Canon 1100D / Rebel T3 Camera Review With Photos.

Canon 1100D / Rebel T3 Camera with two kit lenses
Canon 1100D / Rebel T3 Camera with two kit lenses | Source

Let The Photos Do The Talking

There are plenty of reviews about the Canon 1100D / Rebel T3 camera out there but very few actually show examples of the beautiful photos this entry-level camera can take, which leads me to wonder if most of the individuals who wrote those reviews have actually ever used this camera or if they're just going by what others have said about it.

I actually own a Canon 1100D (also known as the Canon Rebel T3 in other parts of the world) and the two kit lenses that can be purchased with it, the Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS lens and the EF-S 55-250mm IS lens, and in this article I share some of the pictures I have taken with it so you can make a more informed decision about whether or not this camera is right for you.


My Personal Opinion Of The Canon 1100D / Rebel T3

I've owned this camera since November 2011. It's my first DSLR camera, upgrading from a point and shoot digital, and as DSLRs were quite foreign to me I wanted an entry-level one.

As a first time DSLR camera owner I've been very happy with this camera. Its controls are intuitive and the menu is easy to navigate. It feels good to hold and all of the buttons are on the right hand side, which suits me fine seeing as I'm right-handed.

Lenses are easy to mount and remove.

It comes with some great software including RAW editing software which allows you to convert your RAW format photos to TIF and JPEG format.

There is a basic user's manual, which is a quick reference guide but there is also a very in-depth manual on one of the CDs that tells you loads about the camera's features, I printed mine out and punched holes in it and it sits in a folder for quick and easy access. There are over 200 pages of instructions for users who are ready to step away from 'automatic' shooting mode and take control of their camera's settings.

Some handy features include: built-in noise reduction, flash brightness control, exposure compensation, exposure bracketing, manual and automatic focus options, scene presets that you can adjust to suit your needs, three different kinds of auto-focusing (focusing on still subjects, focusing on still subjects that are likely to move, focusing on already moving subjects), there is a 2 second and 10 second timer mode, dust spot delete feature, flash sync and much more.

The battery life is AMAZING!! I recently did a four hour modeling shoot, using the flash for at least half an hour and the live view screen for just about the whole shoot and the battery still had plenty of life left in it at the end. I did make sure to turn off the camera when I wasn't firing off any shots so maybe that made a difference. But I've done several long shoots and the battery has never died me once. Just make sure to charge it fully before you set off on a shoot.

Many people complain about the low 2.5fps rate, but remember that this is only an entry-level camera. If you want a camera that offers a higher frame rate per second, you're going to have to pay a fair bit more and invest in at least a semi-pro camera. One thing that is important is that you use a CLASS 10 SDHC card because your camera's processor will be able to write data to it much faster. This is important when using the 'continuous shooting' option. The camera can handle around 6 seconds of continuous shooting before it pauses to write data to the card. This can take a few seconds even with a CLASS 10 card, but takes a lot longer on anything slower than a CLASS 10. You could also invest in a CLASS 20 card to see if it cuts down those write times even further. I haven't bought one yet because they're considerably more pricey than CLASS 10 cards and a CLASS 10 card is adequate for my photography needs.

Cons

There really isn't much that I don't like about this camera but two things that come to mind are:

1. When shooting in the sun, the live view screen is completely washed out. I use a large hat, towel or jacket to shade the camera so I can see the screen while adjusting my settings.

2. The viewfinder only covers 95% of the scene making it difficult when framing needs to be precise. For this reason I tend to rely on my live view screen as it shows 100% of the scene. There are times of course when using the live view screen isn't an option and I just have to accept that the framing is going to have to suffer, so usually I just end up doing some cropping with the Canon editing software. Because I shoot in RAW format this doesn't usually lead to much image quality loss.


Overall I'm very happy with this camera. It's great value for money and it's come down considerably in price since I bought mine. The kit lenses that came with mine do a good enough job for beginner DSLR users, so good in fact that I've been able to sell some of my photos through stock agencies. Look for the link to one of my stock photography portfolios at the bottom of this page.

Photos Taken With The Canon EF-S 18-55mm 1:3.5-5.6 IS II Zoom Lens

First I will share photos that I took with the Canon EF-S 18-55mm 1:3.5-5.6 IS II Zoom Lens. Overall I have been very pleased with the quality of the photos taken with this cheap kit lens. It's definitely my favorite of the two lenses.

Note: You can buy the camera by itself or with either one or both IS kit lenses.

