Why Do Artists Create?

Why do we do it?


As a writer and artist, I frequently deal with the frustrations associated with making the visions inside my head real. Writing poetry or fiction or creating a new oil painting often presents setbacks and disappointments that makes what I do sometimes seem (to be blunt) not worth the effort. Extensive reworking of a piece is part of the game, but when repeated efforts continually fail to satisfy me, discouragement can set in.

It is also disappointing to achieve something artistically, only to find it is not received as I might hope. Everyone wants their labors to be appreciated, but when one’s efforts are met with indifference or actual derision, it can be disappointing to say the least. An impoverished Vincent Van Gogh sold only one painting in his lifetime, and it has been reported that after his death, his paintings were actually used as targets for shooting practice. Clearly, his work was not received as he might have wished when he was alive; despite a talent and vision that posthumously ranks him among the greatest artists of all time.

There are many reasons artists push through their frustrations and disappointments to create, but why do we do it? What do artists want? I am capable of speaking only for myself, but I believe I can offer some generalizations that encompass the feelings of other creators, as well.




More about art and artists from Amazon.com

We push ourselves to create, despite the obstacles

Why do artists create?  What are we looking for?
Why do artists create? What are we looking for?
Creativity does not require destitution and misery
Creativity does not require destitution and misery
An artist's vision of the world might be unique, but artists are not lunatics, dreaming their lives away
An artist's vision of the world might be unique, but artists are not lunatics, dreaming their lives away
Give an artist a little acceptance and recognition, and something magical will happen
Give an artist a little acceptance and recognition, and something magical will happen
Artists take great risks by expressing themselves in very personal ways
Artists take great risks by expressing themselves in very personal ways

What do artists really want?


Artists are people. The woman behind you in the check-out line at the grocery store might be an artist. The waiter in your local restaurant might be, also. This may come as a surprise to those who view all creators as lunatics or unmotivated slackers dreaming their lives away, but it’s true—artists are just like everyone else. We have families, lives and interests beyond our work. We need the same things everyone else needs to succeed, and we seek the same things in life, although perhaps in different ways. Give us a little love and nurturing and we can create beautiful things. Because we are people—ordinary men and women like everyone else—we hope that when we create we will find these things:


1. Shared Communication: Artists communicate very precisely, although sometimes in obscure ways. We might beat you over the head with the message, or we might leave clues to our intent that we desperately hope you notice and understand. We use words and images to communicate our thoughts and feelings, and unless our intent becomes known and understood, we have failed in our work—at least on one level. Make no mistake—even if our intent is extremely difficult to understand, we desperately hope you will comprehend our message.

2. Acceptance: This should not be surprising to anyone who recognizes that we are plain, ordinary people. Everyone wants to be accepted, but artists often show themselves to the world in a very personal, intimate way. Because of this, we perhaps look for acceptance more than a bank teller or restaurateur. If you accept what we do, it inspires us to push through the difficult moments and continue. If you appreciate our efforts, others will, also. (Acceptance might take the form of compensation for our work, but that is certainly not all we are searching for.)

3. Recognition: This does not mean all artists and writers want fame and acclaim but, like everyone else, we want to be acknowledged for being good at what we do. Our craft is not easy, even if we make it look as if it is. When we spend all day or night painting or drawing or writing a song or poem, we are working hard. We would also like for others to see and understand that what we do is meaningful. We add beauty to the world around us with our efforts.

4. Respect: Because our work is so personal, we hope you will demonstrate respect for what we do, even if you don’t like it. Your view isn’t necessarily the prevailing opinion, and others might find worth in what you do not. It injures us when you mock or ridicule our work, because many of us cannot separate ourselves from our craft. We can take criticism if it remains constructive, but criticism without purpose is shallow and empty.

5. Positive Contributions to Society. Work is part of an upward trend in the universe—mankind’s collective efforts to improve the environment through its labors. Artists want their work to be valued as part of this upward trend. Artists use their talents to create beauty and make the world better, and the contributions of writers, musicians, painters and actors are not only significant, they are lasting. Creative people change the world with their talents.



