Lumber rack buying tips for Toyota Tacoma (2005-2012)

 

Lumber racks for new Toyota Tacomas must be specific

A lot of contractors, whether it's your own business or working for a larger company, depend on good lumber racks for their trucks. For some, their truck is completely useless without it. But the newer Toyota Tacoma, if that happens to be your truck of choice, has a very unique bed that really isn't designed for the use of a lumber rack. What is it about a 2005 to current year Tacoma that is so unique? The entire bed, believe it or not, is plastic. Think of the bed on these trucks as being like a really thick bedliner. The whole bed is actually a plastic/composite insert, so you can't install just any rack on these trucks, for obvious reasons. This poses a dilemma to anyone who buys one of these trucks and plans to use it for contract-type work. Simply bolting any rack to the bed will not work, I repeat, DO NOT just bolt a rack to the bed of these trucks, you're just waiting for an accident to happen and then the inevitable lawsuit. Of course some contractors use their trucks for work and recreation, which is why they end up buying a truck like a Tacoma in the first place, so what do you do?

Well, there is hope and a couple of manufacturers have actually designed specific racks for these trucks, although when the new Tacoma first hit the market, there was nothing available. Just to remind anyone reading this, I used to sell truck accessories so I remember new Tacoma owners being very upset to find out racks were not only not available, but initially there was a good chance nothing would ever become available given the unique nature of the bed. Fortunately, Toyota trucks are very popular (Tacomas are built in California), so taking on the design challenge for a good rack was worth it for manufacturers.

Rack-it lumber racks

This is a stack of Rack-it brand standard lumber racks. They are one-piece welded racks with a removable rear bar.
This is a stack of Rack-it brand standard lumber racks. They are one-piece welded racks with a removable rear bar.

Rack-it racks

These racks, which are predominantly available on the west coast, and some Midwest states, are arguably the best you can get and they came up with a good design to meet the new Tacoma challenge. I will include pictures here, but unfortunately I don't have pictures of the actual rack installed to give a complete view of how it works. Rack-it makes great racks, but their marketing sucks so most of their pictures are old.

Rack-it racks are all one-piece welded, series 40 steel and black powder coated-although I have never believed these racks are truly powder coated because the finish seems to chip too easily in my opinion. What they did different in their design was to make small bracket-like extrusions on the side rails where a long arm bolts on which then extends down to the bottom of the bed where the actual body bolt is removed and used as the central mounting point. (See pictures.) This allows the rack to use the support of the frame-can't go wrong there, where normally racks are simply bolted to the bed rails. This is done at two points in the front of the bed-one on each side. Toward the rear, they use a similar technique, but actually use the only metal in the bed, which are two pillars that you will notice behind the rear taillights. Ok, so the entire bed isn't plastic, but essentially most of it is. To mount this part of the rack, you will have to pop the taillight housings out-don't worry, it's not nearly as complicated as it sounds. The end result is a very sturdy rack that will allow full use of the truck's load capacity. Rack-it racks are also one of the only racks specific to these trucks that I know of which extend out over the cab (even for the double cabs, but they cost more). The standard Rack-it racks (called the 1000 series) for Tacomas cost about $650. I'm not sure, but I don't think they make a forklift loadable rack, and I know they don't make a camper shell rack-which is a rack that would allow for a shell to be installed on the bed as it literally wraps around the shell.

The other thing to remember about these special racks is they generally don't interfere with tool boxes. Because that arm in the front is angled (see the pictures), a low-profile toolbox should be able to mount without the arm being in the way. I know that Weatherguard makes a box that will fit and there is a Dee Zee brand box as well. If your accessory dealer says no box will fit, just ask to actually set a box in the bed, they may be surprised that they do in fact fit.

If your local dealer does not have these racks available, I know Rack-it will ship a bolt-together version of the rack. It's not the same as the welded version obviously, but you can still get one. I apologize for readers on the east coast since I have never lived there and do not know if there are some good local brands that are only available there. I would love to hear about more since in the truck accessory business, there tends to be some really great products that most people never know about because they aren't available everywhere.

Rack-it brackets and mounting hardware

The long arm on the right bolts down on the bed once the body bolt is removed. The other bracket is used toward the rear of the bed.
The long arm on the right bolts down on the bed once the body bolt is removed. The other bracket is used toward the rear of the bed.
This is the rear of the rack, notice the extruded part where most of these racks are normally just straight angle iron.
This is the rear of the rack, notice the extruded part where most of these racks are normally just straight angle iron.
This is the body bolt in the bed toward the front that has to be removed.
This is the body bolt in the bed toward the front that has to be removed.
This is the back of the bed where the other bracket is mounted. You'll notice that this is the only part of the bed that is actually sheet metal.
This is the back of the bed where the other bracket is mounted. You'll notice that this is the only part of the bed that is actually sheet metal.

