Should there be an upper age limit for drivers?

This is a subject that is a bit controversial, especially if you are an elderly person yourself, but I feel it is an important one to ask. Should there be an upper age limit for driving?

I am asking this question because as an experienced and formerly professional driver, I notice that once people get into a certain age group, i.e. the senior citizen age range, their driving seems to deteriorate considerably as the years go on. If you live in the UK you will particularly notice this as you approach towns such as Eastbourne that are largely populated by retired individuals looking to spend their final years by the seaside. The pace of driving slows to a crawl that is way below the speed limit, causing frustration to those behind them who only ask that the flow of traffic meets the legal speed limits, as opposed to exceeding them.

What has prompted me to write this article is the fact that My Mother and Stepfather both fall firmly into this 'driving deteriorating' category, and especially in my Mother's case, although she stubbornly refuses to admit there is anything wrong with her driving, even though it is patently obvious to anyone who has been in a car with her as many times as I have over the years, that there has been a noticeable downturn in her driving standards.

My Mother's Driving

When I was growing up my Mother was a very competent driver, completely comfortable with motorways on our annual visits to the UK mainland, and able to park a car as well as any man. She was often complimented on her driving skills by family and friends, and during my younger years I only ever recall a few very minor bumps to her cars, which to the best of my recollection were not her fault anyway. Mum always had quite good sized cars, including a BMW, a Granada Scorpio and later on the newer Scorpio. I believe the driving problems really began when she got into her mid-sixties though.

I had lived away from the Channel Island of Guernsey for some years, so when I finally decided to return to live it had been some time since I had last traveled in a car with my Mum driving. When I did it therefore came as quite a shock to me how much her driving had deteriorated. It wasn't more than a few minutes before I found myself unable to relax because I was watching all the other vehicles at every junction to make sure I could point them out to Mum if she looked as if she might not have seen them. Even performing maneuvers in car parks etc, she was coming dangerously close to clipping other vehicles that were parked nearby, apparently oblivious and disbelieving when I pointed it out to her.

Her driving had slowed to an unbearable pace that was probably enough to cause accidents in itself, (as frustrated motorists might take risks in order to overtake her and continue their journey at the normal speed limit). God help anyone who tried to tell Mum her driving was not as good as it used to be though. Immediately she would (and still does) become very defensive, quoting people who had 'always said what an excellent driver she was', even though these people in most cases said it about 30-40 years ago (or more).

Any minor scrapes she has now are usually when she is using my Step Father's jeep, and you can bet your life she will always have a reason to say it is the other driver who was at fault, even though I am now inclined to doubt that this is the case. Of course my Step Father gets very angry that his new jeep has now got a scrape on the back or a small dent etc, and then Mum gets mad defending her driving skills, and threatens to begin using her own car instead. Mum's 'own car' is the large Ford Scorpio that usually resides in the garage these days, waiting for their next trip to the UK where the roads are a decent width as opposed to the tiny country lanes that Guernsey is covered in. We have all spent the last few years trying to persuade Mum to sell this large car and buy a small car that she can easily drive on the small roads here, but again, she defends the fact she wants to keep this large vehicle by stating how 'she has always had nice cars', and 'what a useful car it is to have when they travel to the UK or have friends over to stay'. One thing is certain, she will not admit this car is now too big for her and that she also incapable of driving it in the safe way she once could.

Currently my Mother is in her seventies, and suffering a spiraling myriad of health problems, including a 'frozen shoulder', a recent knee replacement, arthritis etc. Surely even with power steering and an automatic gearbox she should be retested or at least assessed following a refresher course! My Step Father is becoming increasingly alarmed as he quotes incidents such as how Mum will creep over a junction only looking in the direction the traffic would be coming nearest to her, before then checking the traffic coming the other way at the point she has her half of the road sealed off. As he says, if a vehicle overtook another vehicle on the other side of the road, that vehicle would crash straight into her car, potentially killing someone. Even my Sister, (a non driver) says Mum talks incessantly when driving, and sometimes it seems clear she hasn't noticed another car coming as a result of not being able to fully concentrate whilst chatting. If my Sister says, 'Mum, look out, there's a car', Mum immediately says 'You don't need to tell me, I have seen it'. But as Sis points out, if Mum hadn't seen the other car and she said nothing, it would be too late. I don't think either of us are convinced Mum is being totally truthful when she says she has seen these other vehicles approaching.

