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Can you invest in ART or is it purely for JOY?

  1. irenev17 profile image60
    irenev17posted 7 years ago

    Is it right to buy ART just for a one rason only, to resell it and profit?

    1. XTASIS profile image62
      XTASISposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Why not ?  If that's your / his / her business ?..

    2. RKHenry profile image79
      RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Absolutely, I totally agree with Ralwus.

      Why do YOU think most artist paint?  To live in poverty?  Better yet, for the love of it?  Think again.  My mom is an art broker, so I have a little insight into the art collecting world.  Artist get hard-ons when their stuff is sold at auction, and especially when someone thinks it is worthy enough to keep as an investment.

      1. awsydney profile image61
        awsydneyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        RK, she is merely seeking opinions from different people, she is not saying it should be one way or another. I feel the same way as you do. smile

        1. RKHenry profile image79
          RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Dude, that's cool.  What did I say that was so bad?  What?  I was just trying to find out her opinion.  I'm really interested to know.

    3. spiritactor profile image61
      spiritactorposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Hmm-- the answer COULD be as complex as "Does art EXIST for only one reason?".

      And yet, as "selling" could be considered a form of "sharing", the monetary payment for the act of finding/procuring it could be simple re-numeration. A condition for that, in my opinion, is your own belief in the art piece. If a "seller" has mastered to a certain degree crucial points of recognizing what makes art beautiful in a universal sense-- that is a very valuable expertise. A buyer could also be re-numerating the seller for that expertise. In that case, I see no "wrong" in the pure intent of selling art for profit.

    4. Ben Zoltak profile image79
      Ben Zoltakposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      You can buy art for any reason. In a dialouge I had with some fellow oil painters many years ago, I recall us talking about how someone could buy your art and burn it right in front of you. It would hurt some, but many artists would be fine with it, as long as the cash paid for the art isn't as counterfeit as the vulgarity of destroying good art.

      Feel free to buy my art, I know it will be a good investment, at least in lowering our blood pressure!

    5. Rod Marsden profile image79
      Rod Marsdenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      If you don't spend the time knowing it, understanding it and loving it you are likely to come a cropper.

      Yes, you can buy art for any reason and good luck to you. Just do your research first.


  2. profile image0
    ralwusposted 7 years ago

    Of course, if one can afford to. That's one man's opinion.

  3. irenev17 profile image60
    irenev17posted 7 years ago

    I would think, correct me if I wrong, I'm not an artist I'm a bussinesswoman, actually I need to hear this from an Artist, would you like people to ENJOY your work instead of selling it just as a commodity?

    1. profile image0
      ryankettposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Somebody somewhere will enjoy it. You are effectively an agent or broker, if you can give the artist decent cash for his work.... and somebody somewhere is attractive to the painting as a result of your marketing, then there are 3 winners. Some artists will believe that they can make more money selling directly to the end user - whilst others will prefer to shift units asap and move on to the next job.

      The worlds most famous paintings have agents all over them, trying to arrange deals, national galleries all over the world compete for the newly discovered picasso's etc, why shouldnt it be the same at the lower end, and middle end, of the market?

  4. irenev17 profile image60
    irenev17posted 7 years ago

    I would think, correct me if I wrong, I'm not an artist I'm a bussinesswoman, actually I need to hear this from an Artist, would you like people to ENJOY your work instead of selling it just as a commodity?

    1. awsydney profile image61
      awsydneyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      IreneV17, Many a great artist have died a pauper. Some mediocre ones have prosper.

      I like to paint and I buy art pieces first and foremost because I enjoy looking at them. If they happen to be works of important artists, that is a bonus. This is similar to wine, you buy it to drink. However, there is also absolutely nothing wrong if one were to buy art or wine purely for speculative reasons.

      I'm also a businessman and if I say to you that you are a beautiful and charming woman, who has the right to tell me I'm wrong??

    2. jiberish profile image78
      jiberishposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I consider myself an artist, and both would be nice.

