The Absolute Solution To Excessive Fatal Speed On Our Highways

Intelligent Speed Adaptation In Practice

In various other Hubs such as Ban Hayabusa, CBR, ZX, YZF, etc. From Roads Now! I've asked the question that no one has satisfactorily answered to date: Why does anyone need a street-licensed motorcycle (or automobile) which can triple or quadruple the highway speed limit?

An Insurance Institute For Highway Safety (IIHS) report released about a year ago showed that per 10,000 registered motorcycles, supersport riders of motorcycles such as Suzuki Hayabusa, Honda CBR, Kawasaki ZX, Yamaha YZF, etc. had a death rate of 22.5, while "other" motorcycles such as street legal enduros, etc. were as low as 4.3. That means that you're 5.23 times more likely to die on one of those hyperspeed sports bikes than on more rational motorcycles.

The growing carnage on our roads has to be stopped now. All motorcyclists must band together to prevent the tiny minority of immature jerks riding ridiculously overpowered two wheeled rocketships such as the Hayabusa, CBR, ZX, YZF and other hypersportsbikes from creating so much bloodshed that the legislative hammers will come down on all of us and force us onto 50cc mopeds with training wheels.

My Hubs on banning various hyperpowered motorcycles sparked a firestorm of opposition from mature, seasoned, rational hyperbikers as well as the vast unwashed masses of speed-addled wanker morons who do 170 mph flybys on public highways just to post them on YouTube, with wanton disregard to not only their safety, but that of the innocent motorists and pedestrians around them.

However, there is now a technological solution that will very satisfactorily address this problem in all motor vehicles, whether it has two wheels, four wheels, or eighteen wheels.

There are various tests going on around the world, from London, England, to Sydney, Australia featuring a GPS-add-on technology which intelligently adapts the speed of a vehicle travelling on a public road by correlating the velocity with the known GPS position and the posted speed limit for that stretch of highway.

There are currently two different Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA) systems in the marketplace: Advisory and Supportive. Advisory systems feature a visual and audio alert to the driver as soon as the vehicle exceeds the speed limit on that particular stretch of road. Supportive systems are more active and they automatically limit the fuel flow to the engine as soon as the vehicle reaches the applicable speed limit. Supportive systems can be overridden by the driver by pushing on a button next to the GPS screen.

The ISA data recorders built into the devices themselves, accumulate data regarding compliance with the speed limit, the rate of traffic infringement, fuel consumption, exhaust emissions, driver overrides, and many different parameters, similar to the telemetry flow on a spacecraft.

The current state of ISA technology is quite good, but what fails is the actual algorithm applied to the devices which does not adequately take into account real world driving situations.

Opponents of speed limiting technologies are correct when they state that a burst of speed over the posted limit is occasionally necessary to get out of trouble. If a vehicle were to be limited exactly to the speed limit posted at the time, it could prove impossible to overtake a slower vehicle as the "break" in opposing traffic is usually way too short to pass if your vehicle can't exceed the speed limit.

Most US states and Canadian provinces have provisos in their traffic laws which allow you to exceed the speed limit if necessary while passing, as long as the vehicle being passed is traveling under the speed limit. Therefore, if you pass a vehicle that is already traveling at the speed limit, you can be ticketed, and so it should be! Our roads are not racetracks! It is legitimate to regularly travel at the speed limit, not above!

That is why The Solution is to implement ISA technology on all street licensed vehicles, and have the government heavily subsidize this installation and inclusion, as the net savings in emergency and long term health care will more than pay for it! However, not with the algorithm which is currently applied to ISAs as it is too simplistic.

The ISA programming must be set up in Supportive mode only, as Advisory mode is pointless and our vehicles already beep and ring at us enough as it is.

The algorithm is as follows, so Supportive mode activates when the speed limit is exceeded by:

  • 10% for a period greater than two minutes, but this level is limited to one use every three minutes, and only sixteen uses per 24 hours or 100 miles (160 km) whichever comes first.

  • 20% for a period greater than 45 seconds, but this level is limited to one use every four minutes, and only eight uses per 24 hours or 100 miles (160 km) whichever comes first.

  • 50% for a period greater than 20 seconds, but this level is limited to one use every eight minutes, and only four uses per 24 hours or 100 miles (160 km) whichever comes first.

Acceleration is also limited to 2 meters per second squared, which is more than enough acceleration for any public road situation and well above what many cars and motorcycles are actually capable of.

The vast majority of reasonable, safe drivers will welcome an ISA with such a program algorithm, as it allows for well over 99% of all rational driving situations and the unprecedented pleasure to be able to drive all day concentrating on the traffic conditions, the scenery, your music player, and your company, rather than constantly fretting over if you've just creeped over the speed limit, or if you were looking somewhere else and missed a lower speed limit posting, etc.

What about the motorists who like to take their vehicle to the track on weekends and race it? No problem. The ISA recognizes that there is no speed limit posted on those GPS coordinates and does not interfere with the driver / rider in any way!

The advantages of this ISA program are enormous. Vehicle insurance rates and fuel consumption will plummet, as so will the number of deaths and injuries on our roads. Countless thousands of people lose their lives each and every year exclusively through excessive speed, whether their own or the velocity of the motorist who hits them. Now that the technology exists, it must be implemented as shown in this Hub. And the sooner the better!

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Comments 87 comments

debris profile image

debris 7 years ago from Florida

Hello Hal,

I think you have a very mature and rational perspective on this subject. It does make sense being able to have extra power to outrun a bad situation, but 4 times the speed limit is quite excessive. How simple would it be for one to circumvent the technology that you've outlined as I'm sure that would quickly become a high paying back alley business.

-Debris


helenathegreat profile image

helenathegreat 7 years ago from Manhattan

Wow, this makes so much sense... Do you know what the cost would be like for requiring vehicles to have this type of system? It seems like it would be hard to implement.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

debris: Actually the first tests in England and Australia have proven that the technology is quite successful and next to impossible to circumvent. If it's turned off then the system will register that fact. It's also quite impossible to manipulate the system to show that slower speeds have been traveled as the correlation to the ongoing GPS position cannot lie.

helenathegreat: The approximate cost right now for this system is about $400 per vehicle but the costs would fall to well below half that level if it were to come into mandated use across North America. Less than $200 a vehicle is a very small price for the government to subsidize when we consider that it would cut accident rates so severely, and the attendant medical and loss costs as well! The actual installation is just as easy as any other GPS, which is now almost a standard in the new cars, and very easy to hook up in older vehicles.


helenathegreat profile image

helenathegreat 7 years ago from Manhattan

Would you require that all older models have this installed within a certain time frame? We've seen how pathetic the switch to digital TV has been; they pushed the deadline back three months, and all people have to do to convert is buy one of those converter boxes at Wal-Mart!

It seems like it might deter people from buying new cars, since they can go faster in old ones. It'd be easy to enforce for companies manufacturing new cars, but how to police vehicles that were already on the roads? That seems a little more complicated.

