Functions of Effective Leadership

What is a leader?


For the purpose of clarity, the word “group” shall be used in this article to represent any collection of individuals gathered for a shared purpose.

From an early age in human development, people have realized it is easier for groups to achieve their objectives than persons acting alone. The results of group activities can be seen everywhere—in fact, it is virtually impossible to ignore the effects group efforts have had on society. Every house built, every car on the road, and even the roads themselves are all examples of group efforts. Individuals gather in cooperative organizations for the purpose of accomplishing common goals in all walks of life. Families, businesses, churches, athletic teams and even social clubs all meet to realize a shared purpose. All groups function differently—some might casually gather for a single meeting and others become powerful, highly structured organizations. Despite the widely diverse reasons to gather and organize, most groups have one thing in common: leadership.


Men and women from all walks of life study and train to become leaders.  From corporate executives to clergy, leadership courses are designed to offer practical training in becoming a leader.  While many courses are practical and worthwhile, too often coaching leadership is tied to a particular field or discipline--coaching situational leadership and coaching leadership are not interchangeable. 


What is a leader?

A leader goes first and leads by example. They have a goal—a “vision” that guides their actions and motivates them to fulfill their purpose. Skillful leaders are adept at articulating their vision and convincing others to support it. When this happens, groups are formed.

Anyone who accepts responsibility for leading a group must adopt a different point of view from those of its members. Members tend to see a group solely from the perspective of their role in it. Leaders must inherently view a group from a different perspective. They must look at the group as a whole.

Leadership is necessary. People have had so many bad experiences with leadership that many believe it an unnecessary burden that restricts rather than encourages progress. Leaders have been equated with authority, arrogance, dishonesty and self-righteousness to the extent that trust is sometimes lost simply by assuming a leadership role. It is often difficult to separate leadership from those who abuse authority, but the assumption that groups are able to successfully function without a leader is flawed. Even in groups where no one is recognized as being in charge, there are still signs of leadership. Leaders might be modest and quiet, but someone is still guiding the group and directing its efforts. If at least two people convene for the purpose of accomplishing something, someone must act in a leadership capacity. It can certainly be acceptable for more than one person to fulfill a leadership role, but one person must assume responsibility for thinking about the group as a whole.


Leadership is important and necessary

The products of group efforts are everywhere
The products of group efforts are everywhere
Leaders must have the ability to articulate a vision
Leaders must have the ability to articulate a vision
If two or more people meet to fulfill a shared purpose, someone must act as a leader
If two or more people meet to fulfill a shared purpose, someone must act as a leader
It may seem naive to believe we can make a difference, but we can all become leaders
It may seem naïve to believe we can make a difference, but we can all become leaders
The ultimate goal of leadership must be to make the world a better place
The ultimate goal of leadership must be to make the world a better place

The functions of leadership


The responsibilities of leadership may vary in detail and emphasis from one group to another, but certain functions can be seen as important in any group, regardless of its size or purpose. These responsibilities will never be listed as essential functions on a job description, but they are vital components of success.

1. To offer a vision and direction. Why is a group’s founder so often its leader, as well? The reason lies in an individual’s ability to articulate a vision. Good leaders draw clarity from confusion and render the complex simple. This ability to see through a morass frequently suggests both a goal and a path toward its fulfillment. The capacity to verbalize this goal rallies others who share their beliefs to join them. (The leader will sometimes become the face and voice of a group and their cause through his/her ability to communicate.)

2. To make decisions in the absence of consensus. No leader can do all the thinking for a group. A wise leader solicits the thinking of as many people as is practical and listens to suggestions (consensus), but someone must take responsibility for problem-solving and reaching decisions. There must be someone authorized to say “the buck stops here. I will decide how we shall proceed.” To properly facilitate this, leadership should be clearly designated. Without designated leaders, difficult decisions will either not be made or they will not be supported.

3. To think about their group on several levels.

1.) They must consider the group as a whole. A group is a different entity than the individuals comprising it, and groups function with different rules than a single person. Leading a group includes the ability to manage a meeting, direct discussions and solicit the participation of all members. It also consists of keeping the “big picture” in view while simultaneously disassembling it into smaller, more manageable goals.

2.) They must consider the strengths and needs of the individuals that comprise their group. This allows leaders to delegate with wisdom (recognizing and fully utilizing a person’s strengths). The skilled leader can motivate the individual and evaluate their progress in achieving team goals. Clear thinking about individuals creates an environment conducive to success.

