body. These are all fascinating areas to observe.
The shell on this insect looks almost translucent. Notice the eyes and the place where the legs meet the body.
The shell on this insect looks almost translucent. Notice the eyes and the place where the legs meet the body. | Source
Baby Grasshopper: So many intricate details in this head on view. Notice the faceted eyes.
Baby Grasshopper: So many intricate details in this head on view. Notice the faceted eyes. | Source
Walking Stick: Notice the dots of color, the striations on the legs, the mouth parts, and the antenna where they meet the body. These are all fascinating areas to observe.
Walking Stick: Notice the dots of color, the striations on the legs, the mouth parts, and the antenna where they meet the body. These are all fascinating areas to observe. | Source
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Looking at the grasshopper above reminds me of a time when I was much younger. I grew up on a farm. After the maize and corn were harvested, we put up electric fences around the fields so the cows could graze on the grains that had escaped the combines.

I was never brave enough to test the fence's potential shock value by touching it myself. But one day I came up with a bright idea. (Not so bright actually as you will soon see!) I caught a grasshopper and grasped its two hind legs between thumb and forefinger. I know you know where I am going with this.

I slowly moved the grasshopper toward the fence. When it got close enough, it reached out and grabbed the electric wire. I received the shock of a lifetime in more ways than one. And the poor grasshopper ... I hate to report, but he jumped right out of those legs and left me holding them.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
On this beetle, you can see the dimpled striping down the body of the beetle. You can see the facets on the eyes. And the iridescence is very beautiful. The segmenting on the antenna is fantastic!Side view of the Red Faced Beetle.Red Faced Beetle: From the stop, the texture on the shell of the beetle is immediately apparent.Christmas Beetle: The iridescent body parts provide a wonderful contrast to the brown body parts.
On this beetle, you can see the dimpled striping down the body of the beetle. You can see the facets on the eyes. And the iridescence is very beautiful. The segmenting on the antenna is fantastic!
On this beetle, you can see the dimpled striping down the body of the beetle. You can see the facets on the eyes. And the iridescence is very beautiful. The segmenting on the antenna is fantastic! | Source
Side view of the Red Faced Beetle.
Side view of the Red Faced Beetle. | Source
Red Faced Beetle: From the stop, the texture on the shell of the beetle is immediately apparent.
Red Faced Beetle: From the stop, the texture on the shell of the beetle is immediately apparent. | Source
Christmas Beetle: The iridescent body parts provide a wonderful contrast to the brown body parts.
Christmas Beetle: The iridescent body parts provide a wonderful contrast to the brown body parts. | Source
Baby Grasshopper Eating Rose
Baby Grasshopper Eating Rose | Source


Notice the light purple and white strips on the rear legs. Also notice the stripes on the antenna. Details such as these are lost to us in our every day experiences. Grasshoppers move to fast to see these details. By catching them in pictures using macrophotography, we are able to see and appreciate the little details that often go unnoticed.


Although some of the clarity is lost in the extracted image below, it does allow you to view some details more clearly. One of those details is the "v" markings on the grasshopper's legs.


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The above image captures the imagination with the colors, curves and textures that are so clearing depicted.


The detail in this extracted view is truly amazing. It almost appears as if the wings are pixelated, and each one was colored in individually. Notice also, the fuzz or hair on the bottom edge of the wings. There is so much detail in one tiny area of this insect's (probably a leaf hopper's) body.


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An ant carrying food much bigger than it is! Notice the hairs on its body! Look at the details of the legs especially the joints.


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Cockroach: The detail on this cockroach is utterly amazing. Notice the wings and its legs. Notice also, the coloration on the plate over the head.

And if you are wondering what it is walking on - that is an apple. In these images you see an apple in a whole new light.

The wings and leg details are even more visible in the larger picture below. Notice the hair on the legs. Detail extracted from image above.


Extracted from image above.
Extracted from image above.
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The detail on this Eucalyptus Borer is amazing. The dimples on the wing covers and the irregular spots make for a very interesting pattern. The hairs on the legs and the segments on the legs and antenna is so clearly depicted. Notice even the dirt that is on the mandibles that the borer has removed from its feet.The antenna appear to be coming out of its eye!


This dirt, or debris, is even more apparent when viewed on the enlarged and extracted view below.