Spread the love


Artists are not creative only when they are thoroughly miserable. Living a life of destitution and suffering from the rejection of the public is not a creative requisite. We do not rely on alcoholism and drugs to escape from the misery of our lives and/or refine our creative vision. The truth is that artists are far more productive when our efforts are appreciated and validated by society. Creativity thrives on support. Picasso was a visual artist who achieved sufficient popularity that he commanded a substantial income from the art market. Subsequently, as he became more successful, his unique brand of creativity flourished.

If you communicate with us and recognize, accept and respect us, I think you will love us, as well. People want to be moved and inspired by books or paintings or songs, and I believe they want artists to produce truthful, quality work. This can best be achieved in an atmosphere of respect and (yes, that’s right) love.

We all share our opinions about movies and books, recommending what we like to family and friends. Take it a few steps further. When you see a drawing or painting you like, or when you read a poem that strikes an emotional chord inside you—tell someone. Recommend the artist’s work to a friend and spread the love. Help the artist gain a modicum of acceptance and recognition. By doing this, you will be doing the world a favor.



Comments 86 comments

Heart Felt Book profile image

Heart Felt Book 5 years ago from New York, NY

awesome! very useful and I totally agree.. Thanks for sharing !!


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Thank you, Heart Felt! I appreciate your stopping by and sharing the artistic love a little.

Mike


Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

Enjoyed reading this Mike but.....Do you not think that this can be applied to just about everyone? We all want recognition no matter who we are and what we do.For instance as a mother I want to hear that I am a good mother and want recognition and respect just as I do as an artist. I always try to look at both sides of every situation.


saddlerider1 profile image

saddlerider1 5 years ago

To answer Just Ask Susan, yes I truly believe that all humans want acceptance, recognition and admiration for being who we are and what we offer to the world, our spouses, children, peers, colleagues, family etc etc.

However I have found artists in particular very sensitive, emotional and in many cases reclusive. Almost protective of who and what we are. I admire anyone be it an artist or otherwise who can be expressive and sincere about what they are giving back to society in many forms.

I am an artist of word and at one time of painting with oils but now my painting is mainly of words. I know that I want acceptance not rejection, I want admiration not disdain, I want to be recognized as an artist, not for fame or money but simply appreciated. When I am neither of these, I become reclusive and many times will go hide in my cave of life and not come out for awhile.

Some may call it mood swings, I don't really know, but I know that I am affected by members of society who I feel may be rejecting me at various levels. So having said all this, you can probably feel my insecurity as an artist, simply by what I have just written. But alas, that is ME and I thrive on trying to be understood.

Thanks Mike you expressed your artistry very well, enjoy life and keep being who you are, an artist in an insecure world. Peace and hugs amigo


Poohgranma profile image

Poohgranma 5 years ago from On the edge

I'll take constructive criticism over silence any day of the week. I despise voids and fill them maybe haphazardly when ever I discover one. Silence equals disapproval to me (old baggage no doubt).

As for reworking a piece, I'll be happy if I ever reach a point where my reworking doesn't destroy the original intent. How we struggle over one word, one sentence when the overall piece is good. But then, it's those single lines that often attract a reader to becoming a follower who gives you yet another chance to prove your worth.

Very interesting and though provoking write, Mike, as usual.


waynet profile image

waynet 5 years ago from Hull City United Kingdom

Artists always have that spark that makes them create stuff, because every new drawing or work of art could be the next best thing in personal terms or a much wider success, such as the release of an art book or other well recieved artwork.

Although I do know what you mean. getting discouraged because of one drawing or whatever that doesn't turn out the way that you want can create a roadblock of creativity at times and I hate it when that roadblock lasts a long time.

It's like since I joined here at Hubpages nearly 4 years ago I had planned to release a few graphic novels, but as time went on doubt set in as to will it be good enough and all that and I suppose that's why I've held off doing them, but I'm quietly working on them still and you could say that it will mark at least 10 years of my life in total when I do actually release my books to the world, as I first thought about these when things were going not too good on the job front back then....

Great hubpage!


fucsia profile image

fucsia 5 years ago

I admire the work of artists. They know express the feelings, the emotions, the thoughts, while I often feel that my deeper part remains inside of me. Also with the words I am not always able to express myself: sometimes they seem too poor, too trivial.

