Native Folk Art: Water Décor

Demonstration of Mexican hand weaving.
Demonstration of Mexican hand weaving. | Source
Demonstration of Peruvian gourd burning. Note the burning charcoal in her right hand.
Demonstration of Peruvian gourd burning. Note the burning charcoal in her right hand. | Source
Drumming by Ghanaian drummers and anyone else who wants to.
Drumming by Ghanaian drummers and anyone else who wants to. | Source
Attendees share an outdoor tent, while eating meals bought at ethnic food booths.
Attendees share an outdoor tent, while eating meals bought at ethnic food booths. | Source

Last July a friend invited my companion and me to the International Folk Art Market held annually in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Since water is the main topic I write about, I decided to see in what ways and how often water was depicted as a theme in indigenous folk art.

Among other things, I wanted to know if artisans most often represented what they knew best, or created images of what they would like more of (working with the Law of Attraction, so to speak). What I found didn't really surprise me - people craft what they know best, seldom what they need or want more of. What is this market and why do people show there?

Santa Fe International Folk Art Market

The three day Santa Fe International Folk Art Market is the largest folk art market in the world (over 120,000 potential buyers attended the market in 2012). Pre-approved village artisans from around the world display and sell specially handcrafted wares to the U.S. public. The ambience includes native music, dance, food, and other attractions.

Each year, artisans can make more in one weekend of selling crafts at the market than they can in a year at home. They see each other's crafts and compare notes with each other - giving and receiving tips, and gathering ideas for new themes they can craft in their own, traditional way.

Fair Trade for Indigenous Crafts

Most of the 150 artisans who sold at the International Folk Art Market in 2012 were from small villages in remote parts of the world. They came to take advantage of the market's Fair Trade practices - to benefit their families and communities by showing their crafts in a place where they are not only appreciated, but also fairly compensated. All of the artwork sold was handcrafted, following native traditions and themes of the country.

Because artisans at the market take home 90% of what they sell, more than 150 communities in 54 countries were supported by U.S. buyers in 2012. Of all artisans displaying, 38 represented local cooperatives, which meant their sales alone uplifted the lives of over 200,000 extended family members in their home countries.

Artisans are initially found working in their villages by travelers (such as Peace Corps volunteers) who often end up as marketing consultants - coaching the artisans in business practices, and helping them to make the connections they need to sell their art in other countries. Each year participation grows - more than 40% of the artisans in 2012 were brand new, most coming from villages that had never participated before. To enable them to take part, fair promoters assist artisans with coaching and/or with transportation costs.

By buying their wares, Folk Art Market attendees support and extend continuation of the best of indigenous crafts worldwide, helping to increase the economic well being of other countries, and extending peace throughout the world in a much more efficient way than waging war. They also learn something about the cultures of the artisans they buy from, not just the details of the craft, but also a bit about how villagers live and what craftmaking means to that particular village.

Water Themed Indigenous Artwork

I was curious to see how many artisans chose water as a theme in their craft work. I also wanted to see whether or not the prevalence of water art reflected the amount of water existing in the country of origin. Here are some of the craft works I found that had water as a theme, arranged alphabetically by country:

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Chile used the most unique materials. This swan is made from dyed horsehair. It comes from a cooperative in Rari, Chile, which is renowned for its miniature horsehair weavings.Cuba had a lot of fabric water hangings there. This is a style of art called "Naive" that depicts everyday life of the countryside - in this case a woman boating down a river filled with fish. Cuban art typically fills up every corner of the fabric. This Naive fabric hanging, painted by a different artist than the one above (though they shared a booth), shows the ocean goddess in all her glory.France had one table display. It sold traditional village ceramic art made by a husband/wife team from the region of Burgundy, SE of Paris. This tray looked to me like a school of fish.Haiti was the other country at the market that is surrounded by ocean. This seaweed candle holder is made from recycled steel drums. Its creator is a former apprentice of the next artist.Haiti's delight in music and intimacy with the ocean are shown in this musical mermaid combination. This master artist was taught by a man who made fancy cemetery crosses from recycled metal, which started a whole new industry in Haiti.All of the art displayed by Haiti at the market was steel sculpture made from recycled steel (oil) drums. Here is a water dragon frolicking with ocean fish.India adds distinctive white dots to their stylized paintings. This fish parchment is a traditional style painted on paper, instead of the plaster walls of Bhopal, as was done prior to the 1980s.Mexico had more table displays than any other country. This fish and the surrounding pots and pitchers were made from hammered copper by a family of craftsmen in the state of Michoacan, Western Mexico.This fish panel was made in the state of Mexico (Central Mexico) by the Mazahuas - considered the poorest indigenous group in the state. They have a long handicraft tradition of making fine embroidery such as this.Mexico is also known for its brightly painted wood sculptures. Here is a wall-mounted fish that was displayed in the small museum onsite.Peruvian artisans from a village high in the Andes offered demonstrations on how to burn this beautiful gourd art (see below). The gourds are grown on the coast. This ocean turtle scene comes complete with sand and bubbles.Peru was the only country sampled that had jewelry with a water theme. This silver fish necklace is made by one of 7 sisters in the old Inca style.Uganda makes baskets with several different materials that give it the soft colors, including seaweed. This one was made by one of the 300 artisans who make up Uganda Crafts cooperative, many of whom are disabled.Vanuatu is an archipelago of 83 islands east of Australia, already losing land from global warming. It's well known for its carved slit drums made from tree trunks planted in the ground. This sea tortoise came with their first showing at the market.
Chile used the most unique materials. This swan is made from dyed horsehair. It comes from a cooperative in Rari, Chile, which is renowned for its miniature horsehair weavings.
Chile used the most unique materials. This swan is made from dyed horsehair. It comes from a cooperative in Rari, Chile, which is renowned for its miniature horsehair weavings. | Source
Cuba had a lot of fabric water hangings there. This is a style of art called "Naive" that depicts everyday life of the countryside - in this case a woman boating down a river filled with fish.
Cuba had a lot of fabric water hangings there. This is a style of art called "Naïve" that depicts everyday life of the countryside - in this case a woman boating down a river filled with fish. | Source
Cuban art typically fills up every corner of the fabric. This Naive fabric hanging, painted by a different artist than the one above (though they shared a booth), shows the ocean goddess in all her glory.
Cuban art typically fills up every corner of the fabric. This Naïve fabric hanging, painted by a different artist than the one above (though they shared a booth), shows the ocean goddess in all her glory. | Source
France had one table display. It sold traditional village ceramic art made by a husband/wife team from the region of Burgundy, SE of Paris. This tray looked to me like a school of fish.
France had one table display. It sold traditional village ceramic art made by a husband/wife team from the region of Burgundy, SE of Paris. This tray looked to me like a school of fish. | Source
Haiti was the other country at the market that is surrounded by ocean. This seaweed candle holder is made from recycled steel drums. Its creator is a former apprentice of the next artist.
Haiti was the other country at the market that is surrounded by ocean. This seaweed candle holder is made from recycled steel drums. Its creator is a former apprentice of the next artist. | Source
Haiti's delight in music and intimacy with the ocean are shown in this musical mermaid combination. This master artist was taught by a man who made fancy cemetery crosses from recycled metal, which started a whole new industry in Haiti.
Haiti's delight in music and intimacy with the ocean are shown in this musical mermaid combination. This master artist was taught by a man who made fancy cemetery crosses from recycled metal, which started a whole new industry in Haiti. | Source
All of the art displayed by Haiti at the market was steel sculpture made from recycled steel (oil) drums. Here is a water dragon frolicking with ocean fish.
All of the art displayed by Haiti at the market was steel sculpture made from recycled steel (oil) drums. Here is a water dragon frolicking with ocean fish.
India adds distinctive white dots to their stylized paintings. This fish parchment is a traditional style painted on paper, instead of the plaster walls of Bhopal, as was done prior to the 1980s.
India adds distinctive white dots to their stylized paintings. This fish parchment is a traditional style painted on paper, instead of the plaster walls of Bhopal, as was done prior to the 1980s. | Source
Mexico had more table displays than any other country. This fish and the surrounding pots and pitchers were made from hammered copper by a family of craftsmen in the state of Michoacan, Western Mexico.
Mexico had more table displays than any other country. This fish and the surrounding pots and pitchers were made from hammered copper by a family of craftsmen in the state of Michoacan, Western Mexico. | Source
This fish panel was made in the state of Mexico (Central Mexico) by the Mazahuas - considered the poorest indigenous group in the state. They have a long handicraft tradition of making fine embroidery such as this.
This fish panel was made in the state of Mexico (Central Mexico) by the Mazahuas - considered the poorest indigenous group in the state. They have a long handicraft tradition of making fine embroidery such as this. | Source
Mexico is also known for its brightly painted wood sculptures. Here is a wall-mounted fish that was displayed in the small museum onsite.
Mexico is also known for its brightly painted wood sculptures. Here is a wall-mounted fish that was displayed in the small museum onsite. | Source
Peruvian artisans from a village high in the Andes offered demonstrations on how to burn this beautiful gourd art (see below). The gourds are grown on the coast. This ocean turtle scene comes complete with sand and bubbles.
Peruvian artisans from a village high in the Andes offered demonstrations on how to burn this beautiful gourd art (see below). The gourds are grown on the coast. This ocean turtle scene comes complete with sand and bubbles. | Source
Peru was the only country sampled that had jewelry with a water theme. This silver fish necklace is made by one of 7 sisters in the old Inca style.
Peru was the only country sampled that had jewelry with a water theme. This silverfish necklace is made by one of 7 sisters in the old Inca style. | Source
Uganda makes baskets with several different materials that give it the soft colors, including seaweed. This one was made by one of the 300 artisans who make up Uganda Crafts cooperative, many of whom are disabled.
Uganda makes baskets with several different materials that give it the soft colors, including seaweed. This one was made by one of the 300 artisans who make up Uganda Crafts cooperative, many of whom are disabled. | Source
Vanuatu is an archipelago of 83 islands east of Australia, already losing land from global warming. It's well known for its carved slit drums made from tree trunks planted in the ground. This sea tortoise came with their first showing at the market.
Vanuatu is an archipelago of 83 islands east of Australia, already losing land from global warming. It's well known for its carved slit drums made from tree trunks planted in the ground. This sea tortoise came with their first showing at the market. | Source