The trouble of course is that like many older people, she is proud, and also refuses to believe her driving is anything other than the standard it once was. Clearly her driving has got to a stage where she should be made to take a new course and driving test, or not be allowed to drive at all, but she would only agree to do that if legally forced to. The worst thing is she loves shopping and getting out and about, and she would be miserable if unable to do so. Buses are not really a practical option for her because of the fact she cannot carry shopping around or walk far with her physical problems, and my Sister (who formerly suffered a stroke at a young age), also relies on our Mum to pick her up and take her shopping much of the time.

It is a difficult problem to find a solution to. If I try to have conversations with Mum about getting rid of her large Scorpio car and getting a smaller vehicle, whilst explaining my concerns about her driving skills, she gets angry and defensive, still stubbornly refusing to let go of the big vehicle. Meanwhile every time she is late getting back from shopping in our Step Dad's car, he is worrying she may have had an accident, (especially if it is getting dark).

Even our Step Father freely admits he knows his driving has deteriorated as the years have gone on (he too is in his seventies), and whilst I know he drives even slower than Mum (again very frustrating if you are in a hurry and they are giving you a lift), in most other ways he still appears to be the more competent driver.

Conclusion

I suspect that an upper age limit on drivers might be rather excessive as clearly there are some excellent older drivers on the roads. I do however think refresher courses at periodic intervals should be compulsory once a person reaches a certain age, possibly somewhere between 65 and 75 years old, and a new driving test a legal requirement if recommended by the instructor upon completion of the course. Perhaps another legal requirement should be to limit the size and CC of vehicles senior citizens are allowed to drive, which would be a good idea in conjunction with the refresher driving courses for the older person, (actually refresher courses for young drivers for the first few years or driving might not be a bad idea either).

I love my Mum, and I don't want her to feel confined to the house and dependent on lifts everywhere she wants to go, but likewise I don't want her getting killed, killing or injuring someone else as a result of continuing to drive the way she does now.


What do you think?

Do you believe there should be an upper age limit for driving?

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Do you believe annual driving refresher courses should be compulsory after a certain age?

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If you are over 60, do you believe your driving has deteriorated in recent years?

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Do you believe all drivers over a certain age should have to pass an annual driving test?

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Comments 44 comments

Just Ask Susan profile image

Just Ask Susan 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

Here in Ontario, Canada once a driver hits the age of 80 they must pass a vision and written test every 2 years as well as Participate in a group education session — a ministry counsellor will teach a small group of seniors about how aging affects driving, tips on driving and new traffic laws (lasts about 90 minutes).


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 5 years ago

I'd like all drivers to have to pass a test whenever they have to renew their licence no matter what age they are. Bad driving is not just a thing of old people or young people. Safety is first.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Hi Just Ask Susan, I believe in the UK there was talk of implementing a law which stated at X age people would have to take another driving test, but to the best of my knowledge it isn't law yet. I like the sound of what they do in Ontario though, that sounds an excellent idea.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Hi Flora, I agree that would be the ideal, but depending on where you live a driving license can have decades on it before it needs to be renewed anyway. The statistics actually back up the fact that the majority of accidents actually involve new teen-age drivers or drivers over the age of 65. As we live in a society where people are now living to far older ages, I am guessing it would be a mammoth task to re-test everybody regularly, so the main efforts would best be targeted toward the high risk groups.


Paradise7 profile image

Paradise7 5 years ago from Upstate New York

Having older drivers pass a test every year makes more sense to me than setting an arbitrary age limit for drivers.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Yes, I think you could well be right on that Paradise7 :)


FloraBreenRobison profile image

FloraBreenRobison 5 years ago

in B.C. I think it is 5 years-just like a passport. But as a non-driver I don't know.-it might be only 4 years-certainly no more than 5. I had no idea that some states had such a large gap of years.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

In the UK you have a driving license in two parts, the paper part and a card with your photo on. The photo card has to be renewed every ten years, but the paper part lasts from when you take your test until you are 70 years old.