3.) They must consider both individuals and the group as a whole regarding where they began and where they are, relative to where they wish to be. It is not sufficient to think about a group in a static way. A visionary leader thinks six months, a year or five years into the future.

4. To develop new leaders. It is practical to see everyone as a potential leader and encourage their own ability to lead others. Leadership development is paramount to any group’s success. Coaching, counseling and delegation are all tools that both serve the group and support the development of the individual.


An enjoyment of leadership


The role and function of leadership in our society is often debated. Political parties are at odds about the extent to which leaders should be able to shape our lives. We frequently witness acts of oppression and a betrayal of trust from men and women placed in positions of authority. We sadly view past and current leaders with suspicion and hostility.

The functions of leadership mentioned in this article are not the sole responsibilities of a leader. They are only the broadest of brush strokes used in painting a picture of what genuine leadership can be. They are discussed because they represent a rational and evolving model of supportive guidance in a group structure—which is what true leadership is meant to be.

Regardless of whether one is labeled a president, manager, supervisor, coordinator, director, or “boss,” a leader must master the four qualities listed here. Pay, job description, the size of the group and its purpose are irrelevant to the overriding functions of a strong and purposeful leader. If everyone embraces leadership and strives to become a leader, the acts and functions of directing a group toward a common goal doesn’t need to be a stressful, burdensome task borne in hostility and isolation. It can be supportive, rewarding and even enjoyable.

This shift in focus is absolutely necessary to foster effective leadership in the 21st century. It cannot be about power and influence and perks. Leadership cannot embrace a “to have” mentality. Leaders must separate themselves and win the support of their allies through realizing that perks are irrelevant. They must eventually understand that to prioritize “to be” ahead of “to have” is what makes them lead successfully. It’s about the head of a neighborhood association wanting to realize change on a larger scale. It also includes elected officials seeking to make government work for everyone on a national and international level. It means wanting to make the world better and enjoying the process.

It’s about constant change—for the better.


Comments 53 comments

H.C Porter profile image

H.C Porter 6 years ago from Lone Star State

Nice Hub. I agree with everything you have expressed, every group, every organization, every effort that takes more than one-must have someone in a leadership role. I often laugh when people say they wish for anarchy-if they new what true anarchy meant, they would realize that lack of leadership and unorganized agenda's is a recipe for a break down of society, safety and productivity on an enormous scale. You wrote this very well. Rated Up!


Teddletonmr profile image

Teddletonmr 6 years ago from Midwest USA

Mike, I agree with H.C. Porter, your Hub is insightful and to the point. Effective Leadership is what we need now. Thanks to the information, two thumbs up...


jayjay40 profile image

jayjay40 6 years ago from Bristol England

I wish more managers would take on these principles and run things properly. Great advice, well written


pmccray profile image

pmccray 6 years ago from Utah

Mike L; This hub is much needed and has been for a long time. In my years as an "employee" working for large and small entities too many times ego takes place of leadership and common sense. I can count on one hand managers or bosses that I would follow to the end.

I'm not a fan of reality shows, but get a kick out of watching "Undercover Boss". Most CEOs seem to have lost touch with those working under them and have come to some tearful truths while during their stint undercover.

I think most need to get into the trenches and remind themselves of what it's like. I think we'd see better leadership if we went back to starting from the bottom up rather than walking into executive positions from college or family.

Excellent hub, shared and rated up.


Mekenzie profile image

Mekenzie 6 years ago from Michigan

Great points about effective leadership Mike. I agree with pmc about how ego often takes the place of true leadership and common sense. I've had both types of 'people in charge' out in the workplace. I will bend over backwards for a leader with integrity.

I too love the show "Undercover Boss" as it connects those that lead to the worker in the trenches.

Great Job Mike!

Blessings

Mekenzie


JannyC profile image

JannyC 6 years ago

This is something that I think is an underlying concern of late in this world so great hub! This makes you think and I like that.


KelciC 6 years ago

As a former member of the Comics Club on my campus, I can say this much: the leaders of that organization really needed to read this. Maybe then the club wouldn't have disbanded and we would have kept more people in our group.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

HC, thanks for reading. I am always amazed by folks that believe leaders are unnecessary. I am also convinced that even if we (society, business, whatever...) actually had no leaders, someone would rise up and try and take control. Maybe that would be a good thing, but it could also be everyone's worst nightmare. I also share your opinion that society would break down without leadership. Either way, leadership is clearly called for in any group endeavor.

