Don't Take Your Mom To Job Interviews

This is cute when you are 8, but not so much when you are 24 at a job interview.
This is cute when you are 8, but not so much when you are 24 at a job interview. | Source

Cut the Cord!

I know I've said this before, but obviously this needs to be said again: don't take your Mom to job interviews! In case you are sitting there, reading this mortified in disbelief, let me assure you this is really happening in offices all across America. People are taking their mothers to job interviews.

If you are a teenager reading this, please let me clarify my statement. If you are 13 years old and going for your first babysitting job, it is OK for your mother to accompany you to your "interview." If you are 16 years old and Mom insists on driving you to your McDonald's job interview, I can let that slide, too. However, if you are a 24 year old college graduate going for an office interview, it is just not acceptable to take your mother to your job interview... unless of course, your mother runs the company. That is a whole other can of worms we are not opening today.

Retail Job Interviews Are No Exception

If you are an adult and capable of working, your mother should not attend your job interview. It is as plain and simple as that. Some people will tell you it is OK for your mother to come along on a job interview for retail. I tend to disagree with this opinion.

I worked as a manager at a store once and I've also worked at numerous retail jobs. Some managers can look past Moms and daughters coming in to turn in job applications together. In most cases, if the manager can find an applicant whose mother does not come in the store, the manager will give the position to that person.

Let's face it, if your mother has to take you places and insists on coming in for job interviews, it makes it seem as if you are not reliable and independent. Even if you are independent, it doesn't come off that way, so no matter what Mom says, don't let her come with you for retail job interviews either. This is especially the case if you are 18 or older. A manager wants to feel comfortable that you can work the cash register without calling your mother for advice.

I Don't Care If You Mom Drove, Leave Her Out Of The Interview

I realize in these tough economic times, not all of us have cars. Perhaps you need to rely on your Mom to drive you to work for a while before you can afford to buy your own car. Trust me, plenty of us have been there and done that. However, your mother needs to stay in the car or go run some errands until the interview is over.

I am not kidding you when I say I've heard from numerous HR workers that adults with college degrees are showing up in suits and ties... and their Mom for job interviews. How can this be? Even if Mom agrees to sit out in the lobby, you've already given the appearance that you can't think on your own. Do you want to know what happens when Mommy Dearest comes along on the job interview? You don't get the job at all.

I've heard stories of mothers asking more questions at the end of the interview process than their adult child actually did during the interview. I've also heard stories about mothers inspecting their child's future possible work area to make sure it is up to par. Don't be that guy! You are not going to get the job and everyone feels sorry for you because your Mom is nuts.

Don't Let Your Mother Make Phone Calls For You

Equally as disturbing as taking your mother to job interviews is the mother that makes professional calls for you. I've personally experienced this one at work quite a bit. I constantly receive calls from mothers asking if we are seeking interns or college grads for positions. The answer is usually "no," but even if the answer were "yes," I need to hear from the applicant, not Mom.

Once I get a call from the mother and not the actual applicant, I assume one of two things: A) the applicant doesn't really want to work at all, but the mother is forcing this person to apply, or B) the applicant is not capable of making his or her own phone calls. Either way, it is clearly going to be a "no way" on our part.

Managers want to hire a person that geniunely wants to work. Even if you don't want to work, and hey, I am with you there, but you have to at least make it seem like you want the job. Also, managers want to hire a person that can think for his or herself. If your mother has to make important calls for you, it pretty much states otherwise.

But What About Dad?

I know you must be thinking, "What is up with this?" How can I just keep bad mouthing overprotective mothers? To be honest, I have never once had a Dad call to find out about a job for his son or daughter. I've never heard of a Dad coming with his child to a job interview. Perhaps fathers do this sometimes, but from the numerous stories I've heard, this is strictly a Mom thing. If I am wrong, please feel free to leave a comment.

For now, I think I've warned the world enough about Moms and how they can make a interview not so great. Just remember Moms of the world, if your adult child asks you to go on a job interview, just say no. And remember all you applicants out there, if your mother is really overprotective, you might need to conveniently forget the date of your job interview and sneak to it. Trust me, you will thank me for this advice later.


Copyright ©2012 Jeannieinabottle

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Comments 30 comments

Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 4 years ago from North America

I remember moms and a few dads accompanying 25-year-olds into job interviews in which I was the interviewer or on the panel of same. I was very polite, but would not discuss the job with the parents and asked them to wait in the lobby area.