Interesting, passports in the UK are ten years between renewals, so five sounds really low.


quester.ltd profile image

quester.ltd 5 years ago

sorry about your Mum's driving but I believe it has more to do with the person than age - Paul Newman was still racing in his 70's and doing quite well - Life has all types of surprises for us as we go through life - don't make judgments on someone just because of their age.

q


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

The trouble is quester.ltd that you have pointed out the exception that proves the rule. Just because you can find one individual who did drive well when they were in their 70's does not mean the majority do!! The accident stats show differently, and if a person over 70 can still be an exception to the rule they will have nothing to worry about as they will sail through any test they have to take.


tirelesstraveler profile image

tirelesstraveler 5 years ago from California

Oh was a worry, the day when the aged parent must surrender a drivers license. In California you renew your license every 3-5 years depending on how old you are. They can demand you take a behind the wheel test if you have an accident. My mother had an accident,surrendered her license, and there was a fowl-up with paper work. She got angry and decided to take the test to prove she could still drive. They didn't renew the license, but by then she didn't really want it. She was 89. Her driving wasn't too bad. She never drove far. The fowl-up making her mad probably saved her life because she had fallen deeply into depression. I am amazed that once you get a license in UK you are good until 70.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Yes, me too tirelesstraveler, but it is true. I see so many elderly people (not just my Mum, who is quite frankly one of the better ones), driving appallingly badly, even doing things like missing their exit on a roundabout, stopping and then reversing backwards in order to go down the exit they intended to. As a former bus driver and later a chauffeur driver I can list numerous other examples that are equally as bizarre.

When working as a forecourt cashier I even saw one elderly driver pull in when we had closed the forecourt for a fuel delivery. What was crazy about this was the fact she had to run over two large traffic cones to enter the forecourt, and when she pulled up at the petrol pump she clearly had no clue she had run over any object on the way in. Scary if you think that could have been a child or a dog very easily!!!


diogenes 5 years ago

Get off this one, Missy. I am an elderly driver and have driven 50 plus years WITHOUT ANY ACCIDENTS!! And if you yonkers are behind an elderly driver, be PATIENT! You will be one soon. Why do you think insurers charge much more in premiums for young drivers that those over 60 or 70? Their stats. aren't wrong. Older drivers are more likely to obey speed limits and rive taxed and insured vehicles with up to date maintenance. They are less likely to drive drunk and/or drugged and less likely to engage in real road rage. You have targetted the wrong group, Missy, sorry Bob


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 5 years ago from St. Louis, MO

Hi Misry! You are so right. My uncle had a very bad car accident in August. He suffered a traumatic brain injury...now he can't drive by law for 6 months - to make sure he doesn't have a seizure. If he does not have one he is supposed to be able to just begin driiving again. This should probably never happen!! His reaction time is terrible...his driving wasn't the best before the accident!

I am going to do my very best to keep him off the road. I say this because I know that he had one accident - thankfully he didn't hurt anyone else. When the time comes I plan to say, "how would you feel if you wrecked again! Would you want to hurt another rperson or a child?"

My grandfather drove until he only had partial vision in one eye!! I think we owe it to other drivers on the road to make sure elderly have been tested for vision and competency. I wouldn't want my family to be wiped out by someone who shouldn't be driving.

Up and everything!


Dave Mathews profile image

Dave Mathews 5 years ago from NORTH YORK,ONTARIO,CANADA

Misty: As a senior myself, I see the drivers in the younger generations, being the cause of more traffic jams and accidents than people of my age group.

I have been behind the wheel for 48 years now accident free, because I learned how to be totally aware and observant of every vehicle on the road with me as I drive.

Being Canadian driving in cold wet snowy icy conditions, I was taught proper defensive driving skills.

Especially today I have certain skills and abilities behind the wheel that I could teach others, others with little or no abilities whatsoever.

It is not we senior citizen drivers that the public needs to be on the lookout for it is the wreckless, irresponsible teens, foreigners, and younger drivers who are "DUI", Speeding at deadly speeds and practicing unsafe road practices, which put me and all others at risk.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Sorry if this one caused you any offence Bob, and I am sure you are most likely the exception to the rule and your lack of accidents proves it. The problem does exist though, and whilst I can't say at what age the balance tips exactly as it varies from person to person, there are clearly people driving in their later years who are unable to cope with today's traffic, don't see as well as they used to and their reflexes have slowed right down. It is possible they use the roads less at that age, and so the insurance companies keep premiums lower to reflect this. Essentially overall as a section of society the older people have less accidents probably because they use the roads less, but in road accidents in general, the highest age groups of society involved are the new teen drivers and the over 65's.

I am sure you must see it yourself driving around, I mean I am the first to complain about women drivers and I am one, but they dither around so much when parking etc, not ALL of the time, but MUCH of the time.