I like your Hub, I am agree with you. I love the art, I am not expert but, as just writing, I love when the core of a person takes form in something palpable, visible, listenable. Through the art I breathe the life, so the artists deserve respect, also for their courage.


Genna East profile image

Genna East 5 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

First of all, I must say that I was not aware of the target practice of Van Gogh’s work…unbelievable.

This is an excellent hub, and very well-written. I have always thought that artists create because they (we) have to. I can’t imagine not creating. Appreciation is wonderful, and I agree that we are more productive when valued. But I value constructive criticism as well. (Emphasis on “constructive.”)


poetvix profile image

poetvix 5 years ago from Gone from Texas but still in the south. Surrounded by God's country.

Your comments about Van Gogh, for me, bring up images of the countless vastly talented people that go through this life unnoticed, totally unknown. The best musician I ever heard was in a garage and to this day has yet to play outside said garage.

Thanks for pointing out that the act of creation truly is work and one can become very personally invested.

Awesome hub!


Life Unplugged 5 years ago

That was amazing read , as far as my experiece goes ,you have covered almost all key aspects which drives artist to create art ,but another crucial aspect is kind of money an art can fetch ,so materialistic aspect related to art cannot be ignored,

Thanks for sharing article


Pollyannalana profile image

Pollyannalana 5 years ago from US

Hope to not go against any rules but I came across this today at hubpages and you may enjoy it too http://hubpages.com/hub/My-Drawings-im-not-a-show-... The boy is just 14. My husband is a musician/songwriter and can play almost any instrument from sound. My son and daughter have gifts drawing, nothing alike so I was happy to discover quite by accident a few years ago I can sketch faces, neither of my kids can do that and I would have to have classes to really do anything with and it is not a desire although I am pleased. I have found something I love though and I think that is most important, to do something that comes from you and you can hardly believe it is you. Do you get those?


R.Cochran profile image

R.Cochran 5 years ago from Dahlonega, GA

Mike, that was a very insightful read into your thought process. I read the other comments and must say something that many may not want to hear.

Praise for your work is great, but that's not what it is suppose to be about. It is your love of what you do. If you feel like you need recognition and praise to continue, then quit now.

I write songs, that no ones ever heard, but I love doing it. I write poetry because it vents my soul, not for the accolades or the approval of others.

When I'm dead and gone and one of them becomes recognized as something great, will it really matter?

As long as your enjoy what you do, when you are doing it then you should continue. If not, don't.


SilentReed profile image

SilentReed 5 years ago from Philippines

In "The Fountainhead" by Ayn Rand, the main character Howard Roark is an architect who would rather struggle in obscurity than compromise his artistic and individual integrity in exchange for fame and fortune.To create a work of art solely for art's sake without thought for anything else is of course an idealization that is misleading.The reasons you mention are the reality of why most artists create.But I have to agree also with the comment of R.Cochran above.


Roger 5 years ago

Mike, I think the reason creators create is purely because they must; they have no choice. One can stop and swear they will never try again, but, they will always return to do it again and again. For me, I consider the ability to create a blessing, but, also a curse. If I could remove this from myself I would do it, but then, I would be sorry for the rest of my life because I would cease to be me. We all want recognition, success, and we want our work to be appreciated, however, on a rare occasion, we actually please our self and that is the magical moment that really counts for much more than any outside force can bestow upon us. I think the bottom line is, readers, viewers, or listeners, all have opinions, but, the creator is the one who knows.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Hi, Susan. Your question is a good one, and it was at least in part my point--artists want to be seen as good at what the do, just as a parent would want to be known as a good parent. Artists are regular people--ordinary men and women who happen to do something that is often misunderstood. They nature of creativity leaves artists open to derision and oppression. Perhaps my article sounded like I was whining or complaining, but it was not intended as such. It was simply meant to express that a little love and acceptance is helpful--and, it is something we all need.

Thanks for reading, I am always glad you have stopped by.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Saddlerider, thanks very much for your comments. You expressed what is in the mind and heart and soul of many a creator with your usual eloquence. We are a sensitive and often insecure group, and I have also been known to withdraw for a time when the hits begin to hurt a little too much.

