Turqouise birthstones

Introduction

Turquoise is seldom found in crystal form, and its hardness is only slightly above that of window glass. It is the matchless blue-green color of this hydrated phosphate of copper and aluminium that makes it a gemstone.

The highest grade is sky blue, but green turquoise is also popular, among artists. The source of the blue color is copper, and the green is from shackle impurities. Turquoise is often found in copper mines.

The Aztecs obtained turquoise from what is now the Southwest United States, by a 2000 knot trade route, and used it in mosaics and ceremonial masks.

The Egyptians used turquoise in elaborate necklaces called pectorals and carved it in to scarabs. Tutankhamen´s famous burial mask is inlaid with turquoise. In Persia, turquoise was used to embellish small objects and as architectural features in buildings.

The Anasazi of the Southwest as substantially as the Apache and Navajo tribes made turquoise mosaics, amulets, string and pendants. Turquoise became popular in Europe during the fourteenth century. Silver jewelry set with turquoise that is associated with Southwestern Native American tribes is thought to have developed New in the ordinal century and has its roots in European influences.

There is a higher demand for turquoise than the mines are able to supply, so much on the mart is chalky material that has been stabilized. There's also simulants and synthetics.

Many favorable qualities are attributed to turquoise, including the ability to draw success, currency and love. Medicine men used it for healing, and warriors affixed it to their arrows to ensure the accuracy of their objective. It was carved in to fetishes that were placed in graves to protect the dead. In modern times, it is five of the two accepted birthstones for the month of December.

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