Also, in response to debris' comment: There would, of course, be a black market industry that would spring up around this (disabling systems, etc), but it would still force otherwise law-abiding citizens to not speed. I know that I can have a bit of a lead foot sometimes, but I certainly wouldn't tamper with my car to be able to speed. I think the benefit here definitely outweighs the cost.


debris profile image

debris 7 years ago from Florida

Hal,

Another issue I have is that I'm vehemntly against the government having trackers on everyone. That's an infringement that would leave me walking everywhere I go. I have nothing to hide, but I do have freedoms, and I don't want to feel like a hamster in a glass tank. Lol.

-Debris


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

helenathegreat: Mandating the installation of a GPS ISA in all vehicles is very simple. Just legislate that you have to prove installation the next time you get your license registration tags renewed. Therefore within a year you have 100% compliance. The Digital TV switch was a mess for countless reasons. The way to avoid a similar mess with GPS ISA is to have a tiny box that can be readily hardwired into the output port of the car's computer (almost all of the cars made in the past couple of decades have one... classics can be fitted with a simple transceiver unit). Anyone can do that just by following very simple instructions in about a minute! Especially if the GPS ISA is fully subsidized by the government, they would be freely available at your local Department of Motor Vehicles and could be active in your vehicle literally within seconds. A couple of hundred dollars or less per vehicle is virtually insignificant if weighed against the medical, damage costs, etc. currently incurred by excessive speed. Again, mandating that it has to be installed in order to get your tags resolves all problems, old and new cars, within one short year. There are always people who try to get around new technology, but the absolute GPS positioning makes this system as impossible to evade as police speed radar. When you drive into the view of the police radar unit, there is nothing (short of spending a few tens of millions of dollars armoring your car with F117 or F22 stealth fighter technology) that is going to fool that radar. In exactly the same way, there is no feasible way to tell a GPS that you are here now but NOT there later.

debris: I can certainly see the reason why you're hesitant to let the government know where you are at all times, but let's face it... we have zero privacy left anyway. Surveillance cameras are everywhere and you can be certain that it is supremely easy to track you through your license plate registration number darn near anywhere you drive today. The GPS ISA wouldn't make that much difference.


debris profile image

debris 7 years ago from Florida

Hal,

You certainly make valid points, but I suppose I'd prefer not setting precedents. I certainly am glad that people are trying to tackle this issue though, it appears to be growing!

-Debris


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Here are some truly chilling statistics for 2007 motorcycle deaths:

•In the United States, motorcycle accident deaths increased by 6.6%, accounting for almost one in eight motor vehicle deaths.

•There were 5,154 motorcycle fatalities nationwide, and 2007 was the 10th straight year of increase.

•Since 1997 biker deaths have increased by 128%.

•31% of motorcycle crash fatalities occurred in the under 30-year-old group in 2007.

•27% percent of motorcycle riders involved in fatal accidents had a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) over 0.08 percent.

•In 2007, 36% of all bikers involved in fatal crashes were speeding, compared with 24% of passenger car drivers.

•26% of bikers involved in fatal crashes were riding without a valid license in 2007.

•There are about 75% more motorcycles registered now than there were 10 years ago.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

BTW, you may see a scientology.org ad on this Hub. For the record, I support Scientology to exactly the same degree I support Satanists who disembowel babies in Black Masses... actually... maybe even less. I have NO control over what ads are placed on my Hubs, but I do not now and never will support or approve of Scientology in any way, shape, or form!


Gypsy Willow profile image

Gypsy Willow 7 years ago from Lake Tahoe Nevada USA , Wales UK and Taupo New Zealand

Good for you about Scientology, totally agree. Your idea is excellent. When ever we see some one scream by us at well over the speed limit, we just say" organ donor" There is a real need for them too.


debris profile image

debris 7 years ago from Florida

@Hal: I agree, I think scientology is a group of people trying to get tax exempt status :-P

@Gypsy: At the speeds I've seen the organs would probably just be liquid as macabre as that sounds!


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

No Hal, I disagree. I was giving this some very serious thought, not only in relation to high performance bikes, and I think it is not an answer. I think the only way to get drivers TO THINK what they do and make intelligent decisions about it is to remove all speed limits altogether. So long as you are having somebody making this decision for drivers, you'll find quite a few people unhappy with that, and quite a few of them finding a way to bypass whatever solution you have.

This actually refers not only to speed limits, but to the whole body of traffic laws. Remove all limits, convert them into recommendations, and let the driver to decide.

However, if his decision was poor and he caused an accident, breaking established recommendations should work against him. For example, he should be required to repay all the liability to insurance company.

This way after a short transition period we will have RESPONSIBILITY on the roads :)


RGraf profile image

RGraf 7 years ago from Wisconsin

Great piece! I had never thought of those reasons for not having the forced speed set in the cars.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Gypsy Willow: I've just written a Hub about these damn Scientology Ads:

http://hubpages.com/community/Sorry--I-Dont-Want-A...

Please check it out and let me know what you think! As for the speeding organ donors I wouldn't even mind THAT much except that I've witnessed too many innocent people get maimed or killed when they had no fault whatsoever. They weren't the ones speeding, they were hit by these organ donors!

debris: I have lots to say about Scientology, but I'm still biting my tongue. I'm not ready to get into a smackdown with Miscavige and Cruise... at least not yet.

Misha: I would love to share in your faith in human nature, but when it comes to traffic laws, I must respectfully disagree. I don't believe that after a bloody transition we would have responsibility, I just think we'd have just more loss of life: IMHO, traffic anarchy would multiply the carnage exponentially. There is no point forcing people to pay for their liabilities since the majority of speeders don't have any savings to speak of and they would just get a judgement and laugh at it. Unfortunately I'll have to stick to my position that traffic laws need to be enforced in a Draconian Big Brother manner to save us all.

RGraf: Thanks! Much appreciated!


jason1701 profile image

jason1701 7 years ago

Ha ha!

I was planning on asking about th scientology thing Hal! Perhaps you should do a hub on it, but then I dont want them to stalk you and silence you!!

Your Idea is excellent, but then I would say that because Im with u on it anyway. This idea lets people still own a bike of the speed and quality of a Hayabusa! I can still tell my mates that its a 200mph bike and see their jelousey! I can still have the same torque at my disposal! Excellent!

If high speed crashes are what you/they/we are trying to avoid, I hope that the device doesn't work off major roads i.e, Limmiting to 80-90 I would be happy with, but feeling the power cut down and up each time I went from a 20mph to a 30, 40 then a 30 again would be a bit annoying. But if it stops 100mph+ racing (on roads) then I give it the thumbs up!

Debris.

I wonder, do you use a mobile cell phone? A record of where you are within say a 100 yard radious is constantly logged. Its ben used to solve crimes already. Your Internet provider knows exactly what sites you have been on! and so forth. At least if your car gets stolen it can be tracked.

The lowering of insurance premiums would more than cover the cost of these devices to be fitted in cars. New technology is always expensive to start with, but in a couple of years plummets! Look at navigation GPS, they were £400-£500 4-5 year ago when they came out here and now you can get them for £40

Here's an Emedal for you Hal!


jason1701 profile image

jason1701 7 years ago

Misha!

What if the stupid rider crashes into a family car, kills the family and himself? Who pays the bill? Who learns any lessons?


