Monster Pix – Wussy Cost

This piece of cake is lots of fun

How to make great big poster-size prints from your tiny snapshots is the goal. You will be able to understand how easy that is to do by the time you finish reading the few and easy steps described here. I'm just guessing, but it may be that your joy would not be complete with just “easy.” For that reason I will tell you where I got the computer software used to make those “monster pix” - all for simply downloading the programs to my computer

You begin your poster-making by selecting the original, small, snapshot made with your ordinary digital camera. This image began as a "JPEG" format image and was later converted to the "TIFF" format
You begin your poster-making by selecting the original, small, snapshot made with your ordinary digital camera. This image began as a "JPEG" format image and was later converted to the "TIFF" format | Source

Equipment and software used

In addition, the camera I used to make those original little snapshots was very ordinary – you could run down to the used camera store and buy one like mine for 20 bucks or so...

Also, the two printers I used to make the posters illustrated here are very ordinary home computer printers. The printer that outputs in color, for example, cost $30 brand new in the computer store several weeks ago, and the other is a plain black-cartridge laser printer of Japanese heritage.

All of the software with which the images were processed was obtained from SourceForge.net, an Internet resource available to all.

Downloadable software for poster-making

Gimp 2.8: an image editor with which you can input photos of one format and output them with another format. Not all image formats work in all programs. Thus changing the original format to another format can not only be useful, sometimes it is necessary.

All you need do to change the formatting of your original image is to enter the image into Gimp and select the format you want, after which you send the newly formatted image to disk storage for later use. Changing the formatting automatically changes the image name, so your original snapshot will be preserved along with the new image.

PosteRazor: an image “splitter” which you use to divide your original photo into the greatly enlarged but equal-size sections you use to create your poster.

PosteRazor prefers that you input “TIFF” formatted images. JPEG formatted images will work within the program, but sometimes PosteRazor loses track of the dimensions of the printout pages. “TIFF” format images do not suffer from that problem. For example, I wanted to make a poster from a “JPEG” image on four printed pages, but the program decided that the output would be on six sheets of paper. When I reformatted the image into “TIFF” format, the output poster was on four pages as I had wanted it to be.

Really EASY - just follow the screenshots below

Here are the poster-making steps as screenshots of program screens on my computer during the making.

Each poster began as a small snapshot. Both of the two snapshots were views of some close-by Houston, Texas downtown areas through the thick glass window of the tall Harris County Civil Courthouse. The posters sized out at approximately two feet square. The posters shown here were not very carefully assembled, and they were printed on ordinary low-cost printer paper. You can assume much better results from the use of better assembly practice and heavier paper stock – like matte finish photo sheets instead of 20-pound typing paper.

Step one calls for the input of the snapshot from which you want a poster-size print. The format of this photo was earlier changed from JPEG into TIFF in order to work better with the computer program
Step one calls for the input of the snapshot from which you want a poster-size print. The format of this photo was earlier changed from JPEG into TIFF in order to work better with the computer program | Source
This is where you choose the image orientation (portrait or landscape) and the dimensions of the border space surrounding the poster image
This is where you choose the image orientation (portrait or landscape) and the dimensions of the border space surrounding the poster image | Source
Here you select how much overlap you intend there to be for purposes of joining the separate pages that comprise the entire poster image
Here you select how much overlap you intend there to be for purposes of joining the separate pages that comprise the entire poster image | Source
This is where you define the size of your poster; that is, the number of separate printout pages that will be pasted together to form the whole. The lines shown define whole pages - this one showing 4 pages
This is where you define the size of your poster; that is, the number of separate printout pages that will be pasted together to form the whole. The lines shown define whole pages - this one showing 4 pages | Source
Finally, you save the separate pages to your disk storage. From there you can print them at your printer or do so immediately during the save operation
Finally, you save the separate pages to your disk storage. From there you can print them at your printer or do so immediately during the save operation | Source
Here is the poster made from the little snapshot. The final size of the poster is approximately 2 square feet. A single-piece printout that size would cost about $15 at the commercial copy shops
Here is the poster made from the little snapshot. The final size of the poster is approximately 2 square feet. A single-piece printout that size would cost about $15 at the commercial copy shops | Source
This is another poster assembled from six separate image sheets made by splitting a single digital image. The images were printed on an ordinary black-cartridge laser printer. The color tinting was done with an image editor prior to poster-making.
This is another poster assembled from six separate image sheets made by splitting a single digital image. The images were printed on an ordinary black-cartridge laser printer. The color tinting was done with an image editor prior to poster-making. | Source

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8 comments

sallybea profile image

sallybea 3 years ago from Norfolk

Hi Gus,

This is all very useful information - have bookmarked this one for a later date. You have done such a great job on putting this one together. Thanks for sharing. Voted up.


GusTheRedneck profile image

GusTheRedneck 3 years ago from USA Author

Hello Sally (sallybea) -

Like everything else, a person learns to crawl before learning to walk. So it is with figuring out the many ins and outs of working with the PosteRazor software. Mostly, the thing worked nicely in the poster-making tasks when I worked with JPEG-format input photos - that is, when they were in the form of panoramic images. When the input photos were single frame JPEG images, the software took the bit between its teeth and disobeyed my desires for particular numbers of output pages. In that the software is "open source" stuff provided by an individual who assembled no user manual, there was no explanation for that problem - thus no solution readily at hand. Changing the input image format was a good guess. I am not Irish, but I had Irish luck. That was the solution to the problem.

Thanks for the kind comments.

Gus :-)))


drbj profile image

drbj 3 years ago from south Florida

Love the 'wussie cost' in your title, Gus. It grabbed my attention immediately. One day I will actually set aside the time to work on this poster-making procedure. Promise.


GusTheRedneck profile image

GusTheRedneck 3 years ago from USA Author

Hi Good Doctor bl (drbj) -

You have a huge choice of meanings for that "wussy" word. For something that indicates so little, it is a word of a large number of meanings- all describing much the same thing - "not much there..."

As to the example photo in color, I';ll stick that into my notebook and use it to gain entrance for my camera into the courthouse once again. "Yes sir. I'm back again to make some more photos a lot like this one..." I can hear that now.

I hope that you can pick up on this good stuff and have lots of fun listening to your buddies make nice noises about your photo skills. These "biggies" tend to elicit some favorable noise from folks.

Gus :-)))


Maren Morgan M-T profile image

Maren Morgan M-T 3 years ago from Pennsylvania

Wow - I don't think I need to make any posters, but i am glad you explained it all! Thanks, Gus.


GusTheRedneck profile image

GusTheRedneck 3 years ago from USA Author

Hi Maren (Maren Morgan M-T) -

For many years (and it may be that way still...) there was a play advertised on the light poles and building walls in the French Quarter of New Orleans - "Nobody likes a smart-ass."

I really hope that I did not explain it all as to the making of those posters. "Allesandro" (I think was his name) is the guy who put the PosteRazor program together and made it work - even without much of an explanation. His program is fun to use. Give it a whack sometime.

Gus :-)))


Mike Robbers profile image

Mike Robbers 3 years ago from London

Useful info and tips, Gus. As you mention printing out a poster is quite expensive so this an easy and cheap DIY way.


GusTheRedneck profile image

GusTheRedneck 3 years ago from USA Author

Здраво Мајк (Mike Robbers) -

First - thank you for your comments as to the poster printing. Money is hard enough to capture. Turning it loose when you need not do so is a bummer.

AND - did you get some of that chocolate pudding cake upon your return to your London digs?

Gus :-)))

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