How to Buy a Used Car: Cut Spending

How to Buy a Used Car: Cut Spending

Cut spending on a used car! There's a reason people ask, "Would you buy a used car from him?" Used car salespeople are notoriously difficult, unscrupulous people, or at least that's their reputation. Regardless of whether the reputation is deserved or not, buying a used car can be difficult. This site will help you navigate the shark-infested waters of used car buying.

How to Buy a Used Car: Cut Spending

How to Buy a Used Car: Cut Spending

  • Unless your local dealer is offering enticing offers, avoid dealers. They sell for full retail. You should be purchasing for wholesale. Look in your local newspaper or on the Internet, but be careful and avoid Craigslist and Ebay scams.
  • Check the bluebook before purchasing. You can determine the value of a used vehicle by consulting internet sources. In addition, libraries, banks, and credit unions often have resources that can help you assess the value of a potential purchase.
  • Always have a trusted mechanic look at the car before purchasing it.
  • Run a Carfax report on any vehicle you are thinking about purchasing. A Carfax report may give pertinent information, about the car, that you’ll want to know before you even consider purchasing it.
  • If you are meeting a private party, try to get there early. You may find the owner preparing the car, by spraying it with water or starting it in advance, for your examination. A wet car looks deceivingly better, and a car that has been warmed up in advance seems to run better.
  • Try to get the seller to set a time for you to see the car after it has been idle overnight. You want to see how it will start first thing in the morning.
  • Always try to inspect the car during the day. You’d be surprised about how many people purchase a car at night and then regret it in the morning. The night conceals flaws, blemishes, and damage.
  • Don't rush the inspection or let yourself be rushed. If the seller doesn’t have time to show the car thoroughly, move on to a new car, or set an another appointment to view the car.
  • Drive the car at about 20 to 30 miles per hour. Open a window and listen. The car shouldn’t pull to either side, and you should only hear the sound of the tires on the road. Additional noise should be an alarm, because it could indicate brake, engine, or transmission trouble.
  • Check the local newspaper, used car lots, the Internet, and other sources for prices. Remember that car lots are notoriously the most expensive place to purchase a used car, but sometimes deals can be found there too.
  • Use the MSN used car checklist to thoroughly examine your car. This comprehensive checklist is a must.

Do you have any advice for purchasing a used car?

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