I thank you for your understanding, and for sharing your considerable wisdom here. Take care, my friend.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Poohgranma, I agree with you. I will also take constructive criticism over silence. I confess I would prefer silence to mockery or derision without any attempt to be constructive. We put our heart and soul out there for the world to see, and sometimes the criticisms serve no purpose. I am all for any criticism that is offered constructively.

Your comments about reworking a piece were very insightful. It's true that in the reworking, our work is sometimes transformed into something different--something unintended and often unforeseen. That is part of the beauty and the frustration of creating. It's sometimes difficult to LET work transform into something other than was originally intended.

The chance to prove our worth--that's all we can ask, isn't it? Thanks so much for your thoughts and insights.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Wayne, thanks for stopping by. It is always a pleasure to have your take on issues in the art world.

Sometimes it seems the roadblocks are many--you crash through one, detour around another, and still another blocks your path.

I remember reading comments from you about the graphic novels and wondered how you were progressing. I hope your goals remain in sight--I'm looking forward to someday seeing the finished product.

Thanks again for the comments, insights and support.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Fucsia, thanks for reading. You have aptly described in your comments both the joys and the fears of creating: it is a true joy when something we create truly comes alive and evolves into something the outside world can see and know and interact with. Likewise, often our efforts seem trivial or inadequate. These are the moments when we could use the support of others around us. These are when we need people who believe in what we are doing. When we have that in our lives, it helps us push through our fears and show ourselves to the world.

Thanks again for your comments. Take care.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Hi, Genna. Using Van Gogh's work for target practice is astonishing, isn't it? When I first read this, I was floored. Even if someone couldn't see what talent Van Gogh had, the callous disregard for his efforts is totally disheartening. That was, of course, part of my point in writing this.

I agree with you--I am not opposed to constructive criticism, so long as "constructive" remains in the equation. Take care.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Poetvix, you have summarized my thoughts so very well with the example of your musician-friend. He (she?) plays in solitude because the music speaks to his soul, but if the scenario shifted only slightly, the world might enjoy this person's talent. That is how it should be--we all benefit when one's creativity is shared.

Thanks for reading.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Life Unplugged, you have raised an interesting point. It is certainly true that the financial aspects of creating cannot and should not be ignored. We are more apt to find fuel for our creativity when we are comfortable and secure, despite ideas to the contrary. it is also a fact that when art sells, the artist gains an acceptance and following that just doesn't occur otherwise. When someone pays money for art, others suddenly become interested.

Thanks for your insights.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Hi, Polly. Yes, I get those moments, too. Sometimes I will do something and it just seems so right, and I step back and say, "Whoa! Did I just do that?" That's when creating is fun and truly exciting. Those are the moments when you know you're doing this for all the right reasons.....

It sounds like your entire family is talented, and it must be fun to see creativity in such diverse forms. It also must have been satisfying for you to find a "niche" for yourself.

I will check out the hub you have linked here after answering the remaining comments. Thanks, Polly1

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

R. Cochran, thanks for your comments. I do in fact agree with what you are saying--praise should never be the reason one creates. I have been an artist for many decades, and praise (or the lack thereof) has never been a motivating factor. My article emphasized the need for support more than praise, and I would suggest that we all need it. Praise is a form of support, but hardly the only form. I would also suggest that if praise is genuine and heartfelt, there should be no reason to withhold it. It is akin to withholding love--what would the point really be?

I do enjoy what I do, even if my article intimated that perhaps I do not. I was probably responding on some level to an incident of mockery and derision that occurred recently and for seemingly no purpose. When faced with mindless cruelty, yes--what we do becomes a little less enjoyable.

In summation, I do see where you're coming from with your comments, and I am essentially in agreement. I do believe support (in the form of praise or something else) is helpful, however.

Thanks again, I appreciate your comments and insights.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

SilentReed, thanks for stopping by. Art for art's sake is a fascinating concept, and I have given considerable thought throughout most of my adult life as to why creators do what we do. The idea of striving for an artistic ideal and refusing to compromise along the way is probably a part of the reason everyone creates, even if we do eventually compromise that perfect artistic vision. It takes a unique personality and a singular vision for that to be enough, however. Other factors do tend to matter--at least most of the time.

