National Gallery (Washington, D.C.)

This photograph of the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden and Fountain, Washington, D.C. was taken by AgnosticPreachersKid.
This photograph of the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden and Fountain, Washington, D.C. was taken by AgnosticPreachersKid. | Source

Have you ever visited Washington, DC?

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Artists Study Paintings

Artists learn to paint by studying paintings. They go to museums to study paintings, not just look at them.

They study the surface to which the paint was applied (wood or canvas or plaster, in the case of frescoes).

They study the tools used in applying the paint (a selection of brushes or painting knives), and they study the technique used (broad swaths of paint or tiny dots, thickly applied paint with a high degree of texture or thinly applied paint that’s as smooth as glass).

They also study the schools of painting (Renaissance, Impressionism, or Cubism, for instance), and they learn why the schools or styles of painting developed, who were the major and minor artists associated with that school, and why the school of painting died out, with no new canvases being created.

They study color—did the artist use primary colors only, or just pastels or muted tones? Did the artist use colors straight out of the tube of oil paint or were all colors blended?

I majored in Fine Arts in college. I was very fortunate in that I attended a state university in New Jersey which was situated no more than an hour’s drive from New York City (Manhattan). I had access to numerous museums and art galleries, and I would spend countless hours studying paintings.

Colonial Art in America

The American colonists did not disapprove of art, but they wanted their own art. They painted portraits, many of which look very provincial by today’s standards.

Until the end of the nineteenth century, Americans had neither the means nor the time to develop significant collections of paintings from Europe. They had no paintings to study. With no collections, American painters, with the exception of the few who were able to study in Europe, remained provincial.

No Museums until the 20th Century

The cure for the provincialism in American art was to study, learn, and understand the traditions of European painting. To do this, it was necessary to collect European art. This started happening around 1900. Museums were established on the east coast of the United States and in Chicago.

A privately endowed institution, the Corcoran Gallery, was established in Washington, D.C. in 1869, but there wasn’t any national art museum in the nation’s capital.

Have you ever visited the National Gallery?

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Establishment and Building of the National Gallery

The establishment of a national gallery was conceived, founded, and endowed by Andrew W. Mellon, who served as Secretary of the Treasury in the administrations of Presidents Harding and Coolidge, and was ambassador to the Court of St. James’s under President Hoover. As early as 1927, Mr. Mellon discussed the importance of having a national collection of paintings and sculpture, but it wasn’t until 1937 that a piece of land was selected for the gallery.

Ground was broken for the National Gallery, one of the largest marble buildings in the world, on a piece of land halfway between the Washington Monument and the Capitol. Mr. Mellon wanted the building to be erected in a style that would be timeless and that would harmonize with existing buildings in Washington. Classicism, the style which began in Greece, developed in Rome, and was revived in the Renaissance, was selected.

The National Gallery opened to the public in 1941.

National Gallery of Art

A markerNational Gallery, Washington, D.C. -
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC 20565, USA
[get directions]

Paintings by American Artists

The National Gallery of Art's collection includes paintings by artists from many countries. The paintings I'm showcasing in this article were all painted by artists who were born in the United States.

Gilbert Stuart's "Mrs. Richard Yates"

Gilbert Stuart (1755 - 1828) was born in Narragansett, Massachusets. He journeyed to London in 1769, at the age of 14, and studied with artist Benjamin West for five years. Stuart became one of London's most fashionable and sought-after portraitists.

"Mrs. Richard Yates" was painted in 1793, the year that Gilbert Stuart returned to the United States. Catherine Brass Yates was the wife of a New York businessman, an importer of products from England and India. She insisted upon sewing during the entire time she sat for Stuart's portrait.

Gilbert Stuart's "Mrs. Richard Yates" is in the public domain worldwide.
Gilbert Stuart's "Mrs. Richard Yates" is in the public domain worldwide. | Source

James Mc Neill Whistler's "The White Girl (Symphony in White No. 1)"

James Mc Neill Whistler (1834 - 1903) was another expatriate painter. Whistler was born in Massachusetts, but spent most of his time in Europe. Whistler painted "The White Girl (Symphony in White No. 1)" in 1863 while living in Paris, France. The artist was interested in Spanish painting during this period in his life. His painting technique and use of color are very reminiscent of that of Spanish painter Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez.

James Mc Neill Whistler's "The White Girl(Symphony in White No. 1)" is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.
James Mc Neill Whistler's "The White Girl(Symphony in White No. 1)" is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. | Source

Mary Cassatt's "The Boating Party"

Mary Cassatt, the daughter of a stockbroker, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1845. Cassatt lived most of her life in France. Her art grew out of her Parisian contacts with the artists in the Impressionist school of painting, and she exhibited her paintings with those artists.

Cassatt was most influenced by the work of Parisian artist Edgar Degas. Her style is a simplified version of his. Cassatt limited her subjects primarily to theater scenes and mother and child. I enjoy viewing the paintings of Edgar Degas very much. The paintings of Mary Cassatt leave me cold. Perhaps this is due to her oversimplification of style.