Thule racks

I know these racks are typically for recreation use, but that doesn't mean they can't be used for light loads of lumber and or ladders. There are two basic versions, one is called the Xsporter and you will need a special adapter kit for the Tacoma (2005-08). This rack clamps on, and the height can be adjusted. There is no extension out over the cab, and they can only hold about 450lbs. The other rack they offer is very similar, called their professional version (it looks the same), which requires the same adapter kit, but it is not adjustable and it can carry about 700 lbs. I believe that both are made out of aluminum, so they won't rust. Either one of these racks will cost almost $600 but they should be available just about anywhere in the US-even in sporting goods stores. For all of you made in the USA fanatics out there (I'm one of them) -remember that despite Thule saying they are a Swedish company, most of their stuff you see on the shelves was made here in the US. Oh, and Yakima, their stuff is made in Mexico and the company is supposedly owned by a middle eastern-based bank, which is why I didn't even mention them here. It's too bad because I like Yakima's racks, and a lot of their old designs are still good, but the company just isn't what it used to be, and most of their engineers went to work for Thule anyway.

Trac Rac

A similar rack to Thule's is called the Trac Rac-which they say is ‘removable', but it is no more removable than Thule's rack, it simply means that it is clamped on. Ok, so it may be a little easier to remove than the Thule rack, but lets face it, if you use a rack a lot, how often are you removing it? These racks in my opinion are too expensive, which is why I won't go into too many details about them. I think they offer an option for the extension out over the cab as an add-on, which only bumps the price up even more. You have to price the rails and the rack, which together is about $800. You're paying for the aluminum and the whole removable feature, but like I said, how many truck owners that need a rack would really use that?

Don't trust the truck dealer

The new Tacomas are great trucks, and it I don't think Toyota has any plans on discontinuing the use of the plastic/composite bed, so if you're considering buying one of these trucks and you need a lumber rack, keep this information in mind. Don't listen to the truck dealer, no offense but they usually have no clue when it comes to accessories. Especially with the Tacoma, these dealers will tell the customer how great it is that they don't have to buy a plastic bedliner or shell out more cash for a spray-in liner, but fail to mention how it affects the installation of certain accessories. It always pays to check the prices between what the dealer sells the accessories for and what the aftermarket dealer sells them for-sometimes they are the same stuff, just branded different. Of course the truck dealer will almost always have the higher price. And when it comes to accessories like lumber racks and tool boxes, most salespeople at truck dealers won't have a clue, and try to sell you crap products.

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Comments 7 comments

jim bauerlein 7 years ago

thanks for the tip, am on east coast and will look around.


Ed George 6 years ago

Hi Jim

I have an '08 Tacoma, Standard cab. What if I put a shell on it and put a rack on the shell? There are a number of them out there that claim 250 lbs


Tom Zizzo profile image

Tom Zizzo 6 years ago from Santa Clara, CA Author

Just want to comment to Jim-Yakima and Thule rate any roof rack-and I mean ANY roof rack at only 165lbs-pretty much a standard rating. Now, on a shell, it sort of depends on the rack and the roof of the shell. Snugtop shells have a nice thick honeycomb roof-much thicker than a Leer or ARE, etc. You can even get their commercial type with a contractor rack on it rated at 500lbs-which they make the fiberglass even thicker. Or, you could get a top like a Workmaster or Tradesman-totally commercial top, with a nice heavy duty rack on it that at the least would be good for about 500 lbs. Hope this helps, and feel free to ask any more questions.


Ruben 6 years ago

can someone tell me where i can find a lumber rack for a 2008 tacoma, In San Diego


Tom Zizzo profile image

Tom Zizzo 6 years ago from Santa Clara, CA Author

@Ruben You should be able to find a Rack-It dealer in San Diego, call them at: 800-445-7666. If you don't want a Rack-It rack, you should be able to find a nice Thule rack that can support up to about 500lbs-but it does not cantilever out over the cab at just about any REI store or bike shop. Hope this helps.


Keith 2 years ago

I'm looking for a lumber rack for my Toyota prerunner it's a 2002 4door.


Tom Zizzo profile image

Tom Zizzo 2 years ago from Santa Clara, CA Author

@Keith -if you want a full lumber rack, I recommend the Rack-It rack. Having the four door though-they have the smaller bed-means the rack will have the extra rail support in the front part of the bed. This is necessary because the over hang (cantilever) is longer than it would be if the bed were longer. That truck also does not have the composite bed like the newer Tacomas do, so you can put just about anything on there. Try to avoid a bolt together rack, they are not as strong as fully welded racks.

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