As I commented above, I agree with R. Cochran that praise should not be a motivating force, but would reiterate that if said praise is genuine and heartfelt, why withhold it?

Thanks again for stopping by. Take care.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Roger, your terrific comments are greatly appreciated. You're absolutely right, being a creator is a blessing and a curse. We might wish for a different path, but we would indeed miss it if creativity were not a part of our lives. You have summed it all up magnificently.

We do create to please ourselves, but I also believe we hope someone else will see the world the way we do, and that they will like and understand what we do.

Thanks so much for your comments.

Mike


drbj profile image

drbj 5 years ago from south Florida

Hi, Mike. In my view, artists, whether writers, painters, sculptors, actors, etc., create because they enjoy creating. Some for the pleasure they themselves receive; some for the pleasure they receive from the admiration or recognition by others. And some for all of the above.

Thanks for your interesting and meaningful examination of the topic.


daouady profile image

daouady 5 years ago from Northeast Ohio

Mike,

For all the reasons you mentioned I opted to do custom art so that the subject matter has an emotional connection when the oil painting is completed.

Just last Christmas a friend commissioned me to do an oil painting of her parents. She reported that her 80+ parents were all in tears which moved the rest of the family to tear. It was grand feeling to know that me as an artist has the power to move people to tears.

It is hard work, frustration, and lonely at times but I create so I can hear the "oohhs" and the "ahhs". This is what keeps me going but I agree, It is hard work and to be very honest, there had been times that I wish I did not learn this craft.

Great hub. Thank you for making me realize that I am not the only one that struggles with these issues.


coffeesnob 5 years ago

Mike, this is so true and profound. I create to communicate. When my heart is full and ready to burst I have to do something - it is usually writing, but it can be a simple creating an atmosphere condisive to communication. We do take a chance because artists surely give of themselves and allow people to see inside. bless you for this! it was a beautiful addition to me day. Rated up and awesome!

CS


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 5 years ago from Wales

Hi Mike,

Interesting read and thanks for sharing.

I press all the buttons on this one.

Take care,

Eiddwen.


McHamlet profile image

McHamlet 5 years ago

Very nicely put Mike. I have had so many debates with myself on the nature of art and why I have pushed myself at times to try to produce it and at other times why I have lacked the motivation to do so. I think you've summed it up excellently here and I'm right behind you on the conclusion. Spread the love. We all need more of it.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Drbj, thanks for stopping by. Creating for the enjoyment of it is what it is truly all about. If you enjoy it, the frustrations and distractions seem less severe.

Thanks again. As always, your comments are greatly appreciated.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Daouady, thanks for sharing your story. The joy you brought to your friend's family is special, and a big reason why creators SHOULD create. It is a great moment when our work brings such joy to someone else.

Thanks again. Your words are an inspiration.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

CS, thanks for your insights. Communication is a huge part of the creative process, and even if the message is obscured, I think we all hope to be understood.

It is always a pleasure to see you here, and I hope you are doing well.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Eiddwen, thanks for reading and for your support. I appreciate it a great deal.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

McHamlet, thanks for your kind words. I am happy to find you in agreement that a little support and love should not be withheld. I think we get locked into a mindset that we are swimming upstream against a sea of negativity, and this is supported by the mistaken belief that suffering is a part of the creative process. There is no reason why we shouldn't all spread the love a little bit. I'm glad you agree. Take care.

Mike


BrightMeadow profile image

BrightMeadow 5 years ago from a room of one's own

Hi Mike,

Such a well written piece. Thank you for writing it. The discussion it has generated has been very stimulating. I like the statement "Artists communicate very precisely, although in very obscure ways." I couldn't think of a better way of saying that. I was also very affected by your insight that what we do is personal. I had never really thought about it before, but the more I think about it, the more I realize how much it is true: what we do is personal. As an artist of any sort we create work that, in some way, shares our view of the world. I agree that art has the ability impact society (and the world) in positive ways. Human beings are the only creatures who progress through learning, knowledge, communication, etc and I think that art contributes to that progression.