Mary Cassatt painted "The Boating Party" in 1893 - 1894. This painting is in the public domain in the United States because it copyright has expired.
Mary Cassatt painted "The Boating Party" in 1893 - 1894. This painting is in the public domain in the United States because it copyright has expired. | Source

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Comments 35 comments

Rusticliving profile image

Rusticliving 4 years ago from California

Oh My Gosh Daisy! I nearly fell off my chair when I saw my name and picture parody! I absolutely love your hub. I have never had the opportunity to visit the National Gallery, however, whenever I get the chance, I do visit museums and galleries locally. Wonderful job my dear. Thumbs way up on this one! Hub Hugs for including me. Lisa


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Lisa (Rusticliving),

Thanks for reading my Hub, being the first person to comment in it, and serving as one of my models.

This is my 9th painting parody Hub, and the end of the series is not in sight. I'm having such a great time creating the parodies and suprising my friends.

*****

I know that I surprised you, Lisa ... you were so shocked, you forgot to scatter the rose petals.


melbel profile image

melbel 4 years ago from New Buffalo, Michigan

Oh wow! I've never even seen the The White Girl (Symphony in White No. 1), but it's a really pretty painting! This has me really wanting to head out to an art museum and really take in what there is out there. It's been so long since I've been to an art museum!

Great hub, awesome to be included. Thank you!


Jools99 profile image

Jools99 4 years ago from North-East UK

Daisy, interesting info about Washington's National Gallery - my friend visited Washington a few years ago for about 3 days and didn't want to leave, she thought it was one of the most interesting places she had ever been.

Your models do their job very well again :o), Lisa, Mel, Jason (with his flowing locks), Cyndi and Christy all look great!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Melanie (melbel),

Thanks for reading my article and commenting in it. As soon as I saw the Whistler painting, I thought of you as being the perfect model for the parody. I was correct! You look terrific in that white dress.

If you get a chance, please check out my Hub "What is a Parody?" and my Rijksmuseum Hub.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Julie (jools99),

Thanks for reading and commenting in another of my Hubs. With the 8-hour time difference between California and England, I knew you would be one of the first readers to comment.

Washington, D.C. has a lot to offer visitors. I hope you have an opportunity to tour the various sites in our nation's capitol some day.


poshcoffeeco profile image

poshcoffeeco 4 years ago from Cambridgeshire

Daisy,

2 of the pictures look better than the originals, Jason and Lisa. Christy looks pretty hot also.

Great parody hub again.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Steve (poshcoffeeco),

Thanks for commenting. I'm glad you liked my parodies. You only mentioned the images. I hope you read the text, too.


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

Jason, Lisa, Cyndi, Mel and Christy all look great in their parodies! I like them all.

I enjoyed the text also. Well done!!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Linda (Sunshine),

Thanks for reading my latest painting parody article and commenting in it. I'm glad you liked the parodies.

What's especially fun for me is surprising the models, hearing what their reaction was when they first saw the parody in which they were featured,


Jason Marovich profile image

Jason Marovich 4 years ago from United States

"Bindo Altoviti was a rich banker born in Rome in 1491, but of Florentine origin. He was a cultured man who loved the arts." -- Wiki

Wow, it's like I was cloned from Bindo lol. After seeing your parody of Raphael's portrait, I think I'll shave the beard and let my hair grow out. I'm flattered and amused. Thank you for including me in your awesome hub of National Gallery parody portraits!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Jason,

Part of the fun for me in creating my painting parodies is reading the reactions of my models after they've seen themselves in the parody. I think yours is, by far, the best reaction I've read.

Thanks for reading my Hub, commenting in it, and being one of my models. You're appearing in my 9th parody Hub. If you get a chance, please read some of the others. You might want to start with "What is a Parody?" and "Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam, Netherlands): Painting Parodies"... I'm featured in parodies in both of those Hubs.

*****

Should we now start referring to you as Jason "Bindo" Marovich?


cclitgirl profile image

cclitgirl 4 years ago from Western NC

I really do have a red hat I like to wear! This is freaking awesome!! Again, I love how you weave words with the arts, parodies with parallel stories, and you wind them together in these fantastic hubs that leave us all wanting more. Again I will say that I think you have found a niche. Run with it, and you go, girl! :)


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Cyndi (cclitgirl),

Thanks so much for reading my Hub and commenting in it. Thanks, too, my friend, for being my model for the parody of Vermeer's painting.

I agree with you about my finding a niche. It's unique. I don't have any plans to stop writing my parody Hubs.


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 4 years ago from New York

All parodies are great! You are giving us all an education in art...which is a good thing...along with the chuckles!

Voted up, funny and interesting.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mary (tillsontitan),

Thanks for reading and commenting in another of my parody Hubs. I appreciate your continued support. It appears that my degree in Fine Arts and my certification to teach art in Kindergarten through the 12th grade is finally paying off.