There were a total of 133 table displays from 54 countries. Those with the largest number of booths were: Mexico (23), India (13), Uzbekistan (14), Peru (10).

show route and directions
A markerHaiti -
Haiti
[get directions]

Country sharing an island in the Caribbean with the Dominican Republic - highly vulnerable to hurricanes and floods.

B markerCuba -
Cuba
[get directions]

Island in the middle of the Caribbean with whom the U.S. has struggled politically.

C markerMexico -
Mexico
[get directions]

Other than Native American, most of the indigenous art in the US Southwest comes from Mexico.

Our hostess bought a fish-themed candle holder made in Haiti from recycled steel drums.
Our hostess bought a fish-themed candle holder made in Haiti from recycled steel drums. | Source

Water Countries with Art Displays

There were only three countries at the market that depicted water as a major theme in their works: Mexico, Cuba, and Haiti. Haiti and Cuba are islands surrounded by ocean; Mexico is a large country with two large coastlines east and west, both of which generate a fair amount of income from tourism.

All three countries could be considered water rich, when compared to most of the other countries represented at the market. Their artwork showed not just a rich history with water, but also an almost cultural identification with water, as though without it they would not be the same country or people. Haitian art included music with sea creatures, Cuban art included the water goddess and her creatures, and Mexico depicted the importance of water using many different art materials and styles.