I think that art can be produced whether one is miserable as well as when one is being appreciated: one's personal state may be transmitted in the work one creates--again, communication-- although I do understand that having support makes it easier to do anything no matter how passionate one is about it.

I agree with Susan that we all want recognition. I think that is a human trait.

I can see R. Cochran's point that art should not be done for the sake of money or prestige-- I agree that it should not be created solely for those reasons-- but as art -- for me anyway-- is a form of communication, it seems the effort would be wasted if it was never shared. Even if it is not widely recieved with praise, chances are good that there are people who would still recieve, and even appreciate, that communication.


Christopher Price profile image

Christopher Price 5 years ago from Vermont, USA

Mike-

All the reasons you list are valid


Pollyannalana 5 years ago

I agree with saddlerider, and even though my worst is here now saving my best for my site I still hate when I do put here what I think is so beautiful and it is simple overlooked. I only have been writing poetry about a year and it almost possesses me and I can never wait to see what my fingers have to say if it is something from my heart I feel strongly about.

Sorry I haven't seen you in awhile Mike. Hope you will check my site. Sending out my first book next week, although a children's book it is for adults too who I think will fall in love with the characters..but anyway then I will be on to a romance I have had done awhile, time to see if my mind is worth dime. lol.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Brightmeadow, thanks for your remarks. i am in agreement, our art does reflect our view of the world. Acceptance of our art validates not only our work, but our personal vision. This is why it can be hurtful when our efforts are mocked or rejected casually.

One can certainly be creative and productive when miserable, and sometimes the misery that spurs us to create can be transformed into something poignant and beautiful. I think if that is all that fuels our creativity, however, we quickly flame out.

Well, thanks again for your comments and insights.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Thanks, Christopher--and thanks for stopping by.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Hi, Polly. Yeah, I've needed a break from HubPages for awhile--a couple things happen to sour me on the HP experience, and I have also been working insane hours lately, including a 32 hour day (not week--32 hours in a row) recently.

I will look for your web site, and congratulations on your book. You deserve all the success that comes your way.

Mike


Rebecca E. profile image

Rebecca E. 5 years ago from Canada

Mike I admire your work and value you as an artist, a wordsmiith, and a greathub writer thanks so much.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Thank you, Rebecca. I appreciate the kind words very much. Take care.

Mike


Susan Ann Langford 5 years ago

Hello Mike..I enjoyed reading this story for the simple fact that you shared an honest and clear view of what the "Artist" feels. I call that the human condition.

Thanks for writing and remaining true to who you are Mike. Also, you might want to check out my new book: Bringing Down Goliath: Based on a True Story. http://www.bn.com (hardcover)


schoolgirlforreal profile image

schoolgirlforreal 5 years ago from USA

Hi Mike!

As an artist, I like to create quickly most of the time. Like when I write poetry , as emotions wash over me, I write what I feel , quickly (easily). Same with painting though I think I'm def less good at that....I guess I can get discourged too at times, I'm not always quick, I do put work in.

As I was reading an article about EdgarAllenPoe by kashmir56 yesterday, I noticed how some talents weren't recognized till after their death as you mentioned above so it's just nice to know we are special as in we prob do great work, we just may not know it or be appreciated! Keep on hubbing, you're one of my favs!


kimberlyslyrics 5 years ago

Mike, I think Rebecca said it perfectly

great creation right here!

xo

kimberly


AEvans profile image

AEvans 5 years ago from SomeWhere Out There

Validation is the key for every successful artist. I enjoy your work and often read although not commenting when I was going through my tough time. I am feeling better now and time is healing an open wound. Thank you so much for all of your support. I am slowly coming back. :)


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 5 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

Thanks for the cheerleading Mike, artists need it, and a good entrance to the market as Picasso attained. Many of us only need a bit to get by or get started, thanks for introducing people to the needs of artists, and for directing people away from the stereotype.