      1. awsydney profile image61
        awsydneyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I have been playing the piano for a very long time. I used to have a tip bowl on the piano when I was earning some extra cash in college. No objections to any big tips, monetary or otherwise smile

        1. RKHenry profile image79
          RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          I love a good piano bar.

          Any artist out there who has a worthy talent should be rewarded. Whether that comes in the from of a specific fan base, monetary means, works being collected- anything.  Art is worth celebrating.  It brings out life.

          1. awsydney profile image61
            awsydneyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Yeah, it paid the rent when I was in college. We would not have Piano Man from Billy Joel if it wasn't for that tip bowl during his early days. What a legend!

  5. profile image0
    ralwusposted 7 years ago

    I have sold many of my own paintings so it would not bother me. I will not sell my nudes though.

  6. irenev17 profile image60
    irenev17posted 7 years ago

    Wow, lot of responses. Thank you everyone.

    I agree with most.
    Seems like Art is both an enjoyable thing as well as a commodity to a lot of people.

    One of the reasons I wanted these opinions was to see if our pilot program would be of interest.

    a stock exchange for all areas of the Independent Arts.
    what do you think, will it work?

    1. awsydney profile image61
      awsydneyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      The success of a stock exchange is measured by tangible means. Art on the other hand, is more subjective, just like how you have the right to disagree to my earlier claim that you are a beautiful woman.

  7. irenev17 profile image60
    irenev17posted 7 years ago

    i think art is BOTH a tangible and an investment.

    also, it opens many doors for a broader range of artistic expression in all areas of art -especially the Independent Arts.
    not just music, but film, literature, photography, canvas, sculpture, metalwork, etc.

    imagine ordinary people all over the world supporting the art form both ways.not only a sound investment but an extraordinary opportunity for everyone on so many levels.

  8. profile image59
    Jane Taxpayerposted 7 years ago

    Absolutely. If Art didn't have the ability to appreciate in value, then not oo many people would buy it in the first place. The artis is not just in it for fun... he needs to eat too.

    Besides, "Artisan" is a skilled trade. They should be able to make something out of it.

  9. thranax profile image50
    thranaxposted 7 years ago

    Investing in art can be a tricky business. Some people invest stupidly or really hit a jackpot. Remember, art can grow and change any day, whats famous and great today can become worthless tomorrow due to the fact of what people like and don't like. Also art has invisible boundaries when it comes to marketing, sometimes a piece would only appeal to a girl, sometimes a male, sometimes a child and other times an old person. It is almost imposable to judge that yourself if your not an artist and don't know what your market likes!

    ~thranax~

  10. Dink96 profile image59
    Dink96posted 7 years ago

    Great question and wonderful discourse here on your subject!  I have always fantasized to be rich enough to purchase great art, but on a far simpler scale, I have learned that anyone can purchase and enjoy art.  Buy what you enjoy; what speaks to you personally.  It has been my experience that in order for me to purchase art, I have to have that "connection" with the piece.  Anytime you buy art from a living, working artist, you are supporting the arts.  My only rule of thumb is to buy what I love; simply must have.  Otherwise, it's a waste of money.  We have twice yearly art walks in my community and I always put aside some $$ so that I can do some shopping w/ the criteria mentioned above. 

    As soon as I'm in the bracket to buy AND sell art for profit, I'll get back to you!

  11. irenev17 profile image60
    irenev17posted 7 years ago

    thank you for the compliments, comments.

    agreed that most art costs a lot and definitely should be bought because of that connection.

    hence the reason for scent of indie ( soi360.com )

    not only can a person invest now {{ on a lower scale $ }} but as the art/artist grows, the person grows as well. thus both the fan and artist benefit by expression, connection and worth.

    -it is often the smallest group of 'might be' that become the largest voice of 'are'.

  12. wrenfrost56 profile image82
    wrenfrost56posted 7 years ago

    Sure I don't see why not, art is a commodity. smile

 
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