After one of the jobs candidates was hired one year, the mom repeatedly called and asked questions about her son's work, benefits, income, etc., etc. Again, I was polite but explained that that info could not be released unless I had a signed statement of permission to do so form the son. He would not sign.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

LOL - well, there is not a button to press for "unbelievable!" I just do not understand the thought process of that mother, bless her heart! Yes, that cord's been attached way to long for sure. Hilarious, but sad too. In His Love, Faith Reaper


TToombs08 profile image

TToombs08 4 years ago from Somewhere between Heaven and Hell without a road map.

Jeannie, great hub! My husband graduated from a technical school a little over a year ago and we saw several "helicopter" moms making lists of all the companies they were going to call, comparing lists with other moms, etc.

I asked my hubby how those kids did in school and he just laughed and shook his head. One mom even came to the school every day to bring lunch with her son. Not a big deal? She lived 30 minutes away and only came to baby sit her precious son at lunch. She also dropped him off every morning and picked him up every evening. I saw her when I was dropping hubby off. At least I had an excuse, we shared a vehicle and I worked 10 minutes away. From what I understand, he still hasn't landed a job. Maybe I'll have hubby send him this hub. :)


fpherj48 profile image

fpherj48 4 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

OMG...jeannie......you absolutely crack me up....this is a winner. I KNOW Moms like the ones you write about. I don't understand why their adult children don't just put their foot down......and tell Mom to butt-out!........Worse than the Job interview "tag-along-Mom," is the Mom who gets all twisted up in her adult child's personal "relationships."

There really should be some LAW against this and I don't know why there isn't. There seems to be a law about every other damned thing!!

Up funny.......and sharing


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

Patty Inglish, MS - Thank you for sharing that information. I am happy to hear there are some dads embarrassing their kids at job interviews, too. After all, being too overprotective shouldn't be left to mothers alone. Shesh, I can't believe the mother kept calling about her son. I'll bet if he has a girlfriend, that mother makes that poor girl's life miserable. Thanks for checking out my hub!

Faith Reaper - I never realized this happened so much until the past year or so, so I understand your disbelief. Constantly making calls for kids are one thing, but going to job interviews is just too much. Thanks for the comment!

TToombs08 - Wow, that is just a whole new level of being overprotective. My mother was overprotective, too, but she did not bring me lunch at college or, for that matter, even set foot on my college campus until I graduated. My mother's rules seemed to be overprotective is OK until the child is an adult... and then just throw that adult out there into the world! Hehehe. I was too stubborn and willful to let my mother control me for too long anyway... these guys need to learn that, too. Gee, wonder why that guy doesn't have a job yet from your husband's school? Something tells me his mom goes to job interviews! Thanks for sharing your story!


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

fpherj48 - You are so right... what I can't imagine is why these adults do not put there foot down and tell their mothers "no!" It is so unhealthy and bad for both parent and child. Thanks so much for checking out my hub, for the vote up, and for sharing!


Alecia Murphy profile image

Alecia Murphy 4 years ago from Wilmington, North Carolina

If I have to have a parent come in to sit during an interview, I need to have my degree revoked. That's beyond overprotective- that's overbearing and hovering. Genius as usual Jeannie!


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

Hahaha... that is a great quote. Chances are, the mother probably wrote all her college kids' essays for them anyway. Thanks so much for the comment.


CarlySullens profile image

CarlySullens 4 years ago from St. Louis, Missouri

What a great and interesting hub. I did not know this was happening. I wonder what kind of rejection letters these candidates receive in the mail. "You are declined for the job because you brought your mom."

I remember that pivotal time in my teens and early 20's. The last person I wanted to be around was my parents. This was me trying to prove my independence.


carol7777 profile image

carol7777 4 years ago from Arizona

I can't imagine mothers going on interviews. I thought this was a joke. My mother never would have even come close to doing this. Very interesting though.. Is mom going in to the interview and praise and beg?


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

CarlySullens - You know what is interesting is it seems like no one will admit that is why the candidate is not getting the job. Even though behind closed doors everyone says the mother being at the interview was a problem, no one usually tells the candidate that is why he was not hired. In general, I think usually the candidate is not great in other ways, too. Thanks for checking out my hub!

carol7777 - Oh no, it is no joke and it is getting out of hand. Normally the mother just asks a lot of nosy questions. I guess she wants to make sure the job is good enough for her child. Thanks for the comment!


donnah75 profile image

donnah75 4 years ago from Upstate New York

I am speechless. I think as an employer I would send a letter to the mom that said, "We might have considered your child, but you were in the way of us seeing his / her qualifications." Maybe then mom would get the picture.


shea duane profile image

shea duane 4 years ago from new jersey

As a college English teacher, I am not allowed by policy to speak to parents. However, I still have moms calling and making all kinds of demands. What I know is that the students whose moms call are the students who will not graduate. Great hub.


