The Ford Mustang GT: Fifty Years Old and Still Kicks Like a Pony

The buildup of the public release of the Ford Mustang in 1964 was like a big tease. Ads appeared all over the place with Mustang, a totally new design that introduced the "Pony" cars of the 1960's. You could get a new one for $2000 and a GT for $3000. The style, even today, is iconic. It is the kind of thing that when you see it once, you know what a Mustang looks like. Through the 60's, the Mustang really evolved in style and eye appeal including muscle. Then, in the 70's Ford was at a loss of what the Mustang should be and look like, producing really ugly versions. The 80's this trend continued and all were putrid.

Ford started revamping the old school Mustang in the 90's, to generations who had little affection for it unless via their parents or grandparents.

The 2013 Mustang GT kicks ass and provides a wallop, just like in the 60's. The front is the iconic Mustang look. Its 302 cubic inch engine V8 is a descendant of the original introduced in 1968. It has 420 hp and a six speed manual transmission. It really hauls- 60 mph in 4.3 seconds for only $40,000. Now, you could spend $190,000 for a Aston Martin DB9 to get a slightly faster car, or, buy a Mustang.

If money and the need for speed are both serious considerations, buy the V6 model with 305 hp for $22,000. It still is faster than many others on the road, but the slick GT model begins at $31,000. On the highway, you can easily race by others at 6000 rpm.

The new Mustang looks more like the older 60's models or late 60's while still looking modern by today's styling. To other "pony cars" include the Camaro and Challenger, both have NOT stayed true to their original design that makes them sought after.

Mustang did. The wild "pony" rides again!

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Comments 2 comments

MG Singh profile image

MG Singh 3 years ago from Singapore

I own one and its a pleasure to drive it. NIce post


perrya profile image

perrya 3 years ago Author

My parents had 65 GT model, very slick car with a 289 engine. That would be worth about $25-30,000 today.

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