I agree that young drivers lack the experience, often drive stupidly and really should be off the roads in many cases. They use their new found freedom of driving a lot though, and combined with a lack of experience their accident levels are going to be higher, as will their insurance premiums.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Hi RealHousewife, I hope your Uncle gets better, it must be such a worry that he could have another seizure at any time. I am glad you are taking the risk of him driving again seriously however, both for his sake and other people's. Whilst there are many excellent older drivers on the roads, it is a sad fact of life that reflexes do slow down as we grow older, and this is something that happens so gradually that we often don't even notice. My Mother is proving to be a clear example of this.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Hi Dave, I totally agree that the worst and most dangerous drivers in society are "wreckless, irresponsible teens, foreigners, and younger drivers who are "DUI"". I certainly was not trying to say senior citizens were in some kind of competition with those extreme groups in terms of 'Worst Driver Awards'.

I fear that the point of why I wrote this article has been missed somewhat. I am not saying ALL older drivers are dangerous. What I am saying is that many older people carry on driving when really they should not be on the roads because their driving has deteriorated and they haven't recognised it. My Mum is the classic example of this. Even my Step Father freely admits that he knows his driving is not what it once was, and he worries about my Mum driving on the roads at all now he sees the things she does wrong that she never would have done in her younger driving days. Of course when we try to gently point this out she too gets defensive, but I suspect she would get a shock if a driving instructor took her out now and told her what she was doing wrong.

It sounds like you and Bob are both excellent drivers because neither of you have had any accidents in all your years of driving. I am sure though you must have seen plenty of senior drivers that you knew should not be continuing to drive.


Dave Mathews profile image

Dave Mathews 5 years ago from NORTH YORK,ONTARIO,CANADA

Misty: I understood your aims with this Hub, I know what you were trying to say. I feel that most senior drivers are aware of the fact that there are risks involved with seniors on the road, mainly because of health issues, but unless we as a driver are in that serious a condition that we indanger others on the road, then why should we be treated any differently from others who drive "DUI" or chatting or texting on cells, or putting on their makeup, or arguing with passengers in the back.


Dave Mathews profile image

Dave Mathews 5 years ago from NORTH YORK,ONTARIO,CANADA

Misty: A teen or someone in their twenties or thirties or older is just as susceptible to having a heart attack as any senior. Anyone's vision or abilities to respond are in as much danger of failing as a senior. I can out drive in a responsible way 99.9% of the drivers I have to deal with on the road today, why because I was trained how to do so which most drivers today haven't got a clue about. If I had my way and if I was able to do so, I'd be pulling people off the roads simply for their stupidity, not because of ther age,slowness,or having a senior moment and forgetting where they are.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Hello again Dave, well I really hope no-one treats a senior driver the same as someone DUI, putting on makeup, texting etc. Over here they would be in court for dangerous driving if they did those things. I wouldn't want to see a senior driver in court simply for, well, driving lol.

I have worked as a Bus Driver and a Chauffeur driver in my time, and in both cases a driving test and a medical had to be passed before I could legally drive other people around. In the case of Bus Driving I could be subject to random drug tests at any time. This is something that is naturally very important for the safety of both passengers and other road users.

I just see (and saw), so many older people driving that really should no longer be on the roads, that it seems a good idea to have some kind of system in place that ensures the good senior drivers can continue to drive, and the bad senior drivers either cannot, or can have free refresher courses that allow them to continue driving, but more safely.


Allana Calhoun profile image

Allana Calhoun 5 years ago from Chicago, Illinois

Here in Illinois they do decrease the number years a license is valid as you get in the elderly years. This means they have to renew more often and can be tested more often. I can't remember if it turns annual at any age. Elderly persons should not get offended by any legislation setting up this sort of regulation on licenses because even those in the best of health still need to be checked up on as far as memory or reflexes. It is simply something that tends to deteriorate with age - a scientific fact.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Thanks Allana, that seems like a sensible system to me and avoids the problem of the drivers whose abilities have deteriorated from causing any danger to others, at the same time as those without any problems will clearly sail through any extra tests. As you said "even those in the best of health still need to be checked up on as far as memory or reflexes. It is simply something that tends to deteriorate with age - a scientific fact."


Green Lotus profile image

Green Lotus 5 years ago from Atlanta, GA

This is an important article, and it appears to be a controversial one too!...but thanks for putting it out there. I too have an aging Mom who refused to stop driving even though she was a menace on the road. If more people knew how to successfully get their parents to stop driving when they become a danger to themselves and others that would be ideal - but it's not gonna happen so quickly. I'm all for adapting Canadian law in this regard as described by Just Ask Susan. I'm also for banning cell phone use while driving, but that's another story!