Peace

Ben Zoltak


jpcmc profile image

jpcmc 5 years ago from Quezon CIty, Phlippines

Interesting point of views. Come to think of it, many people want the same but express themselves in a different way.


rorshak sobchak 5 years ago

Great hub I really enjoyed it.

rorshak sobchak


BeccaHubbardWoods profile image

BeccaHubbardWoods 5 years ago from Outside your window...

i never tire of reading your work. i just hate that i've been so behind!!! :D


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

I haven't found time to respond to comments in a long while, but I have continued reading. Thanks to everyone for their kind words and heartfelt responses. Even though it has been months, I still wish to respond in kind to everyone who left a comment here. So, here goes...


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Susan Langford: I will certainly check out your new book, and I appreciate your gracious appraisal of my writing. Thanks.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Schoolgirl, I know you are like many others who create quickly and in response to whatever emotions are currently being felt. It is a powerful way to create, and the end result may be raw but it is pure and beautiful. I hope you always continue to write and draw.

Mike


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Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Kim, thanks for stopping by. I am always grateful for your comments.

Mike


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Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

AEvans, thanks for stopping by. It's good to see you back here, reading and writing. You were definitely missed during your time away.

Mike


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Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Ben (Zoltak), as always you have summed it all up in a concise and accurate way. Support for what we do never hurts, and it also helps for "us art guys" to stick together. Thanks, my friend.

Mike


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Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

jpcmc, thanks for reading. You got it exactly--we all need a little support and nurturing sometimes, no matter what we do or how we feel about it. People need this, not just artists and in this respect, we are all the same.

Mike


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Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Rorshak Sobchak, thanks for reading. I appreciate your kind words. Take care.

Mike


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Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Becca, it's so nice to find you here. We have missed you and your work, but I understand--I have literally been away for months. I thank you for stopping by--your comments are always gracious and much appreciated. Take care.

Mike


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Cheeky Girl 5 years ago from UK and Nerujenia

Hy Mike! This is a great hub about Art. I love everything to do with Art. You make some great points about how Art has a purpose for us all. When we grow up with Art, we seem to appreciate it and understand it more. This is great, voting up!


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Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Thank you, Cheeky Girl. Art is an important part of life on so many levels, and it contributes to what I like to call an "upward trend". Art makes the world better, and the appreciation of art and artists is an important aspect of its creation. Thanks again.

Mike


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DonDWest 5 years ago from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Good article Mike,

It’s time for a moment of dissent. I'm what many would call an artist, and I hate being an artist. I would rather be anything but an artist. I consider myself cursed that I have the natural skills and aptitudes of an artist. Artists are simply not respected in Westernized society. The work is long, hard, difficult, and so UNPROFITABLE.

Mark my words, if the Lord came down from the heavens and offered me the opportunity to exchange my art aptitudes for that of a scientist, a mathematician, or a business person, I would take it in a heart beat, no questions asked.

What makes a successful person in Western society today is the cold, calculating, and cunning type. I've tried to be that many times, fighting my artistic nature, but alas, perhaps the only thing harder in the life of the artist than getting your work recognized is getting the artist out of you when you no longer desire it.

Love it or hate it, there's no escape in being an artist. I create until the point of exhaustion and frustration. I create in defiance of all logic. I can't leave myself alone without creating. You could lock me in a room with a paper clip, and I would come up with a million ways to bend the paper clip because I can. And I hate it, I hate it, just hate it!

Being an artist is like taking care of a child. Maybe the child is annoying, loud, irrational, and illogical, etc; but you can't stop being the nurturing parent. I just can't bring myself to stop doing art. No matter how hard I attempt to persevere, I can't turn myself into an accountant, or a scientist, or a dental hygienist.

Being an artist is torture; I would not wish this on my greatest enemies. Words of advice to the young, if you have two talents, one is art and one is another, please pursue the other. If you're a talented artist and struggle to find something else you can do at the equivalent talent level, God help you!


Famous Artists 5 years ago

Thanks for the great info. This really sheds light on the art industry as a whole.


kimberlyslyrics 4 years ago

Hi Mike my good friend, honestly this might not only be one of my favourite hubs of yours but for me personally identified and classified into words what I have not been able to and have been most frustrated. Mike I want to do anything creative, good or bad it's the creative process for me, that thrill when ideas come from no where and we start communicating in mediums I for one have not before and we learn, share, give people hope, exchange brilliance, support another artist knowing exactly their thinking and motives their self doubt and pride ever so seldom.