Low-light photography with the EF-S 18-55mm 1:3.5-5.6 IS II Zoom Lens

f/11.0, 57s, IS0 400, 18mm, tripod
f/11.0, 57s, IS0 400, 18mm, tripod | Source
Above: f/3.5, 1.0s, ISO 200, 18mm, tripod
Above: f/3.5, 1.0s, ISO 200, 18mm, tripod | Source
f/11.0, 1/2s, ISO 800, 36mm, hand held
f/11.0, 1/2s, ISO 800, 36mm, hand held | Source
33mm, f/4.5 (widest aperture at this focal length), ISO 6400, 1/200s, hand-held (flash not permitted)
33mm, f/4.5 (widest aperture at this focal length), ISO 6400, 1/200s, hand-held (flash not permitted) | Source

Buy The Canon Remote Switch RS60 E3

Landscape And Sunset Photos Taken With The Canon EF-S 18-55mm 1:3.5-5.6 IS II zoom lens

f/9.0, 1/250s, ISO 100, 18mm hand-held
f/9.0, 1/250s, ISO 100, 18mm hand-held | Source
f/9.0, 1/250s, ISO 100, 18mm hand-held
f/9.0, 1/250s, ISO 100, 18mm hand-held | Source
f/9.0, 1/125s, ISO 100, 29mm, hand-held
f/9.0, 1/125s, ISO 100, 29mm, hand-held | Source
f/9.0, 1/30s, ISO 100, 49mm, hand-held
f/9.0, 1/30s, ISO 100, 49mm, hand-held | Source
f/9.0, 1/160s, ISO 100, 48mm, hand-held
f/9.0, 1/160s, ISO 100, 48mm, hand-held | Source

Portrait Photos Taken With The Canon EF-S 18-55mm 1:3.5-5.6 zoom lens

f/5.6, 1/100s, ISO 100, 51mm, flash, hand-held
f/5.6, 1/100s, ISO 100, 51mm, flash, hand-held | Source
f/5.6, 1/200s, ISO 400, 53mm, flash, hand-held
f/5.6, 1/200s, ISO 400, 53mm, flash, hand-held | Source
f/5.0, 1/60s, ISO 100, 25mm, hand held
f/5.0, 1/60s, ISO 100, 25mm, hand held | Source
f/4.0, 1/125s, ISO 100, 24mm, hand-held
f/4.0, 1/125s, ISO 100, 24mm, hand-held | Source

Photos Taken With The Canon EF-S 55-250mm IS zoom lens

This lens doesn't produce such good photos as the shorter 18-55mm lens and you really need to use a tripod for most situations because the weight of the lens really unbalance the camera, which cause focus issues, even with the Image Stabilizer on. Bear in mind though that when using a tripod, you should turn the Image Stabilizer off. A remote trigger is also advisable in order to further reduce camera shake when using this lens.

f/5.6, 1/60s, ISO 100, 55mm, tripod, remote trigger, skin blemishes removed with Gimp software
f/5.6, 1/60s, ISO 100, 55mm, tripod, remote trigger, skin blemishes removed with Gimp software | Source
f/5.0, 1/80s, IS0 100, 109mm, tripod, remote trigger, skin blemishes removed with Gimp software
f/5.0, 1/80s, IS0 100, 109mm, tripod, remote trigger, skin blemishes removed with Gimp software | Source
f/4.0, 1.80s, ISO 100, 55mm, tripod, remote trigger, skin blemishes removed with Gimp software
f/4.0, 1.80s, ISO 100, 55mm, tripod, remote trigger, skin blemishes removed with Gimp software | Source
f/5.6, 1/100s, ISO 250, 55mm, hand-held
f/5.6, 1/100s, ISO 250, 55mm, hand-held | Source
f/5.6, 1/100s, ISO 1250, 123mm, hand-held
f/5.6, 1/100s, ISO 1250, 123mm, hand-held | Source
f/5.6, 1/250s, ISO 100, 250mm, camera resting on stable surface
f/5.6, 1/250s, ISO 100, 250mm, camera resting on stable surface | Source
f/5.0, 1/400s, ISO 100, 90mm
f/5.0, 1/400s, ISO 100, 90mm | Source
f/5.6, 1/30s, IS0 1600,  250mm, camera resting on my knee
f/5.6, 1/30s, IS0 1600, 250mm, camera resting on my knee | Source
f/9.0, 1/500s, ISO 100, 250mm, tripod
f/9.0, 1/500s, ISO 100, 250mm, tripod | Source

More instructions on using the Canon 1100D / Rebel T3

Buy The Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4.0-5.6 IS II Telephoto Zoom Lens

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Comments 4 comments

laszlojaeger profile image

laszlojaeger 3 years ago from Budapest

The image quality depends on the lens only at small ISO settings. So you can put on an L lens and image quality will be okay.

The main reason why you might not see so many good photos taken with entry level cameras is simply because of its' user base.

Usually amateurs and absolute beginners shoot with the 1100D and professionals and experienced hobbyists shoot with cameras like the 7D/5D/1D.

By the way the 18-55 IS is a really nice lens for the price. An alternative which would be a significant upgrade costs at least 5 times more.


DeBacco profile image

DeBacco 3 years ago from Louisiana

Great crystal clear photos


sleepylog profile image

sleepylog 3 years ago from Australia Author

Thank you DeBacco, I'm so glad you think so :) Thanks for reading my hub.


DeBacco profile image

DeBacco 3 years ago from Louisiana

I have a T3i and a T4i. I go on a lot of cruises and take hundreds of photos.

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