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

They have already banned cell phone use whilst driving here in the UK Green Lotus, although they sometimes take it to extremes and have done people for simply glancing the screen in order to reject the call or check the time as opposed to actually 'using' the phone.

This subject is proving to be controversial as you have noticed. I always knew it would be because of the reaction my Mum has shown to me when I have pointed out areas of her driving that are definitely unsafe.


The Old Firm profile image

The Old Firm 5 years ago from Waikato/Bay Of Plenty, New Zealand

Misty, in NZ your licence has to be renewed every 5 years now (I think) with an associated eye test. This is basically just a revenue collecting exercise. However a 5 yearly medical (from your GP) is required as well from 65 on until 80, when the renewal requirement is increased to biannually. Until recently a new practical test was needed biannually from 80 on but this has been dropped in favour of the medical assessment, I think wisely so, as the (private) driving assessors were notorious for failing the individual on their first attempt for trivialities and thus collecting a second test fee. I understand that if the GP is unsure of your ability he can refuse to fully complete the provided assessment form and suggest a practical test.

As we age our vision, reaction time and other processes decline, but at a slower rate for some than for others. I knew a 97 year old who was driving his beloved Model A around town daily and to rallies about the country regularly with skill and perfect safety (and considerable speed for a Model A!) He gave up driving later that year after breaking a leg, and noticing a minor vision loss.

I also have encountered many in their thirties who, although they MAY be competent drivers shouldn't be let behind a wheel. Prime examples are women from a yuppy suburb, in a 4 wheel drive, with a girlfriend in the front seat and small children in the rear - disaster on a shopping trip! Add the word Asian to the above mix and it's best to get well off the road, leave your vehicle, run like hell, and hide in a large concrete building for at least an hour until they've gone past or hit someone else.

The elderly may do stupid things sometimes but so does everybody, you and me included, although not often I hope. They at least do it more slowly most of time and we have a better chance of keeping clear.

Cheers Kid,

The (decrepit, geriatric, semi-senile) Old Firm.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

LOL TOF, what a truly great comment, and you certainly brought a smile to my face, plus making some very valid points. I guess the problem is when you are a driver by profession (which I was) you see drivers doing silly things all day, every day, and sadly my observations were that apart from the youngsters driving like idiots, the older generations seemed to come a close second. Of course there are drivers in every age group who should not be allowed to be on the road because they drive like morons, but as you say, "As we age our vision, reaction time and other processes decline, but at a slower rate for some than for others.", and this is largely the point I was trying to make. A refresher course or a test can judge this and do something about it only IF there is a problem.

By the way, I totally agree with you on the 'yuppy women in 4 wheel drive' vehicles. They drive me mad too.

Loved your sign off too LOL. (sure it's not true)


The Old Firm profile image

The Old Firm 5 years ago from Waikato/Bay Of Plenty, New Zealand

Thanks for the quick reply Misty.

I've done a bit of what I suppose is Professional driving as well, including about 15 years around Auckland in trucks of the 5-10 ton range. Building supplies, bottle pick-ups; cash deliveries and pick-ups from banks in armoured trucks for several of those years, and for the last six of them as my own firm delivering lead products. (Which is why I have a 42in chest and my knuckles drag on the ground)

New Zealanders as a people are generally poor drivers, and Aucklanders noticeably so, even to other New Zealanders - Incompetent, inconsiderate, discourteous trrrrrrrrrrbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb\

[\] (the last comment was done by my cat who likes helping!)

When Hongkong closed we got a lot of Chinese, whose driving could be the subject of a Hub on it's own.

Auckland also has the largest Pacific Islander population of the world, another group that's driving is suspect but who's vehicles are MUCH cheaper.

Your Mum would be at home in Auckland and probably no-one would really notice.

Cheers again,

Peter.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

LOL, I shall suggest the emigration prospects to her and blame it on you TOF. Say hi to your cat, I have one that also attempts to type for me much of the time :)


The Old Firm profile image

The Old Firm 5 years ago from Waikato/Bay Of Plenty, New Zealand

Missy (The Cat) says Hi. What are you doing up at this hour?