Deece profile image

Deece 7 years ago from Piqua, OH

That is an awsome hub Hal, and I do agree with the fact that there is a really good chance that it will greatly cut back on high speed accidents. Unfortunatly there will still be the idiots that will drive stupid at the speed limit. But this hub is not about those idiots it is about limiting and tracking. I do agree that the benefits outweigh the costs and downsides. Personally I am a law abidding citizen and I always do the speed limit even though I am a pizza delivery guy...lol. But I dont think I could ever drive/ride a vehicle with one of those on it. I would sooner take the motor/tranny out of the bike and build my own. And the same with the car. And if I was not able to do that, then the one law I would break would be taking that thing off of my vehicle. I have a great driving record and I wont change that. I think that if I am on any road and the speed limit suddenly drops, or I need to pass more than one slow vehicle, and all of a sudden the motor vehicle suddenly slows down or there is no throttle reaction it would merely cause a bad case of road rage. Just like if you are driving and all of a sudden your head gasket blows or your differential blow, it just simply p!$$es you off. And I wouldn't want that personally.

But I do gotta say Hal that is an awsome hub and an awsome solution by all means. I look forward to more from you. Thanks


debris profile image

debris 7 years ago from Florida

@Jason1701 - Yes I use a cell phone, but no worry to me as I can leave it at home. As for internet, I mainly use unsecured wireless connections and my computer was bought second hand with cash. I do my best to maintain my anonymity because it is quickly disappearing and I like my anonymity. Believe me, I certainly understand many of the means of tracking in the digital age. It borders on creepy. Many of the technologies packed as modern day conveniences are simply a means of tracking.


Deece profile image

Deece 7 years ago from Piqua, OH

I agree with debris, that is another reason why I would not want one,nor would I allow one on my vehicle(s). I can say with 100% certaintly that if I do not wish to be known where I am and what I am doing, it happens.


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

LOL Hal, then we will have to agree to disagree on this, cause obviously we both gave it a fair amount of thought based on our not-so-short driving/riding and life experience. And I am not fixated on repaying insurance, there are other means of punishment, which would be justified by real damage with such an approach - unlike now, when one of the safest drivers around (me LOL) has to serve a jail sentence just for breaking an arbitrary traffic rule. :)

Jason, unfortunately this will happen time to time, especially in the beginning - pretty much like it happens now, with those same people causing it. However, over time such an approach will change the driving culture, and dramatically reduce the number of accidents.

And one more thought Jason, about family car accident - it ALWAYS takes two to tango, and the vast majority of accidents could have been avoided if AT LEAST ONE PARTY did the right thing. Driving is probably the most risky activity an average person ever engages in, and no family car driver should take his (and his passengers safety) for granted - he/she should actively pursue it. :)


helenathegreat profile image

helenathegreat 7 years ago from Manhattan

Hal, you CAN control the advertisements on your hubs!  At least, you can block ones you don't want (like scientology adverts)!!

http://hubpages.com/forum/topic/15248  Read that immediately; it changed the whole way I view AdSense.

Also...  Take this (your hub, not the AdSense thing, obviously) to a senator or something!  Clearly you have it very well-thought-out, and I'm sure there will be a lot of pro-privacy people out there who will go crazy over it, but... It might become a law eventually.

Also re: privacy...  Couldn't you make it so the GPS only communicated with the satellite, and that information wasn't available anywhere else?  Or that the GPS couldn't be linked to the car specifically, that it was just a number?  I don't think we should use this technology to be able to tell where a car is at a certain time and to whom it is registered, etc.


jason1701 profile image

jason1701 7 years ago

Misha,

your missing Hals point thruout many of these hubs! It doesn't take 2 to tango at all! A family car can be travelling down a road at 70mph doing nothing wrong, everything correct. A Hayabusa can be coming the other way too fast and loose control because of its speed and career straight into that innocent car before the family know what the hells going on! Bang, 2 children and mum and dad are dead all because of someone irresponsible. A change in driving culture wont happen on its own. There will allways be a 'need for speed' and impress culture. If that bike was limited to 80mph it would not slice thru the family car as it would at high velocity.

Everyone else!

I ont do anything wrong, so there for I dont give a shit if Im being tracked!


Alexander Mark profile image

Alexander Mark 7 years ago from beautiful, rainy, green Portland, Oregon

This is a well though out hub, (as usual). I cannot deny that this solution would be easy to implement, cheap and very effective. However, with its implementation, the ISA takes away our freedom. This regulation treats all of us like children who are unable to think for ourselves. It's true that many people act this way, but those of us who do the right thing should not be punished for their stupidity. You might as well take away our right to vote because we might vote for the "wrong" guy.

As soon as I read this, I wanted to respond. Instead I waited until I got home to write a hub, here's the link if I may:

hubpages.com/hub/freedomdieswithGPSspeedgovernor (for some reason it won't link to the hubpage so you'll have to copy and paste).

I did not address privacy, and it deserves an answer as well. ISA will put mandatory GPS systems in our vehicles. It may be possible to track us now, but ISA will make it infinitely easier.

I am in complete disagreement ISA systems are THE answer to road problems.


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

LOL Jason, I know Hal's point very good, and I DO agree to him that those bikes are too dangerous. We disagree on a solution though. :)

In turn, you missed my point completely. Take a look at the poll I posted a while ago on my forums, and try to understand what exactly I was trying to say there :)

http://www.funandsafedriving.com/ftopict-125.html (Hal, hope you don't mind me posting a link here)

Alexander, I doubt it will be very effective. People always find ways to fool the technology, either with a help of different technology, or with some other tricks. So I bet after a short period of safety improvement everything will be back on track safety (or rather un-safety) wise - but yet another freedom erosion will stay in place till the next revolution...


Aya Katz profile image

Aya Katz 7 years ago from The Ozarks

Misha, I agree with you that controlling a driver's vehicle for him is not the solution. I also tend to agree about the speed limit. However, not all traffic laws are optional. Right of way laws and which side of the street to drive on should be enforced, or we will have total chaos.

Hal, thanks for writing a hub that inspires this sort of discussion.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

jason1701: Thanks for the Emedal! I'll proudly wear it on my Echest! :)

As I told Gypsy Willow, I've just written a Hub on that Scientology Ad mess:

http://hubpages.com/community/Sorry--I-Dont-Want-A...

since I would much rather associate myself with neo-Nazi skinhead racist lynchmobs than Scientologists. At least the neo-Nazis just kill people, they don't slowly bleed them to death over many years.

There will come a day when I will take on the Unholy Trinity of Miscavige, Cruise, and the ghost of Hubbard, but that day is not yet. But when I do WATCH OUT. It's gonna be ugly. I promise you that.