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Click thumbnail to view full-size
The wings of this beetle, which are normally hidden under its shell, are easily viewed in this image.The iridescent colors on this insect makes it appear almost jewel like. The segments on its antenna are particularly interesting.The eyes and the cutting mouth parts of this grasshopper are amazing.The beauty of these wings is clearly visible.
The wings of this beetle, which are normally hidden under its shell, are easily viewed in this image.
The wings of this beetle, which are normally hidden under its shell, are easily viewed in this image. | Source
Source
The iridescent colors on this insect makes it appear almost jewel like. The segments on its antenna are particularly interesting.
The iridescent colors on this insect makes it appear almost jewel like. The segments on its antenna are particularly interesting. | Source
The eyes and the cutting mouth parts of this grasshopper are amazing.
The eyes and the cutting mouth parts of this grasshopper are amazing. | Source
The beauty of these wings is clearly visible.
The beauty of these wings is clearly visible. | Source


Through the macrophotography of insects, we have been able to enter an "alien" environment. Macrophotography brings the insect world to us in a fascinating yet almost repulsive way at the same time.

I hope you have enjoyed this journey through macrophotography and will join me again:


All Rights Reserved

Copyright © 2011 Cindy Murdoch



Other Sites with Macrophotography that Might Interest You!

Although this site is not entirely insects, it does have some amazing insect shots! It is truly a must see! I wish it were mine to share with you! It is that good!


More by this Author


Comments: "53 Macrophotography / Microphotography Images of Insects Plus Video" 75 comments

fidencio1 profile image

fidencio1 5 years ago from Louisiana

I really enjoyed these pictures. Great detail!


SJmorningsun25 5 years ago

Astounding images! Thank you for collecting them, and taking the time to study, describe, and illuminate them for us. I admit I will probably regret looking so closely when I dream of giant cockroaches tonight . . . I'm a strong disliker of bugs in general--but it is undeniable that they are intricate, delicate, beautiful, and as God-wrought as any of us are. Bravo! Voted up and awesome.


brittanytodd profile image

brittanytodd 5 years ago from Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

Another great hub! Thanks for sharing. These photos are so great.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

Nice! I enjoyed your comments about the photographs. I think that is important as it takes the viewer on the path that you want to represent in macro work. Nicely done... The photo of the housefly's face is my favorite.


5 years ago

Voted up.

Some amazing photography there, too. Looks almost like you would do well working in the graphics department of a fashion house, producing attire and accessories which develop new and interesting color schemed based on nature!


VeronicaFarkas profile image

VeronicaFarkas 5 years ago from Ohio, USA

Oh my! I had goosebumps looking through the pictures! Eek! Although somewhat creepy, these insects are definitely unique and beautiful! Thanks for sharing. =]


freecampingaussie profile image

freecampingaussie 5 years ago from Southern Spain

What an awesome hub !! Glad I came across you while hub hopping . I love your photos !Voting you up + facebook like, sharing etc !


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

fidencio1 - I am pleased that you enjoyed the hub. I appreciate you for stopping by and leaving a comment.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Hello, SJmorningsun25! You are right! God truly created many awesome things for our enjoyment. I hope you do not dream of these creatures. I am working on one about spiders and that is the hard one for me. Thanks for stopping by and reading.


leroy64 profile image

leroy64 5 years ago from Dallas, Texas (Oak Cliff)

It appears that we have another world at our feet. Thank you for a very enjoyable hub.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

brittanytodd - It was my pleasure. Thanks for stopping by!


LindaSmith1 profile image

LindaSmith1 5 years ago from USA

I wonder if that is a Tonka Alein Frog Insect


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - I thought you would be a praying mantis kind of guy instead of the house fly!

I'm glad you enjoyed it! Thanks for stopping by!


LindaSmith1 profile image

LindaSmith1 5 years ago from USA

Some of these are absolutely beautiful. Even the praying mantis has a cute face.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - thanks for the compliments. I really appreciate them.

I am pleased that you enjoyed the hub, and I'm sure I'll be seeing you around.

Thanks for stopping by!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

VeronicaFarkas - just wait til the spider one. I think it is next. That is one the one that gets me. I'll be glad when I am finished with it. Spiders give me the creeps, but the are also beautiful in their own way.

Thanks for stopping by, taking the time to read, and to comment.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

freecampingaussie - thank you so much. I very much appreciate the likes and shares. I am glad that you enjoyed it that much.

Thanks so much for stopping by, commenting and spending a little time with me.


5 years ago

homesteadbound: YW. And at least these insects look nicer than spiders!

SJmorningsun25: Exactly. Whether ppl call it Creatorial or intelligent design, it seems undeniable to us by the eye of faith, right?


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

leroy64 - we do indeed have another whole world all around us. I will be doing quite a few of these macro hubs. So if you like this kind of thing, they are coming.