Cheers.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Tell the cat I am as 'barmy as a box of frogs' and that is why I am still up. He is so going to love the hub I am working on now, so watch out for it ;)


carcro profile image

carcro 5 years ago from Winnipeg

Driving is a last testament to ones independence, so I can see how the elderly want to hang onto it as long as they can. That being said, I also know how scary it is to have them go without testing. For many if they were tested today, they certainly would fail, just of the physical ability of being able to check their blind spots, never mind any of the rules. So where do we start? It would probably save more than a few lives every year if we did pull some of them off the road. I hope someday when I'm there I have the sense to stop driving when I'm unable to physically see and react to the traffic. Great Hub, voted Up!


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Thanks carcro, you made some excellent and valid points :)


carcro profile image

carcro 5 years ago from Winnipeg

Thanks mistyhorizon2003, we have a family member currently at that point in his life, so this really hits home. I just pray he stops driving soon.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Good luck on that Carcro :)


Pamela N Red profile image

Pamela N Red 5 years ago from Oklahoma

You bring up a great point, Misty and I do agree that some people should have their license revoked but don't think it should be based on age. Possibly give them a test to make sure they are still competent. My great grandmother drove her own care into her 90's and did well but I've seen some who really shouldn't be on the road and are a hazard not only to themselves but everyone else.

We all age at different levels and some remain sharp as a tack into very late years while some seem to fade much earlier.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

I definitely feel like a test would be better than simply revoking the license at a 'set' age Pamela. Like you said 'We all age at different levels', therefore this could determine who was showing signs of deteriorating driving standards or not, and take the appropriate action as a result. Actually I think it would be a good idea if everyone had to take a driving test every ten years or so, as lots of people get lazy or drift into bad habits, (even disregarding aging causing slower reflexes and gradually failing senses.)


R. J. Lefebvre 5 years ago

Cindy, You are certainly on the right key. I suppose police officers would pull over a demonstrated dangerous driver in the interest for all on or near the rightof way. Perhaps, you can take your concern to the law enforcement agency and at least alarm them. You don't have to tattle on your family or friends if you don't want to unless you feel like you have no choice. It's a funny thing, I sometimes have a difficult time watching an English or Irish video and understand it all, I suppose you may have the same problem watching an American or Canadian dialect?

Ronnie


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

It would not work here Ronnie, the island is just too small, plus it would feel like I was betraying my Mum (apart from anything else she is very well known on the island as a former celebrity, so the gossip would run riot). In any case the Police would never act on this because so many other elderly people are driving round in the same way, so they would have to take them all off the roads, and to do that they would have to offer a very good reason in each case.

As for understanding dialects, well I have no problems with American or Canadian dialects, but then I watch so many American series, films etc that I am used to it.

Cheers for your input here

Cindy


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 5 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Hi lindo444, great comment, but for me to show it you will need to post it again without the insurance company link (Spam) sorry.


RealHousewife profile image

RealHousewife 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO

Oh Misty - man my mom is getting BAD at driving! She went the wrong way down the highway not long ago! Then she made me promise not to tell my step dad! Ugh! She drives a little Mercedes and still can't stay in her own lane! Now when we go out - she makes me drive so I won't complain about how she drives. I'm worried all the time and yesterday she had her eyes dialated and drove herself home! Omg!

Ok ok I'll shut up now but this has been a worry for me:). I would LOVE to hear more about where you live...sounds so awesome! Have you written a hub about it already?


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 4 years ago from North America

A driving test every 5 years would be good for all of us, since when driving laws change, we receive no notification. We must to to the DMV and pick up a pamphlet yearly. Some of us can register our cars for 5 years instead of one, so might forget about the pamphlets in between.

The last time I ever rode in a car with one aging relative, she drove down the highway on the wrong side of the road, laughing maniacally and paying "chicken" with oncoming traffic. We needed law reinforcement to follow her several times at random in order to lift her license. Here in Ohio, police are notified to follow a senior citizen, pull the person over when they drive erratically, take their keys, and the car must be towed. Then a hearing is convened wherein a judge will revoke the driving license.


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 4 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

LOL Kelly, that really does sound scary.

To answer your question about where I live, yes I have done several Hubs about Guernsey, but a couple of links you might want to look at are:

http://hubpages.com/travel/GuernseyActivitiesandPl...

and

http://hubpages.com/travel/Guernsey-Picture-Galler...


mistyhorizon2003 profile image

mistyhorizon2003 4 years ago from Guernsey (Channel Islands) Author

Oh Patty, the mental image of your elderly relative laughing manically as she drove the wrong way up the highway is actually very funny, although I am sure it wasn't at the time. I am impressed that the Police can pull over the person for erratic driving and that the license can be revoked by a judge though.

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