That is one of the major advantages of the GPS ISA. You can ride a fuel dragster on the road if you can get it licensed. Ride it to the 7-11 and the high school, get all the chicks hot, but you're still riding / drively sanely on the public roads. You wanna open her up? Go to the strip and rip off a 5 second quarter mile! :)

Actually the ISA algorithm I've outlined doesn't work as "feeling the power cut down and up each time I went from a 20mph to a 30, 40 then a 30 again". You have full Hayabusa power at all times as long as your acceleration rate is below 2 meters/sec2. Then when you reach the speed limit if you decide to stay there, you can with no noticeable effect. But if you want to exceed it (and you haven't used up your daily allotment), you can go right to 50% over the limit and stay there for 20 seconds before you start getting throttled back, first to 20% over then to 10% over and then after two minutes, back down to the posted limit. That is more than enough speed to overtake anything on the road, even a pig haulin' truck convoy! :)

Deece: Thanks! Of course anyone can ride / drive like a maniac below the speed limit. When I was much younger and much stupider, I once got pulled over by the police while riding my Yamaha XT500. I wasn't speeding, but what got the cop's attention was that I was wheelying for about half a mile while standing on the saddle. That will get a cop's attention every time! There was another time when I was pulled over on an Interstate while riding an Interstate (Gold Wing) with the cruise on and my arms and legs crossed. Hey, I'd been riding all day and I was sore... Still I cannot possibly excuse stupidity like that, even though it was not at excessive speed.

The only way GPS ISA can work is if its universal. If the telemetry flow gets interrupted there would have to be a sanction: Either a fine or a licensing suspension. Personally (and speaking only for me me and me) I would welcome GPS ISA. I would love to drive around wherever I want without paying the slightest attention to the posted speed limits, knowing my car / bike would not exceed that limit and leave me safe and free from the worry of getting a ticket when I inadvertently exceed the limit.

Exactly that happened to me a few months ago. I was driving along a road about 100 km (60 miles) from my house with a 60 kph (37 mph) limit. I came to a stop sign and turned right. I continued to drive at 60 kph, and found an RCMP cruiser pulling me over to ticket me for going 10 over the limit. Apparently the limit on this road was 50 kph (30 mph). I got out of the ticket by telling the cop that there was no posted sign from the time I turned until he pulled me over and that since I was far from my home I couldn't be expected to ascertain speed limits by mental telepathy. He agreed and let me go.

That was a clear case of not wanting to exceed the limit but doing so anyway. In cases like that GPS ISA would keep you safe and law abiding at all times!

debris: As a good Canadian I hightailed it north of the border long before the 9/11 paranoia set into the USA and every alien was seen to be a closet terrorist. At the time I had known a Canadian who stayed, completely illegally, in California since the 70s. He lived in SF, so he took public transit everywhere and had never had a bank account, a drivers license, a US Social Security card, a credit card, a passport or darn near anything else. He's probably scrood blued and tattooed now as he might not be able to get back home to his family in Canada without biometric ID though. (Actually it occurs to me that the name he was known by was very likely not the one on his birth certificate...) However, he proves that it can be done to live in the shadows completely if you're really committed to that, although in this day and age I certainly don't recommend it. Does anyone really want to live in the cash only mode in a plastic world? I don't. I am a law abiding dolt. I don't do drugs other than Aspirin, I have a couple of beers per year, and the only remotely illegal thing I ever do is that I occasionally walk by my open bay window coming out of the shower without a towel on. And although that may or may not be outright illegal, if you were my neighbors you'd certainly find it DISGUSTING AND STOMACH TURNING! :)

Misha: I checked out your Hubs for info on this traffic jailing and I couldn't find anything. What's this about you going to The Big House?

helenathegreat: Thank you for the link and I was aware of the blocking, but my primary thesis is that Google should not be placing these ads at all. I doubt that they would accept ads from the Ku Klux Klan (Know Yourself, Know Life, Know That You're Better Than The Blacks") and there is little doubt that Scientology is no better than the Klan. The vast majority of people will not use the block as they don't even know about it, thus the EVIL message goes out on millions of sites, besmirching by association the reputation of countless bloggers and website operators. It's wrong and it does not belong in Google Ads.

GPS ISA trials in England, Australia and other places are currently being carefully monitored by transportation departments around the world. I'd love to get my algorithm included as I believe it's the best way to have a system that would be readily accepted by the vast majority of motorists.

The problem with the anonymity is that it makes it impossible to confirm that you haven't disabled the GPS ISA and are driving around with impunity. As others have clearly noted on this comment section, Big Brother can find you darn near anywhere if he really wants to. Do you know how many public areas have face recognition cameras now? They can ID you by your face! Unless you want to wear a full coverage helmet with the tinted shield down everywhere you walk, they're going to find out where you are anyway! :)

Alexander Mark: Thanks! I have long put off writing a Hub about immediately repealing seat belt and motorcycle helmet laws, so I'm completely with you about motoring freedom. My solution to seat belts and helmets is simple: The government has no right legislating what I do TO MYSELF without affecting anyone else. Any motorist who wants to have a sticker on their license plate which demonstrates they don't have to wear seat belt or helmet simply has to pay into an insurance fund which is keyed into the neutralizing the excess costs on society of scraping their brains off their dashboards or the asphalt. There has never been a statistic to prove that motorists who were not wearing seat belts or helmets have a greater accident rate which hurt OTHER people.

However, the GPS ISA does fall squarely into the proper legislative spectrum as it IS the government's job to keep citizens safe FROM OTHER CITIZENS. First Amendment rights do not extend to "yelling FIRE in a crowded theater." Excessive speed is a leading killer of completely innocent men, women and children. That is why I have to disagree with your very well written Hub as I truly believe that GPS ISA with my algorithm implemented is the correct answer to the carnage.

Aya Katz: My pleasure, my friend. Thanks for your continuing support!


ocbill profile image

ocbill 7 years ago from hopefully somewhere peaceful and nice

too much technology is not always a good thing. technology to save lives is a good things and I wonder why I don't notice it more often.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

There is far too much technology that does nothing but rot our brains in this day and age. It is high time that the tech be applied to something truly ethical and worthwhile, like saving innocent lives from being snuffed prematurely!


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

I was going to write a hub on this, and may be I will eventually, but so far it does not go out for some reason. :)

Yes, I spent two days in Fairfax county jail about a year ago for driving twice the speed limit :D


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Two days? Dude, I would have given you life imprisonment on a rock-breaking chain gang with regular floggings and daily cleaning out of latrines with your tongue! (Oh ok... just kiddin'... but it is a serious offense...)


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

LOL Hal, next time I'll try to avoid having you as a judge :P

Aya, I do agree that there is a difference between an arbitrary speed limit and a fundamental agreements on a side of the road to drive on or a right of way. Still, I don't really see any need in enforcing those rules unless their breakage leads to an accident. :)


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

I've often wondered what would happen if I ever got called in for jury duty and faced the qualifying questions from the attorneys. My reply would almost always be:

"If he/she's been dragged in here it means that they're guilty as hell and anything short of the death penalty is barely adequate for their crimes! Lock 'em up and throw away the key!"

At least that would get me out of jury duty... :)


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

LOL You are hilarious Hal! :)


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Oh yeah, buddy? Let's see how hilarious you think I am when you're breakin' rocks in 100+ F degree sun dragging a big metal ball chained to your leg! (... you know I'm just kiddin' and I always have the most profound respect for you) :)


Jellyrug profile image

Jellyrug 7 years ago from AR USA

Hello Hal

This is your "unwashed speed-addled wanker moron" checking in.

Big smile today for two reasons:

1.) Just got a real low insurance rate with a BIG company on my Busa. Their stats show the average rider around 40 years old with a lot more responsibility than the average crotch rocket rider. Few Busa accidents, so they are smart and making money by attracting lower risk clients from the competition.