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

donnah75 - That sounds like a great idea. It is a touchy subject because these are the very mothers that are willing to do whatever it take for their adult child. I think some Moms never realize the damage they cause. Thanks for the comment!

shea duane - I do remember some of that happening while I was in college. I had friends whose parents would call professors and ask for extensions and that type of thing for their child. I just couldn't imagine that. Thanks for checking out my hub and for the comment!


Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

Glimmer Twin Fan 4 years ago

I'm still shaking my head in disbelief. I can't imagine taking anyone to a job interview and when I worked years ago, I honestly don't know what I would have done if someone had brought their mother or father with them to an interview. As a mother I would never even consider doing this. I remember my mom driving me to my first interview when I was in high school but that was because I did not have my licence yet. She waited in the care. I think she would have laughed at me had I asked her to come with me. Wow what a great and thought provoking hub. I'll be thinking about this all day. Had to share this one too.


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

Thanks so much for sharing my hub! Yes, this has been a hot topic lately at work. I periodically meet with a group of HR professionals at my job and I keep hearing this is happening more and more. I also get calls from mothers asking about getting a job for their 20-something son or daughter. It is crazy! I can totally understand a parent driving a teenager or young adult to a job interview, but not coming in to the office. It is a crazy world out there. Thanks again for checking out my hub and sharing it!


stillwaters707 profile image

stillwaters707 4 years ago from Texas

Yes, helicopter mothers must stop hovering. It does much more harm than good and cripples the child. How will they survive after you're gone? Common sense isn't so common anymore. You gave every good reason for mothers NOT to do this. Thanks for this informative hub.


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

Hopefully some mothers will read this and stop going to job interviews with grown adults. I can see if someone is 14 years old, but 24 years old is ridiculous. If someone is old enough to work, that person is also old enough to go to job interviews alone. Thanks for the comment!


davenmidtown profile image

davenmidtown 4 years ago from Sacramento, California

can you imagine as a spouse what kind of husband or wife that child will grow up to be. Can you imagine how shallow that martial relationship would be or become? Egads... somebody sit that mom down and tell her a few things!!!! excellent hub! Brilliant topic... very well written...


stillwaters707 profile image

stillwaters707 4 years ago from Texas

That creates too needy of a person....unnecessarily high maintenance.


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

davenmidtown - You are exactly right. I've dated some Mama's Boys and nothing good ever comes from it. He is always too needy and scared of this mother. Thanks for checking out my hub!

stillwaters707 - Yes, you are right... I think this is why some people do become high maintenance... and scared of their own shadow! Thanks for the comment!


iguidenetwork profile image

iguidenetwork 4 years ago from Austin, TX

It depends on the person though if he or she still needs a parent in going to job interviews, and they're ok with it. But it would be best if the mother or father is giving only the best of moral support for their children, just that, not meddling too further when their kids are seeking jobs. Great hub all around, nice and interesting. :)


Pinkchic18 profile image

Pinkchic18 4 years ago from Minnesota

Great tips. If this were catered to me, it would be 'don't take your husband to job interviews' - i tend to make him do everything for me ;)


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

iguidenetwork - Hmmm... I would say if an adult needs a parent at the job interview, that person might not be ready for a job. The only exception I would make for an adult in this case is for someone that is handicapped in some way and needs the assistance. Thanks for the comment!

Pinkchic18 - Oh dear. No! Leave your husband at home. Hehe. At least it is better than a parent going with you though. ;-) Thanks for the comment!


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

Hmmm. Wow. I might have to redo the ways this mom operates. Haha!:)


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

Haha... as long as moms stay away from job interviews, it is all good. :-) Thanks for checking out my hub.


Silwen profile image

Silwen 4 years ago from Europe

Interesting hub. But I consider this information strange and funny. I have never heard, that somebody came to his/hers job interview with mom or dad. But it seems that such things happen. It is weird. And I completely agree with you, that this shows person's inability to make decisions on his own.


midget38 profile image

midget38 4 years ago from Singapore

Whoa. Jeannie, in Singapore, things like that sometimes do happen. It comes with parents over-protecting their children....such that they cannot function on their own. So important for them to read this, and I share this hub.


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

I used to never hear about this time of thing either. It seems as if this type of activity has been popping up more and more recently. Parents take their kids to job interviews is just a bad idea and I hope people stop doing it. Thanks for your comment!


Jeannieinabottle profile image

Jeannieinabottle 4 years ago from Baltimore, MD Author

midget38 - It is definitely the overprotective parents doing this type of thing. It is just a shame grown adults don't have the nerve to put their foot down against them. Thanks for the comment and thanks for sharing!

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