Thanks for visiting, and for commenting.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Linda - which bug do you wonder if it is a Tonka Alien Frog Insect? I;m not sure which one you are talking about.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

LindaSmith1 - Some bugs really are beautiful, especially when viewed closely like this. I really do think the praying mantis looks intelligent, and cute.

thanks for stopping by!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - I do believe that God created many fascinating and wonderful things for our pleasure as well as His.

Thanks for stopping by, and I agree - at least these aren't spiders.


5 years ago

Amen! 'Fearfully and wonderfully made', as the Psalmist could say. Blessings.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - even down to the tiniest little hair on its body.

Thanks!


5 years ago

It's just wonderful to think of the hand of our gracious God in this way. Blessings.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Very true, and blessings to you.


fordie profile image

fordie 5 years ago from China

Wonderful photos. Will keep this hub open until my boys get home from school


MsDora profile image

MsDora 5 years ago from The Caribbean

Wonderful photography and great commentary. Even the cockroach seems admirable.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 5 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

My father gave my mother a 35mm SLR for Christmas many years ago, and she later bought a lens that allowed her to take shots like these, although she used it mostly for flowers.

Excellent Hub, homesteadbound.


carol3san profile image

carol3san 5 years ago from Hollywood Florida

Great hub homesteadbound. I must admit that some of those images looks a little scary to me. I can tell that you put a lot of work into this. You get a vote up.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

fordie! I hope your boys enjoyed the pictures.

Thanks for stopping by!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

MsDora - even the cockroach looks admirable ... that's saying a lot! I'm pleased that you enjoyed the commentary as well as the pictures. Thanks for journeying to the land of insects with me!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

WillStarr - if your mother likes photography, I bet she loves being able to take pictures like this. I try to get close pictures but I don't have these capabilities.

Thanks for stopping by!


5 years ago

Digital has revolutionized private photography, I think. (Largely gone are the days of printed snaps.) Blessings.


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 5 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

Hi, homesteadbound,

Sadly, Mom has been gone for nearly ten years now. I inherited her camera, but the mercury battery it required is now outlawed, and there is no replacement. I've tried.


kids-toy-box profile image

kids-toy-box 5 years ago

Amazing Photos!What beauties - looks like the chameleon is not the only master of camouflage.


anndavis25 profile image

anndavis25 5 years ago from Clearwater, Fl.

Oh my goodness. So real. I might dream about them tonight. I'm saving this for my grandson, who is crazy about bugs. Nice hub. Up, useful, and awesome!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

carol3san - Thanks! These hubs look like they don't have a lot of words, but if you count the text typed in under the words it has a tremendous amount. If you think these are scary, you might want to avoid the spider one. I start itching because my skin feels like it is crawling when I look at that hub, and I finished it right before bedtime - not a real good move! Thanks for stopping by and for the votes.


5 years ago

Agreed about the spiders ... (1)

(But do your own thing with your skin.)

Blessings.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - I believe you are right. I is so much more convenient to view photos on the computer. And with macrophotography, it is even better. Thanks


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

WillStarr- so sorry about your mother.

It's too bad about the camera. Technology seems to get us coming and going, doesn't it?

Thanks for stopping by!


5 years ago

I like the word macrophotography; I'd not heard it before. (I'm wondering whether it could also be microphotography, and whether there is a difference.)

Blessings.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

Will Starr: sometimes those lens will fit other cameras, even across brands. It was much easier with the 35mm SLR to fit lenses then it is with digital. They even make adapters... SLR bodies can be found for cheap, though some of them still cost a fortune. Keep trying!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

kids-toy-box - I hope your grandson enjoys the pictures.

Thanks for stopping by!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - thanks for sharing the advice with WillStarr.

Great hubber you are!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

anndavis25 - I hope your grandson enjoys the pictures.

Kids-toy-box - sorry, looked at the wrong entry. Bugs can indeed be great at disguise. Sometimes they can use it to catch prey and sometimes they use it to avoid being prey!

Thanks to both of you for stopping by and sorry for the mix-up.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - great question. Micro and macro photography are the same thing according to slrphotographyguide.com.

Thanks for stopping by


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

I think the difference is in the type of lens and how the lens reacts to the subject... This may be truer in digital then in traditional SLRs


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - thanks for the clarification.


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

They are kind of the same thing though slightly different from photographic and art perspectives....


5 years ago

Thank-you, homesteadbound, for the explanation, anyway. I guess I'm a bit puzzled about the macro-/micro- paradigm. I thought I had it figured with micro- and macro-economics. But then there is also the microskirt which seems to be a word used now; whereas I always remember it as a miniskirt; I'm not sure if there is a difference? Maybe microskirt means more mini than a miniskirt? or maybe, as with microphotography and macrophotography they are really the same thing?