2.) I find your new hub hilarious! ABS brakes are intended for the driver who does not possess expert alert motorized skills. Now you are promoting a device for someone suffering so badly in the hand, foot and eye co-ordination department that the driver needs a device to keep him within the legal speed restriction. Perhaps one day when I suffer from Alzheimer's I may need one of these, but then they should not allow me to drive anyway.

Ever heard of cruise control?

Suggest you start a new website about this device and name it www.toomuchtimeonmyhands.com

Have to run, having withdrawel symptoms, must go ride my Busa.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Hi, "unwashed speed-addled wanker moron"! I thought I smelled rotten jelly around here! :)

What rate you got from an insurance company that is being underwritten by the $180 billion of taxpayer's money donated by President ObaMarx to AIG is irrelevant. It's obvious that the logic of free market economics went out the window on Jan. 20, 2009, so under the new "bleed the middle class until they're dead" policies of the US government now everyone has access to everything, since the middle class sucker taxpayers are paying through the snout for it. Good for you for finding an insurance company that sucks from the public teat! Keep up the good work and soon we will all be standing in line for five hours for loaves of bread OR soap OR milk... just like in the good ol' Iron Curtain days: The days of the United Socialist States of America are near! :(

I'm glad you found entertainment here. I aim to please! :)

Cruise control is a joke. It's only for wide open highways and then only ones that are as flat as pancakes. There's a road near my house that is a relatively gentle incline. If I go down it with my cruise set at 60 kph (37 mph) which is the posted limit, by the time I reach the bottom I'm at over 100 kph (60 mph). GPS ISA would resolve that problem as well as assure that speed limits were adhered to universally.

Actually, I wouldn't allow you to drive now let alone when you're older, as you've made it quite clear in other comments that you promote exploring the higher reaches of your Busa's speedo on public roads. So maybe the "breakin' rocks in 100+ F degree sun dragging a big metal ball chained to your leg" should have been directed to you and not my good friend Misha! :)

May your Busa seize at redline in sixth! (... of course not injuring you... we would never want that... ) :)


Alexander Mark profile image

Alexander Mark 7 years ago from beautiful, rainy, green Portland, Oregon

Thanks for checking out my hub and the compliment. Gypsy made the same assertion that reckless driving / riding hurts others as well. We won't agree on fundamental rights versus government control, however, I think I can compromise. Why not include a button that completely disengages the ISA, but also sends a message to big brother and includes a very heavy fine unless you can talk your way out of it? We would probably find that almost all drivers will never feel the need to circumvent the well-thought-out passing and speeding limits included in the system, but gives us the ability to override the computer if we really feel it's necessary. Computers are not always right, ever talk to one of those maddening automated voices on the phone? Does your home pc always do what you want it to? That's why I'm glad we have CTRL ALT DELETE, and we ought to have something similar for the ISA.

I like your solution to the helmet law, because if there is a concern about who pays for cleaning the streets of gray matter, then your suggestion places the burden on those who are willing to pay for it.

You're a sensible soul and I love reading these comments.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Thank you so much for the kind words, Alexander Mark. Much appreciated. I'm sure that a temporary override which would incur a financial or points deduction (unless appealed) could be a mechanism that could be implemented successfully. That is a very good point and a worthy addition to the algorithm. Can we just please exclude Jellyrug from that override? I want to see him ride his Busa across the country in second gear! :)


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

Alexander (and Hal), if you really run into a need of disabling this device when driving, I bet you won't have time to look for disable button. :)


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Misha, the disable could be a button next to the cruise on the steering wheel. I don't think that it should bear a financial penalty because if we set, say, $10 for every use, it would hit lower income drivers much harder than millionaires who could just afford to duct tape it down. Maybe allow each individual a five minute override a week and then a point from the license after that?

Actually, that five minute per week override could easily be built into the algorithm... hmm...


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

No Hal, I think you missed my point :)

If you really are in a need of disabling this device, it means you are already in a critical situation and you don't have enough time! Hence the need for higher speed.

But trying to recall where rarely used button is located will take several seconds at least. Your example of cruise control is perfect! I rarely use it, and every time when I do I have to take my eyes off the road and actually read which button is which...


jason1701 profile image

jason1701 7 years ago

for every jellyrug theirs a jason1701, I admire your patients Hal. From what you've said, I wouldn't even notice I had this device fitted in my Busa! Unless Im a Jellybellyrugmuncher!


debris profile image

debris 7 years ago from Florida

Hey Hal,

One aspect that people forget about when they say "I've got nothing to hide" is that what if what you're doing BECOMES illegal?  Recently in the USA, a senator proposed a bill that would officially make any critical posts or comments on the internet illegal.  The wording in the bill was so wide ranging that if you ever made any kind of snide remark towards someone you could get tangled up in a whole legal situation (even some of your hubs and comments could have been in question under this law!).  It would have been far more strict than the law you cite in your hub about death threats.

Luckily enough senators had enough sense to send it back.  But everday, senators are proposing bills that would make things that WERE legal, illegal. This is why I'm wary of laws that allow such close surveillance.  What if my conversation where I say that congress is acting ridiculously USED to be legal, but is no longer.  Then I'm a criminal by their book.  That's why I'm always careful to use the defense of "I have nothing to hide" because I never know if what I don't have to hide, will become something that I do have to hide.

-Debris


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Misha: Yes, I see what you're saying about a button creating a distraction which in a critical situation where you need a burst of speed could cause an accident. That's why I was musing about the override being built into the algorithm itself:

#1) 10% for a period greater than two minutes, but this level is limited to one use every three minutes, and only sixteen uses per 24 hours or 100 miles (160 km) whichever comes first.

#2) 20% for a period greater than 45 seconds, but this level is limited to one use every four minutes, and only eight uses per 24 hours or 100 miles (160 km) whichever comes first.

#3) 50% for a period greater than 20 seconds, but this level is limited to one use every eight minutes, and only four uses per 24 hours or 100 miles (160 km) whichever comes first.

#4) Unlimited for a period greater than 20 seconds, but this level is limited to one use per week or 500 miles (800 km) whichever comes first. Acceleration limitation also lifted in this instance.