Sorry but booked marked and voted up and sideways and on my blog, ok maybe sent to grandma in mail too

hugs galore you amazing artist.

kimberly aka messenger


kimberlyslyrics 4 years ago

ps and yes mike i know I was here before

just identifying tremendously right now as to why I am creating in areas coming from no where

now get back and create or i'll tell grandma!


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Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

DonDWest, thank you for your comments. Your insights into the life of an artist are tremendously valuable, and I appreciate them a great deal--even if your point saddens me on some levels.

I agree that it is tremendously difficult to succeed as an artist, and I was in fact responding to some of the negativity surrounding the struggles an artist endures. It saddens me to realize that anyone with an ability that makes them stand out would prefer not to have it, but I understand what you are saying. Sometimes it can indeed seem more like a curse than a gift.

I hope you will push onward and continue to offer the world your gifts, even if that same world does not understand or appreciate what you are giving it. And, I am tremendously appreciative of your unique comments and insights offered here. Thank you very much.

Mike


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Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Famous Artists, I appreciate your stopping by and reading. Thank you very much.

Mike


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Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Kim, thanks for stopping by--and for your kind words. You have offered exactly what was needed when I wrote this piece--support and understanding. Your comments are so true and I relate to them--you make me want to create something new. Thanks.

Mike


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Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Thanks for coming back, Kim. It is nice to know my words can impact you as much as yours affect me. Come back any time, okay?

Mike


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lpanfil 4 years ago from Cleveland, Ohio

I think the most prevalent theme in the lives or artists and writers is – Am I good enough? When someone buys their work they feel, if only for a fleeting moment – yes I am good enough.


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Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Ipanfil, you are correct--when art is purchased, its creator does feel accepted and worthy, even if only for the moment. This is important on so many levels--not just the obvious financial impact.

Thanks for your comments, and through your words--your support.

Mike


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cabmgmnt 4 years ago from Northfield, MA

Great passion is described in this hub. As an artist I can relate to everything you said. I feel validated when someone comments on my work and frustrated when someone looks down on me for being an artist because their assumptions about the life I lead are misguided. Thanks for the support.


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Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Cabmgmnt, thanks for reading and offering your comments. It is always a joy and pleasure to connect with someone of like mind, and we seem on the same wavelength here. I appreciate your comments a great deal, and I thank you in kind for your support.

Mike


josh 4 years ago

i dont agree!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


josh 4 years ago

MMMMMMMMMMMMIIIIIIIIIIIIKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


kimberlyslyrics 4 years ago

Mmmmmmmmmmmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiikiiiieeeeeeeeee!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


josh 4 years ago

why you hatin


josh 4 years ago

hey kimberly what gives you the right to talk like that


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Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Josh, I am uncertain exactly what you didn't agree with, but I will accept the fact that no one will agree with everything I have to say. I appreciate your stopping by.

Mike


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Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

KKKKKKKKKKKKIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMMMMMMMMMMM!

Kim, it is always a delight to find that you have visited my pages. I hope for the days when I am back here more frequently and able to interact with you more often. How you doing these days?

Mike


josh 4 years ago

how much do you get paid mike?


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Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

It depends on the job, Josh. I don't come cheap, though.

Mike


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Vanderleelie 4 years ago from New Brunswick, Canada

You have dispelled many of the misconceptions that people have about artists and their motivation. I would also say that artists continue to do their work because they love the process as much as the end result. Making is often as significant to the artist as the mark that's left behind. A very thought-provoking hub!


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Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Vanderleelie, thanks for your comments. I agree completely, for many artists the process is as important as the end result. I believe this is tied into an innate desire humans have to be productive--artists feel this as acutely as anyone else. I will admit that I enjoy the artistic journey--that first color of paint on a canvas, the adjustment of an idea or technique along the way, etc. It is fun, especially when it is going well. And, as you suggest, it is a very valid motivation.

Thanks again for your insights. Take care.

Mike

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