(Not sure.)

Blessings.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - you are the changingest person I've ever seen. Just when I recognize your avatar, you change it again.

Thanks for the clarification.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - it confused me for a while also, because I was looking at it like you were.

As far as the skirts go, I really am only sure about one thing - I'm not wearing either of them. LOL

Thanks for stopping by!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

Macro means big and Micro means small. In photography: Macro means representing an object at a 1:1 ratio... Micro in photography means the same thing except that with Micro photography we are blowing something larger then its 1:1 ratio. Micro photography and digital macro photography are pretty much the same concept but there is a difference and slight as it may be... it is still a difference. Micro photography... think microscope and the digital photography that is used there. To make things even worse... both are very different then close up photography...


5 years ago

Yes, I was confused, too.

Re. the skirts, well, you must know. Just to bear in mind that young women aged 24/25 in 1964/65, who would have worn the genuine, real McCoy miniskirts, would now be over 70. Nice little old ladies today were the nice young ladies then; we can be sure of this, can't we, now? (Not sure whether the hems had much to do with it, either. Each generation has its subjective customs.)

Blessings.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - thanks for the clarification.

f- I hope that helps to clear things up for you a bit.

Thanks to both of you for stopping by!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 5 years ago from Sacramento, California

oh you're welcome HSB


WillStarr profile image

WillStarr 5 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

"Will Starr: sometimes those lens will fit other cameras, even across brands."

And I knew that, but it never occurred to me. Thanks, davenmidtown!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

davenmidtown - nicely done for WillStarr!

Thank both of you for visiting!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

I added a video of the life cycle of the praying mantis.


5 years ago

It's a really unusual looking insect, the praying mantis. I did wonder if it was spelt, preying mantis, because it preys upon its food victims, but praying, as in prayer, is the right spelling, of course.

(Almost like spiders to think about. Ugh!) (smile)

Blessings.


suziecat7 profile image

suziecat7 5 years ago from Asheville, NC

Wow - Amazing stuff. I've always liked to look at bugs. These are fantastic. Thanks! Rated up and shared.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

Yes, f, it is praying because the hold their arms like they are in prayer. Fortunately for me they do not remind me of spiders because I love them. Just picked one up a couple days ago.

Thanks for coming by!


5 years ago

Well, I guess it pays to like them! You guys down there must have similar semi-desert insects and fauna that they have in Mexico, too, so if you like such insects and creatures, I guess it's just as well. Blessings.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

f - since I live in Northern Texas, not too much the same. Texas is a very big place.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

suziecat7 - I am very happy that you enjoyed the hub. I hope you have a chance to view some of the others also.

Thanks for stopping by, for following and for sharing.


5 years ago

Oh okay, I see. I saw someplace a mention of the Texas panhandle, which I think is Transpecos, isn't it? Blessings.


natures47friend profile image

natures47friend 5 years ago from Sunny Art Deco Napier, New Zealand.

So cool!Great photos and you were a meany to that poor grasshopper, weren't you? I used to sit in trees and watch insects. We had a peach tree that I'd sit for hours and watch the honey bees. I even did entomology at uni...tried teaching my daughter about insects and spiders, and she seems yo have followed girls at school and hates spiders...peer pressure I think!...lol

There are lots of insects that I did not know existed......we all live in different countries so we would not notice.

You know I was checking Twitter and Suziecat had shared this hub...traffic is flowing!

Voted up and four buttons. The insect world is your oyster....lol


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 5 years ago from Texas Author

natures47friend, glad to see you again! I still feel a little bad about that poor grasshopper - 40 years later!

Thanks so much for stopping by! Have a great day!


Theocharis V profile image

Theocharis V 4 years ago from Piraeus, Greece

Very nice hub. Super amazing photos!


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 4 years ago from Texas Author

Theocharis V - I am pleased that you enjoyed this hub. I have always been fascinated by macrophotography. The up close and personal images are just so cool. Thanks for stopping by!


GiftedGrandma profile image

GiftedGrandma 4 years ago from USA

Nice hub.. I love photography and macro is a favorite.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 4 years ago from Texas Author

GiftedGrandma - I am happy that you enjoyed it! Thanks for stopping by!


poetryman6969 profile image

poetryman6969 17 months ago

Such beautiful photos. I really enjoy macro photography.


homesteadbound profile image

homesteadbound 16 months ago from Texas Author

poetryman6969 - I am pleased that you enjoyed the hub. Thanks so much for stopping by.

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