Let's take an example. A good, solid, intelligent, mature rider such as jason1701 is happily riding his Hayabusa on a windy mountain road with a 60 mph limit. All of a sudden he sees an emergency situation ahead which calls for a massive burst of speed. He nails the throttle and the Busa takes off at 7 or 8 meters per second squared and the GPS ISA lets him under condition #4. The Busa can do 60 mph to 180 mph in less than 13 seconds and if my good friend jason1701 has zapped his TRE, he's well on the way to 256 mph. In the 20 seconds allocated he is about a mile away from where he nailed the throttle which puts him safely out of the way of anything but a major earthquake. After 20 seconds the GPS ISA transitions to #3 and starts gently dropping his speed down to 90 mph (not a sudden braking... just a mild deceleration all the way down) however, as soon as his speed drops below 90 mph, he can use up one of his other #3s (since the #4 does not count as a #3) and keep at 90 mph for another 20 seconds, getting him about another mile down the road. By now the #2 will kick in and he'll decelerate to 72 mph, and so on. I doubt that there is anything on the road, including a gasoline tanker explosion that will require that much distance to be gained in a hurry to stay safe! Well... ok... a nuclear explosion... maybe. But I doubt that a 0 - 180 mph time of 15.6 seconds is going to stay away from a nuclear shockwave! :)

jason1701: Yes, I have fallen into the habit of using you as a prototype for the mature hyperbike rider, and my confidence in you is well placed!

debris: As you know by my other Hubs, I am a very vocal critic of the slide towards Marxist totalitarianism that the USA is currenly experiencing. I have long maintained that Americans better wake up right now and smell the CommieCoffee and retake their country from the collectivist forces before it's too late. Part and parcel of this "legal revolution" has to be to forever prohibit legislation that violates the constitutional rights of the citizens of the United States. Since privacy is such an overwhelming aspect of constitutional rights, citizens have to stand up against the wholesale trashing of the constitution. The main reason that idiotic bill never went anywhere is because as drafted it was a violation of the First Amendment. The laws on the books are very clear and all we need to do is to apply them. Critical posts are the same as a critical newspaper editorial. If you can't prosecute one you can't prosecute another. However, as you know, I have been the subject of clear, unambiguous death threats from several online sources. Uttering a death threat is a felony, whether in person, in the mail, or on a forum, and has to be treated the same by the law enforcement authorities.

The citizens of the United States of America have a right to live in freedom and liberty. Right now is the very last chance they have to restore free enterprise and constitutional rights before the current Administration demolishes it all.


debris profile image

debris 7 years ago from Florida

Hal,

You're quickly becoming my favorite author online and offline considered. I don't think I could've worded that better myself sir! Believe me, I'm trying hard to wake people up. That is what orginally prompted me to start hubbing on here. I want to share my survival skills with people in the event revolution or an all out currency collapse occurs.

-Debris


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Thank you, debris. That was a great compliment and I truly do appreciate it. You might want to check out my series of Hubs:

http://hubpages.com/politics/Surviving-A-Global-De...

If Americans believe that the worst is behind them just because the Dow dipped to 6500 and is up 2000 points, they are sadly mistaken. This was a prototypical bear rally and the worst hasn't even begun yet. May the deities of all world religions save us all! :(


debris profile image

debris 7 years ago from Florida

Hal,

Agreed, anybody with a fundamental understanding of economics (beyond keynesian models, LOL) can tell that there is a lot of trouble up the road! There's no mistaking that the worst is still ahead of us. I'll be sure to check out your hub above.

-Debris


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Thanks! I look forward to your comments on that Hub. We should get back to vroom vroom here though! :)

What's the most dangerous part on a motorcycle?

The nut that connects the seat to the handlebar.

:)


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

Hal, what if being a bonehead the rider/driver used all his options already? And boneheads are exactly the target of your proposal.

So yes, he is a bonehead, yet accident would happen because your system does not let him to get out of a dangerous situation. Do you see a potential here? ;)

Also, a good part of my life I spent writing computer programs. My not-so-short experience in this area tells me there is ALWAYS something that has not been accounted for even after the most rigorous development and testing...


Hope Alexander profile image

Hope Alexander 7 years ago

I would like to apologize for this comment in advance.

Won't evolution eventually take care of this issue?


debris profile image

debris 7 years ago from Florida

Hal,

Lol, sorry about hijacking the comments :) Are there any statistics about deaths on individual bike models? That might help to make your case slightly more.

-Debris


Misha profile image

Misha 7 years ago from DC Area

LOL Hope, it definitely will, both of bonehead riders and complacent family car drivers.

Are you following me in return or you just adore Hal as I do? :)


Alexander Mark profile image

Alexander Mark 7 years ago from beautiful, rainy, green Portland, Oregon

I have to emphasize Misha's point about programming never being able to account for every eventuality, that's why there should be a big red OFF button on the control device. I don't propose a tiny fine for using it, but a huge one, maybe proportionate to the price of the vehicle to try and get around the varying amounts in individual bank accounts?

In any case, we can use jail time, money and points as a deterrent. The main point is that the driver has the final say and if the reason is good enough, there doesn't have to be a penalty. I don't want some computer telling me when to throttle back even if I'm not at a safe distance. If you program an algorithm to allow for that situation, it still does not give the driver the ability to make the final judgment.  Oh well, back to the drawing board then :-)


BuzzWorthy profile image

BuzzWorthy 7 years ago

Is that a sportbike in that red car???


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Misha: You are of course correct, and although I can't possibly imagine what emergency other than running away from police cruisers after knocking over a bank will require speeds of no less than 90 mph and as high as 256 mph for a period of 40 full seconds, yes, we can most certainly consider incorporating, as Alexander Mark states "a big red OFF button" and let the whopping sanctions try to convince motorists to not use it!

And I adore you too in the straightest most platonic heterosexual way possible! :)

Hope Alexander: You would think so, but since it seems that there are elevated levels of the chemical hyperspeedilene in the water of many North American city systems, they just keep budding up as fast or faster than they off themselves. Actually I have long wanted to write a Motorcycle Darwin Awards Hub showing photos of all the crazy ways that high speed motorcyclists have devised to splat themselves. The reason I haven't done that yet is because there are so many, and I really want to make it comprehensive and definitive. :)

debris: No problem at all, as I truly appreciate your input.

http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/810834.PDF

Has some truly eye opening crash stats, but it does not break down actual motorcycle models as the Feds don't necessarily break it down to models but only list them as sportsbikes, etc. We can only go on the Progressive Insurance survey at

http://newsroom.progressive.com/2005/June/motorcyc...

which shows only the five most crashed models:

1.Suzuki GSX-R Series

2.Kawasaki Ninja Series

3.Suzuki TLR

4.Yamaha YZF Series

5.Honda CBR Series

(all hyperbikes)

and the five least crashed models:

1.Yamaha Virago Series

2.Honda Rebel Series

3.Suzuki Savage

4.Harley-Davidson FXR

5.BMW R1200C

(all fairly mild, lower speed, lower acceleration bikes... with the possible exception being the BMW R1200C which is still a cruiser and not a superbike by any stretch of the imagination).

Also note that the FXR was my last Harley... sigh... I miss her sooooo much... boo hoo.... :(

I've made a formal request to Progressive for a complete listing of their full stats but I haven't received a reply yet. I will post a Hub with all the info if they provide me the data!

Alexander Mark: Yes, I can agree. A BIG RED OFF BUTTON followed by a whopper of a sanction it is! :)

Over and above the algorithm as currently amended, it seems like THE SOLUTION! Yippeeeeee! :)

BuzzWorthy: The story behind the crash is:

The Swedish Police and Road Safety Department displayed the wreckage of this car-motorcycle collision at the Stockholm Motorcycle Fair. The rider, who had recently obtained his license, was estimated to be going 155 mph (250 kph) when he hit the car, which was moving slowly through an intersection. The rider never had time to react at all at that speed. The impact flipped the car and threw it 10 feet from the point of impact. The rider and both occupants of the car, all dead, were found in the car.

