jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (12 posts)

How much would you pay for children's art classes?

  1. DebtFreedom profile image79
    DebtFreedomposted 6 years ago

    Just wondering how much you would be willing to pay for your child's art classes - and say the cost included supplies. What reasons might you be willing to pay more? Also, for the amount you say you are willing to pay, how long do you expect each class to be and how many classes? Please be reasonable. lol Thanks.

    1. Polly C profile image88
      Polly Cposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Ummm, about £4 - £5 for an hour? How many dollars is that - about $7/8? That's supposing it was a class full of others, not a private lesson.

  2. basaltbezel profile image75
    basaltbezelposted 6 years ago

    I think it would definitely depend on a lot of things, including but not limited to:

    -Number of children.
    -Age of children (5 year olds are a bigger handful than 12 year olds.)
    -Level - whether you're teaching a 'fun' class, beginner, intermediate or something for kids who've shown a talent in that area.
    -Your own qualifications. If, for instance, you have a teaching qualification or are a well known artist you could probably charge more.

  3. Joy56 profile image60
    Joy56posted 6 years ago

    i take craft classes, i am not an artist, so i could not teach art.

    I charge very little because mums i know just cannot afford to pay a lot.  I think being creative in childhood is a wonderful thing.  The girls love the glitter, glue, and scissors.

    Now if i was sending my child to art classes,and the child showed an interest and wanted to learn, i would be willing to pay, quite a lot, as i believe it is better for them to get good tuition, and maybe private lessons here in Ireland, would be anything from 40 euro an hour.

  4. DebtFreedom profile image79
    DebtFreedomposted 6 years ago

    Polly C: $7/8 per hour seems reasonable.

    I'm planning on 1.5 hr classes for kids serious in art. And, a 1 hour class for kids wanting to try it out.

    basaltbezel: While I may be qualified, and/or an artist, I don't really know how to say that to the parents. I suppose on a website for the classes. But, even putting my "qualifications" seems weird to me. Maybe I'm being shy. I guess I can put on works I've done.

    Joy56: I'm hoping to target kids who's parents see potential in them. Where I live there are a lot of craft classes and art classes for adults. So, I thought I might try and teach art to kids. I'm not interested in private lessons though.

    A few problems I've found are: a place to rent is really expensive, the cost of supplies is high, and I don't really know if there is a market for it.

  5. Rose Mari profile image81
    Rose Mariposted 6 years ago

    "A few problems I've found are: a place to rent is really expensive, the cost of supplies is high, and I don't really know if there is a market for it."

    A few ideas for you - consider holding the classes at a community center, church, or school where you could rent a room (some allow you to use them for free) for the time period of the class itself. This will allow you to get a feel for the amount of interest in your classes. You have a built in target market.

    Community colleges or Junior colleges often have art classes for kids. Discover if you can sign up to teach one of them.

    Approach day care and after school centers about teaching art classes in conjunction with their services.

    Plan for a Summer Camp schedule. Start investigating where you could hold a summer art "camp". Sometimes afterschool activities can be too much, and something like an art camp works better with some peoples schedules. Maybe a Christmas Art Camp for the upcoming season?

    1. DebtFreedom profile image79
      DebtFreedomposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Rose Mari, thanks for some really great ideas. I've been thinking about doing some camps. I think you are right about questioning whether there really is a market for it or not. It's hard to tell where I live. I would like to do a Christmas Art camp..

      Do you have your own art classes? You seem to know a lot.

    2. livewithrichard profile image86
      livewithrichardposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      All great ideas. I'd also consider establishing yourself as a nonprofit so you can accept donations and get discounts unavailable to for-profits. 

      If this is going to be your full time employment then you need to take all of your expected expenses into account.  Marketing and promoting yourself is a big part of that so local craft fairs would be a good place to show off your talents and offer your services.

      How many kids and how many classes per week will suffice to pay all the bills and also your salary?  You need a business plan before you move forward.

  6. lrohner profile image86
    lrohnerposted 6 years ago

    My daughter did take art classes when she was in middle school. (She's now 23.) I think back then I was paying $10 to $15 per class. Classes met weekly and were about an hour each--maybe a little bit more. And there were usually around 4 or 5 other kids in the class at the same time.

  7. Bizziebee profile image75
    Bizziebeeposted 6 years ago

    If you can get a group of people from your community together you may be able to get a group discount

  8. Rose Mari profile image81
    Rose Mariposted 6 years ago

    Don't over-complicate things. Keep it simple.

    If you are going to hold a camp, I would have specific art activities or projects that will be completed. (This also enables you to know the cost of supplies before advertising your camp, which means that you won't lose money on it!)

    The camp is just an intro, it is kind of a trial period kind of thing. A way for the parents and the kids (and you!) to try the art classes out. Then if they want to get more into learning a specific technique or craft, you can introduce the idea of small group classes or individual classes on an ongoing basis.

    I've not held my own art classes, but I have run my own small business.

    If you do not get a lot of interest in the first camp, do not give up if it is something you want to do. Just don't lose money on the deal, and the more established you become in the community, the more business you will receive.

    Small towns (I don't know if you are in a small town or not) are notorious for being difficult to establish new businesses. Usually, by the time the town has accepted you and is ready to give you their business, you have run out of start up capital and have to close your doors.

    That is why I think it is best for you to keep your overhead low, don't commit to renting, and keep a good handle on your supply costs. You don't have too much risk if you approach it this way.

  9. 61
    stoneyyposted 5 years ago

    Possible locations; local art/craft store.  Local museum or public library.