Splitfire Coil Packs

Splitfire Coil Packs
Splitfire Coil Packs

So what are coil packs?

Splitfire Coil Packs are an aftermarket solution to expensive OEM ignition coils. Coil packs are used in automotive and marine applications. Coil packs work by transforming the 12 volts provided by the vehicle's battery into the thousands of volts range (20 to 30 thousand, according the Wikipedia). This 20 to 30 thousand volts are required to fire (or spark) the spark plugs. Modern systems eliminate the traditional distributer, utilizing electronically controlled ignition systems.

The automotive aftermarket recognized the need for high quality replacement coil packs when older coilpack equipped vehicles began experiencing coil pack failure. Often, OEM coil packs are very expensive to purchase. The more cylinders the engine has, the more expensive replacing all the coils at once can be, which is often recommended in vehicles which are old, or which have excessively high mileage.

In most cases, aftermarket coil packs can save the consumer hundreds, or even thousands of dollars in replacement costs. Most engines have coils which are easy enough to access, making it easy for a fun DIY project. Inline engines, such as those of the four and six cylinder variety, are often very easy to work on as far as coil packs and spark plugs are concerned. V configuration engines can be much more difficult to work on, depending on how much room the engine bay has, and whether or not the engine is stuffed up agaist a firewall (We're looking at you, front wheel drive V6 configurations!)

Benefits of Splitfire Coil Packs

  • May increase horsepower at higher engine RPMs
  • Ensures maximum energy is supplied to the spark plugs
  • Reduces and/or completely eliminates incomplete combustion caused by misfire
  • Easy installation (A very easy and possibly enjoyable DIY project)

What will Splitfire Coil Packs do for me?

It's simple enough, really. Any replacement coil pack, OEM or aftermarket, will be a good replacement for an aging or dying coil pack. As coil packs age, their performance deteriorates, which can often lead to complete failure of the coil pack itself. Complete failure is often preceeded by apparent running problems, such as misfiring at idle or under load, "occasionally" dead cylinders, and other annoying problems. It is generally a good idea to replace all coil packs at once, so that all your engines cylinders are performing (at least ignition wise) at their best.

It's debateable whether or not aftermarket coil packs are better than their OEM counterparts. Some claim increased horsepower output, however this can also be explained through improved ignition performance that comes with replacing your old, crusty coil packs. At any rate, OEM or aftermarket, you want your coils performing at their best, to ensure long engine life, and good fuel economy. At the end of the day, an aftermarket coil pack such as those offered by Splitfire can be just as effective as an OEM coil pack, at the fraction of the cost.

Splitfire Coil Pack Compatibility

  • Nissan Skyline - BNR32 / HCR32 / BCNR33 / ECR33 / BNR34 / ER34 / EN34
  • Nissan Silvia/180sx - PS13 / RPS13 / S14
  • Nissan Fairlady - CZ32 / GCZ32 (VG30DET/VG30DETT)

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Comments 1 comment

Torque 6 years ago

Well actually the coils do not operate on 12 volts but on around 300 volts.

These days there are always CDI ignition systems, and they use a much higher voltage!

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