Although I'm sure that some eagle eyed sportsbike enthusiast will be able to absolutely accurately identify the motorcycle, it's a late '80s Honda VFR750R, an RC30 race replica superbike, although I'm questioning the three spoked wheel which could indicate a slightly different model such as an NC30. Regardless, the answer to your question would be yes.

To interest only to retentive motorcycle nerds like me is that if the bike is an NC30, their top end is usually around 130 mph (210 kph) so unless it was heavily massaged it couldn't reach the speed the Swedish police stated it was traveling at. However, it could be an RC45 in which case it could easily reach the 155 mph level. So, eagle eyed sportsbike lovers... which one is it?


jason1701 profile image

jason1701 7 years ago

I would absolutely love cruisecontrol on my Busa! Hals proposal would make it easier coz I can get an end bar on ebay which locks the throttle on (but it doesn't regulate the speed thow) which is where the ISA device would be very handy.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Those throttle locks can be absolutely disastrous so you're wise to stay away from them. Maybe you should start a new group: HAYABUSA RIDERS FOR SPEED CONTROL! :)


Jellyrug profile image

Jellyrug 7 years ago from AR USA

So, once we achieve sub-conscious regulatory speed behavior using automatic electronic potential, integral and derivative loops, encompassing algorithms with intricate gain settings, how do we reduce pure stupidity?

Linky:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t77_Ka4rTWk


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Jelly, that rider was SO FRIGGIN' LUCKY to not have been half a second early or that red car would have flattened him like a pancake. I don't know what you're trying to say with that video link, since it plays right into what I've been saying in several other Hubs: That idiot was riding a Hayabusa, although at the speed he was going at the time of the crash, he could have been on a Honda CBR125! He would have crashed just the same. The answer to pure stupidity is to drastically increase the difficulty of getting licensed to ride on public roads, with a Draconian graduated system of licensing and mandatory long-term rider training.


Jellyrug profile image

Jellyrug 7 years ago from AR USA

Agree, he is very fortunate indeed to be alive today. What I'm trying to say with the video link is that no matter what legal restrictions are imposed, there are always the small 5% group who will endanger the system with irresponsible radical behavior. Don't think one can eliminate this kind of behavior with training, or licensing, it is part of the person's character. You talk about your "young days" you think training or increased difficulty to obtain a license would have made a difference? How about stricter legal punitive measures, with a thorough synopsis of each accident, followed by permanent suspension of a drivers license where applicable?


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Jelly, I've been completely honest about my street riding past and how I am absolutely amazed at the fact that I'm still alive. By any statistical right I should have croaked in my early 20s.

1) I spent years commuting on packed California highways by splitting lanes at 60 mph or more.

2) I rode coast to coast on several occasions at breakneck speeds, usually with the throttle to the stop on Gold Wings, Voyagers, Electra Glides, etc. It was especially crazy on an FJ1100.

3) I'd spend the weekends riding through the west coast mountains racing other bikes at about 9/10s track speed. (I once had a guy on a Suzuki 1100 fly off the road right in front of me and down a canyon... he died instantly.)

4) I got so many speeding tickets that my license got suspended countless times... which of course didn't stop me riding.

5) I even got stopped by cops while wheelying and standing on the saddle!

However, note that I never received any training of any kind, and getting a motorcycle license at that time required little more than doing a slalom through spaced out pylons and answering a short written test that my cat could passed. I completely agree that no amount of legislation could have stopped me from being AN IDIOT and endangering myself and those around me. Your "stricter legal punitive measures, with a thorough synopsis of each accident, followed by permanent suspension of a drivers license where applicable" sound fine to me, but keep in mind that it is only an after the fact palliative. It's not going to help the poor souls who get in the way of maniacs LIKE I WAS and lose their lives before the punitive measures come into effect. However, I certainly appreciate that a dyed in the wool hyperbiker like you can come to the table and offer up reasonable alternatives, so I respect you for that.


Jellyrug profile image

Jellyrug 7 years ago from AR USA

Hal, that's a nice post, I just rev things up now and then, after all what is life without a bit of fun? :-)

Not a spring chicken here, stopped riding in 1976, maintained bicycle racing though until this day. I have lost two best friends with motorcycle accidents, one hit a deer, the other was taken out by a car in an intersection, way back then. So, I sold and stopped riding. 1979 I lost my best friend in a bicycle track racing event, happened right in front of me. I stopped riding for two years, however a couch potato and me did not get along, so I started cycle racing as an amateur again, and today as a veteran.

It took a lot of convincing to wifey and I started riding motorcycles again last year, first a Husky TE610ie to enjoy nature and the woods in Arkansas and then the Busa six months later, mainly because I enjoy the technology. I use to be an Automotive Engineer for Mercedes Benz way back and love nice toys, even if it means I just sit and look at them.

You are right, a modern liter bike, or a Busa for that matter is an absolute suicide machine in the wrong hands and unfortunately there are many wrong hands around. The solution to this problem can certainly spark varied view points with heated debates. Me, all I can say is what other people do with their lives is none of my business.

Here in the US there is a very big dedicated Hayabusa organization, at www.hayabusa.org and I must say they are a nice crowd. Very different from the ordinary bike club, mostly responsible technical guys who treasure the technology, decent people and a nice family to be a part of. Were it not for them, I would probably not be riding a Busa.

Sorry for hijacking your thread, so let's get back to the subject of your hub.

The speed controls on both my vehicles work reasonably well, one is a 2006, the other a 2009. The auto transmission actually changes down, allowing engine braking in an attempt to maintain set speed. But let us say I fit them with your new technology and they receive appropriate signals to maintain legal limits. If my "unwashed speed-addled wanker moron" personality kicks in, what stops me from bypassing the system?


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

I fully agree with you (and BTW, that is the most measured and reasonable comment you've posted since we started pingponging months back on other Hubs).

When you state:

"...a modern liter bike, or a Busa for that matter is an absolute suicide machine in the wrong hands and unfortunately there are many wrong hands around. The solution to this problem can certainly spark varied view points with heated debates. Me, all I can say is what other people do with their lives is none of my business."

That is fine and dandy. But that live and let live laissez faire attitude ends about half a second before a hyperbike doing 150 mph runs a red light and into the side of your vehicle. I have no problem at all with anyone offing themselves with their own stupidity: That's Darwinian. I do draw the line at when they take me or my loved ones out.

As for the speed controls, the GPS ISA algorithms as amended through this comment thread allow you to hit the BIG RED OFF BUTTON anytime you want, but face financial or points sanctioning.


Jellyrug profile image

Jellyrug 7 years ago from AR USA

Do you think realistically, it will be possible to gain acceptance through Congress, the Fed, then the individual states and finally 300 milion Americans to regulate their driving this way?

How long do you think such a process will take?

Or, should we spend more time trying to stop the polar ice caps from melting, and use clean energy for transportation?


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Actually, it's already being tested in Britain and Australia and there certainly doesn't seem to be any obstacles to its adoption there. Unlike melting caps and illusory clean energy it's something that is here now and can be implemented with a minimum of drama.