Education...teaching...doesn't have to be carried out in a traditional classroom in a building called a "school." I hope my painting parody Hubs and my geography Hubs and quizzes help illustrate that point.


ChristyWrites profile image

ChristyWrites 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

Oh my goodness! I just doubled over laughing and can't wait to share this one! I particularly like the bonnet on my head :) Thanks for the mention Daisy, this series is so creative hon!


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Christy,

I'm glad you're enjoying my painting parody series. Thanks for serving as my model in the "Mrs. Richard Yates" parody. Your beautiful smile is a vast improvement over the look on Mrs. Yates' face.


ChristyWrites profile image

ChristyWrites 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

Hehe Daisy, there you have me smiling all over again! Thanks hon xx


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

Hi Daisy, these get better and better! lol! I love these, and I also learn about the original paintings too, they are great aren't they? I particularly like Vermeers Girl in the Red Hat, mind you, your pictures are better! lol! wonderful stuff!


Docmo profile image

Docmo 4 years ago from UK

Daisy- I think you've fond your 'trademark' series and ins some little way I am glad I did that girl with the pearl earring parody. This series is absolutely ace, you bring history, facts, arts appreciation and a bit of fun to the whole proceedings. Well done, my dear. this is freakin' awesome.


kelleyward 4 years ago

How funny Daisy. This was great. Still laughing. Voted up and shared, Kelley


Tracy Lynn Conway profile image

Tracy Lynn Conway 4 years ago from Virginia, USA

Humor, art, history all mixed up in fun and unique way, how great! I was especially interested in the history of art in the U.S.

Tracy


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nell (Queen Elizabeth I),

Thanks for reading another of my painting parody Hubs and adding your comment. This is my 9th parody Hub. With every one I've published, I've tried to do something a little bit different. I want the articles to be similar, recognizable as being part of a series, but not carbon copies of each other.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Mohan (Docmo),

Thank you for finally realizing that if it wasn't for you, I would never have created my painting parody series and would not have fallen into this fantastic publishing niche (trademark series).

People have been creating parodies of famous paintings for hundreds of years. One of the most often used paintings for the creation of parodies is Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa. I wrote a hub about Mona Lisa and presented several examples of parodies. At the very last minute prior to publishing my article, almost as an afterthought, I created Sunshine Mona Lisa.

My Hub wasn't about my painting parodies. It was about parodies of Mona Lisa that other people had created.

You surprised me with a gift I shall always treasure...you created Daisy Mariposa with a Pearl Earring, a parody of Jan Vermeer's Girl with a Pearl Earring. You're a polymath, an expert in many fields. You did such a terrific job with the parody, I wanted everyone to see it. That's why I published the Hub "What is a Parody?"

When I published the Hub, the thought of writing a series of parody articles hadn't crossed my mind. It was the success of "What is a Parody?" that gave me the impetus to write other painting parody Hubs.

If you hadn't created the Vermeer parody for me, Mohan, I wouldn't have published any parody Hubs after Mona Lisa. Thank you, my very good friend.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Kelley,

It's nice to "see" you again. Thank you for reading and commenting in my Hub. If you've read any of the other comments. you will know that this is my 9th painting parody Hub. I hope you'll have an opportunity to read some of the others.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Tracy,

Thanks for reading and commenting in my Hub. I'm glad you enjoyed my article.

American paintings of the 18th and 19th centuries are not especially popular, even in our own country. I hope that I was successful in presenting the reasons why,


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 4 years ago

Good start to this hub on why artists go to museums. I would like to visit this partiular one some day. I laughed out loud at this posting of hubber parody!


Vellur profile image

Vellur 4 years ago from Dubai

Great hub. National Gallery sounds awesome. Enjoyed the parody, informative and interesting. Voted up.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Dianna (teaches12345),

Thanks for reading and commenting in my article. I appreciate your continued support.

I'm glad you liked the opening paragraphs of my Hub. I guess I was wearing my art teacher hat when I wrote them.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Nithya (Vellur),

Thanks for reading and commenting in another of my Hubs. I'm glad you're finding my painting parody Hubs and my art history Hubs to be informative.


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

Daisy.....These are so damned good and so much fun. You should receive an award of some kind for most orignal/unique Hub-Series-Idea!!! DID YOU HEAR ME HUBPAGES MODERATORS???


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Paula (fpherj48),

Thanks for reading and commenting in another of my painting parody Hubs. I appreciate your continued support.

Shouting at the HubPages moderators isn't going to do you any good, I'm afraid. What one of my readers did was vote for my Hub "Royalty: Painting Parodies" in the Hubbie awards voting as the Most Beautiful Hub.


Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

Gypsy Rose Lee 4 years ago from Riga, Latvia

Voted up and interesting. Loved the pics and info. Passing this on.


Daisy Mariposa profile image

Daisy Mariposa 4 years ago from Orange County (Southern California) Author

Rasma (Gypsy Rose Lee),

It's nice to "see" you again. Thanks for reading my Hub and commenting in it. Thanks, too, for sharing my article. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

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