Pino Daeni – Expressing Sensuality and Romance

Known for his oil paintings of beautiful women and many book illustrations, Pino Daeni has been attracting international attention ever since he emigrated from Italy, the country where he formed as an artist, to the United States.

Life

Born on November 8th 1939 in Italy as Giuseppe Dangelico, Pino has shown from an early age his talent for drawing, and, despite his father's dislike for art, he studied at the Art Institute in Bari and Later at the Academy of Brera in Milan. The Pre-Raphaelites have been a major influence on Pino Art, and he drew much from their style in the nude paintings he did in his early years in order to perfect his skills.

Pino was already established in Milan when he visited New York in 1971 – the trip was to change his life. Impressed by the freedom and opportunities created by the United States’ art scene, he decided to leave behind his native country and relocate with his wife and two children to the United States. Soon after, his career took off.

Pino was first spotted by the Borghi Gallery, which exhibited his works in New York and Boston, generating much interest in the young artist. The romantic figures of sensual women with flowing dresses he painted in his early days attracted book publishers, and, in 1980 he was commissioned to do his first book cover. From then on, he became a household name for both publishers and writers. In total Pino was to illustrate over 3,000 books, for publishers such as Harlequin, Zebra, Dell, and Penguin USA.

Between 1980 and 2000, Pino mostly created book covers for romance writers such as Amanda Ashley and Danielle Steele. His paintings with the Italian model Fabio were particularly popular, especially among women.

In the early 1990s, feeling that working on illustrations has become too stressful, Pino left behind his work on book covers and picked up again his paintbrush. From then on Pino's Impressionist paintings of sensual women in colorful dresses have been well-received in major galleries in Arizona, South Carolina, and Long Island. Also, during this time, his popularity in the United Kingdom steadily grew.

After a long battle against cancer, Pino passed away at the age of 70 on May 25th 2010. However, his wonderful artworks still live.

Style

Warm and nostalgic, Pino's Impressionist canvasses often depict beautiful women in their boudoirs preparing to welcome their lovers with maddening caresses, or innocent children surrounded by graceful girls strolling on sunny beaches. The latter canvasses are set in the Mediterranean, where Pino grew up surrounded by his sisters and cousins.

Using tetradic color schemes, many of Pino's artworks depict sensual women lost in thought, in a colorful setting partially veiled by dark-green shadows. Many of his paintings capture a momentary expression of the model – a prevailing feature of his works that has been often praised. Softness, delicacy, and sensuality are found in all of Pino's works, and especially in paintings such as Purity, Sensuality, Serendipity, The Red Shawl, and Mediterranean Breeze.

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Comments 4 comments

Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 4 years ago from North Carolina

Nice review...haven't heard of this artist, but I also do not read romance novels. I liked the colors in the examples you used of his paintings.


Better Yourself profile image

Better Yourself 4 years ago from North Carolina Author

Thank You Denise! Glad you enjoyed the hub!


LeslieOutlaw profile image

LeslieOutlaw 3 years ago from South Carolina

Beautiful artwork, very romantic and peaceful. I can see why he's so popular. The painting at the top is especially breathtaking. Nice choices.

~Leslie


Better Yourself profile image

Better Yourself 3 years ago from North Carolina Author

Thanks Leslie, so glad you stopped by to read my hub and enjoyed the artwork! :)

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