Art and the Law of Attraction

Most of the 54 countries represented at the folk art market have some kind of water body in their country, yet most are considered by others (and sometimes themselves) to be water poor. The Law of Attraction states that bringing attention to what you appreciate can help bring more of it. It seems to me that if crafters were to use their artwork to build on the beauty of whatever water they do have, they could help their countrypeople start seeing possibilities for new ways of creating or redistributing the water supply, so all could share.

For example, Zimbabwe is considered a water poor country. But Victoria Falls, the deepest waterfall in the world and one of the three widest, lies on its western border, while the Zambezi River that flows from it forms the northern border. There are rivers running all through Zimbabwe, just not enough for agricultural production, western style.

If Zimbabwean artisans were to start showing or symbolizing the beauty and abundance of their country's rivers and falls in their art, could that change the perceptions of their government and people enough to attract greater (availability of) supply, even to the point of enhancing the hydrologic cycle there? Could this be an additional way, then, that artisans could bring benefit to their home countries?

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Comments 11 comments

leahlefler profile image

leahlefler 4 years ago from Western New York

I love the artwork shown here - the Peruvian gourd art is spectacular! I am glad there is a Fair Trade organization in Santa Fe, so that the artists are properly compensated for their amazing work. Beautiful hub, Watergeek!


Robert Erich profile image

Robert Erich 4 years ago from California

Great pictures and incredibly creative idea - looking for art with the specific focus of water. Well written and great information.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

That was a very interesting hub! Well done! Someday I want to go to the Santa Fe Festival....it always looked like a cool place to be. :)


watergeek profile image

watergeek 4 years ago Author

New Mexico is such a quiet state that you don't realize how radical it really is. The International Folk Art Market brings together indigenous peoples from all over the world, providing them with an income they've earned, the respect and honor they deserve, and interactions with 120,000 people who represent the real heart of the US.


lindacee profile image

lindacee 4 years ago from Southern Arizona

Santa Fe is one of my favorite cities. I have not been to that particular festival, but hope to attend someday. Your ingeniously-focused Hub was a treat to read. I was very impressed with the Chilean horsehair weaving -- quite a skill to create miniature works of art from woven horsehair. What a wonderful opportunity for these artisans to share their crafts and knowledge outside their native countries. Impressive event.


watergeek profile image

watergeek 4 years ago Author

Thank you for your compliments all. I just received word from the Folk Art Market's administrative office that I missed an item. They sent me a photo of a beautiful wood sea turtle carving, which I added by permission of the tourism office of Vanuatu (former New Hebrides).


Om Paramapoonya profile image

Om Paramapoonya 4 years ago

Wow, the Santa Fe Folk Art Market sounds like a really awesome place. Thanks for sharing these lovely photos of water-themed artwork, watergeek. My favorite is probably the Peruvian gourd art. I love turtles!


watergeek profile image

watergeek 4 years ago Author

That was mine too, Om. It was really interesting watching them burn the patterns too. Thanks for reading.


krsharp05 profile image

krsharp05 4 years ago from 18th and Vine

The art is stunning. A couple of pottery pieces reminded me of my trip to Mexico. I literally got off the plane and was being handed large clay things. My dad was laughing of course, and I didn't know what to do. Bless his heart, he bought them. They now grace his book shelves. This is a really creative take on your area of expertise. Nicely done! Awesome & Up. -K


watergeek profile image

watergeek 4 years ago Author

Thanks Kristie. I can totally see you being bombarded in Mexico with people wanting you to buy. Some of what they sell is mediocre, but every once in a while you get something really good. However, how is a kid supposed to know how to tell? (Were you a kid then?) ;-)


Kristen Howe profile image

Kristen Howe 19 months ago from Northeast Ohio

Watergeek, this was just beautiful from the detailed descriptions to the photos. Voted up!

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