Jellyrug profile image

Jellyrug 7 years ago from AR USA

In Britain, a passenger vehicle is kind of a luxury. Public transportation is so well developed, one might as well sacrifice the luxury if it will be controlled, monitored and regulated to the end's degree. Australia and the US is a very different situation. I can't imagine a US politician daring to propose such a system and surviving the voters roll. I can't even imagine a Brit having the courage to bring this into the house.

Wanna wager a bet, that we won't see this when you hit 90 years old?


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

You've got a bet! Oh, BTW, did I tell you I'm 89 years old? :)


jason1701 profile image

jason1701 7 years ago

JELLYRUG!

The public transport in Britain is useless! Theirs countless news stories of late, dirty and poorly maintained trains! Public transport is the reason I go into biking! I've only got a Busa thru falling in love with biking afer getting a scooter instead of having to use public transport.

A passenger vehicle in Britain is not a luxury, its an essential. People drive around in their nice 'loan financed' cars with only one person in them clogging up the roads while making themselves feel better about it by trying to lagh at me for being wet and cold on a bike the can only dream of! (however I stay dry and snug because of the right gear)

Bileive me, Im British! As a fellow Busa rider I salute you

safe riding.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

jason1701: I lived in London for years and I'm no stranger to the Tube and its "minor delays and problems." What most Americans would be aghast at is the price of the Tube. I had to go to Amersham to see a client quite frequently and the return fare is 14 quid or $24!!! That's twenty four bucks to just sit on one "subway" car for all of 40 minutes. And that's at the much lower exchange rate of today. When I was there, the US dollar equivalent was over $30! Let's not even mention what happens if you want to drive into the City and you have to get whomped for between 8 and 10 pounds congestion charge. Then you can park at a nice, reasonable 30 quid a day. I was making good money when I was in London, and I could have lived very comfortably in North America on it. In England I was a PAUPER! I had to show up at Sainsbury at 6 am to grab whatever they had left over from the previous day and marked down at half price just so I could afford to EAT! That's insane, dudes! :(


jason1701 profile image

jason1701 7 years ago

Yeah! london is a drag like that, being our capital, it is one of the most expensive places in England t live. I live in Dover which is where people catch the boat to France (you probably been there Hal). Theirs no congestion charges and the population dencity is much smaller, but, the public transport is still s#*t!


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

I've spent many an hour waiting at both the Eastern and Western Docks for Ferries that were running behind, so I know your fair city very well! :)


Mighty Mom profile image

Mighty Mom 7 years ago from Where Left is Right, CA

Another interesting and informative hub, Hal. I wish I could be more optimistic about this kind of restriction on drivers. Alas, it is the nature of humans when they get behind the wheel -- even otherwise law-abiding humans -- to break laws. We see it with texting, people holding cell phones to their ears, not wearing seat belts. We see it constantly with traffic infractions from major to minor. There is some psychological phenomenon that seems to take over people when they put their key in the ignition. It's like,"I'm in my own little impenetrable castle that moves. Watch out, world."

I know your topic is a solution to excessive speed. It's not solely the speed, it's the lack of judgment that goes with it. I think a better solution is to make 100% smart cars and motorcycles that relieve the human from having to make judgment calls. The other solution -- and I vaguely remember seeing this somewhere -- is to stop making vehicles out of steel and make them soft so when they touch they don't crunch like a tin can, they gently bounce off the other vehicle.

But in the interim, I'm all for anything that makes the roads safer both for motorcyclists and drivers. Oh yes, and most especially, passengers! MM


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Mighty Mom: Thanks! Just yesterday I was on a long two lane, two way road with a 60 kph (37 mph) speed limit. I had my cruise set at the limit. Double yellow solid line. A Dodge Ram 3500 passed me like I was in reverse and almost had a head-on with a Camry. Many people are idiots when they drive. They lose all sense of mortality. you're absolutely right when you state that: "It's not solely the speed, it's the lack of judgment that goes with it." As for bouncy cars, the problem is that the laws of physics state there is not sufficient crunch zone to create a gentle enough deceleration in a head-on in a normal car no matter what the material. The whole front of the car would have to be made out of a nerf like material and be over 50 feet long! :) But we can hope and pray that something is done to at least slow down the rate of this outrageous carnage! :(


Mighty Mom profile image

Mighty Mom 7 years ago from Where Left is Right, CA

Either that or we can hope that the era of the Jetsons and flying cars is close upon us. Making driving a 3-D operation -- with the ability to move up or down as well as side to side - to avoid a collision might help.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Well, if all flying cars were set up with collision avoidance systems that were fully automatic (unlike jetliners) then there should not be any collisions. But we have to get the flying cars first! :)


Jellyrug profile image

Jellyrug 7 years ago from AR USA

Jason

I use to work for a division of Coca-Cola with corporate office based in Windsor, so I had to visit often. Use to ride only the tube and have fun, could never understand why everyone riding looked so unhappy and serious?

The last time I was in your neck of the woods, was 2003, so maybe things have changed?

Thanks for the salute and take care on that monster, it needs a lot of respect!!


jason1701 profile image

jason1701 7 years ago

A bit quiet on here these days!

Hal! What's the first thing everyone can do to try and impliment this solution?

I as racing alog on my busa at 30mph the other day and got a puncture, that slowed me down! lol.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Yikes. You're lucky you weren't on the M25! I saw a similar situation with a GPZ550 doing about 70 mph near the Dartford tunnel years ago and he did cartwheels. Amazingly he walked away.

The best way to "get this show on the road" would be to:

1) Write your own Hubs about supporting this initiative

2) Write to newspaper letters columns

3) Write your MP/Congressman

Making noise is the best way to get this happening! :)


jason1701 profile image

jason1701 7 years ago

Cool!

I need to make my first hub soon. I think you have this one all wrapped up Hal!


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 7 years ago from Toronto Author

Let me know when you publish it! I'd love to read it and cross promote it from here! :)


Rafael 6 years ago

Why do you think that would reduce the number of accidents?

Dont you know that more than half of the accidents happen close to home at under 30mph?


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 6 years ago from Toronto Author

Ok, let me answer your question with an anecdote.

I'm closing on THREE MILLION KILOMETERS driven and ridden lifetime. My last fender bender (minor sheet metal damage only... no injuries) was when I was 16 years old. I know a lady who basically only drives to the supermarket and to church and who TOTALS an average of THREE CARS A YEAR.

Reducing the number of accidents is easy. Take the licenses away from all the idiots on the road. If it turns out that only a mere fraction of great drivers (LIKE ME) are left on the roads, then that's a POSITIVE!


Anonymous 6 years ago

I have a hard time believing that Hal is being serious about all of this. Obvious troll is being too obvious.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 6 years ago from Toronto Author

Take a hike and take your troll with you. Book your exit trip on travelocity, there's a nice troll gnome there! :P


Anonymous 6 years ago

Absolutely not.


Hal Licino profile image

Hal Licino 6 years ago from Toronto Author

Absolutely yes. Wanna step outside into the cyberalley? :)


from planet earth profile image

from planet earth 5 years ago

Well here are the problems I see with that system. Limiting peoples speed in perfect conditions is dandy. But what about when it is raining or icy. Are we supposed to rely on our common sense then, but not when conditions are perfect and an accident is less likely? I could hold my foot to the floor and my car will take care of me? That is until I am traveling on a wet road.

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