Thanks again for stopping by, HC. I saw you wrote something new also--I will come by soon to read.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Teddletonmr, thanks for your comments. We certainly can use some effective leadership in these trying times. Hopefully things will change for the better for all of us. Take care.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

jayjay, thanks for reading. I wish management and business leaders would learn some true leadership skills, as well. I've worked for some good people, but I've also labored for some of the most arrogant, insufferable bosses ever. When you have a truly humane leader, the difference is crystal clear.

Thanks again for your comments.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

pmccray, thanks for reading. You've hit the nail on the head on some key points. Too many managers are handed their positions, based on "potential," luck, networking, inheriting the family business, or whatever. There are fewer instances than ever of managers earning their stripes and learning to become a leader. And, we all are worse off for it.

I am not a fan of reality shows either, but I kinda like "Undercover Boss" as well. It seems that there is a much-needed reality check for CEOs that comes with getting back on the front ines, and it is fun to watch.

Hopefully the day will come when "boss" and "leader" are a little more synonymous. Thanks again for your comments, they are much appreciated.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Mekenzie, thanks for reading. Undercover Boss has some good moments, and when the light bulb goes on for some of these CEOs, it is interesting to watch.

I have worked for some very good people, but I have also had some absolutely horrible bosses. There was a situation that was so awful, everyone there hated to see the owner walk in the door. This fellow was so arrogant, the process became more important than the result. I know "my way or the highway" is standard practice for a lot of businessmen, but it got so unbelievably bad this man actually preferred to lose money than admit someone else had a sound idea.

My article was written in hopes that someday things will be better.

Thanks so much for your comments.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Janny! Nice to see ya! I agree, leadership is in many ways on trial, especially in the United States. It isn't about Obama--its all parties and all levels, in business and in government. There doesn't seem a way to accomplish anything any more, and it is a tragedy. As I said in response to Mekenzie, I hope that someday things will be better.

Thanks, Janny. I always appreciate seeing you've dropped by.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

KelciC, thanks for reading. I know what you're saying--even campus groups and clubs are in need of learning some leadership skills. In fact, those environments are most in need in lots of ways. One would think folks would see a campus organization as a place to learn some leadership skills, but many believe they already have them and it becomes about ego... and it is a shame. If it was so bad your group disbanded, it sounds like there was some major difficulties!

Well, thanks again for reading, I appreciate your comments a great deal.

Mike


FCEtier profile image

FCEtier 6 years ago from Cold Mountain

Good reading!

Are you a fan of the TV show, "Undercover Boss"? I've long been an advocate of that concept.

Here's the definition of leadership I've always applied to individuals: The ability to change other peoples' attitudes without giving offense or arousing resentment.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

FCEtier, thanks for reading. I have watched "Undercover Boss" off and on--it is a rare reality-type show that I find interesting. I like your definition of leadership, it suggests the type of humane qualities I advocate.

Thanks again.

Mike


catherine74 profile image

catherine74 6 years ago from London

Great article, really goes into the finer points of leadership.


coffeesnob 6 years ago

Mike

This is excellent. I especially like how you expounded on the functions of leadership. I think an area where most leaders fall short is in your third point on thinking about the group on several levels. Often times leaders amy start out leading, i.e. casting a vision; but they end up managing. I believe the difference between leading and managing is that the leader has learned how to pay attention to the group on several levels and then meets them where they are with the intent (vision) of taking them further..

Thanks again..great thoughts and very solid teaching

CS


Lady_E profile image

Lady_E 6 years ago from London, UK

Very interesting Hub. This is one area I have problems in because I don't like to assume a position of leader as I feel it's a burden and you can't please everyone - Bad Mindset. My attitude has always been: I can't be bothered with the hassle.

I have learnt new things from this Hub though and hope to put them to use in Future. Thanks.

Best Wishes.


drbj profile image

drbj 6 years ago from south Florida

In one of your comments, you mentioned your belief that if a group or a team had no effective leader, a leader would "rise up and try to take control."

You are absolutely right. In my coaching work, now and then, I come across a situation exactly like that. A supervisor or manager has a promising team but he or she is a very ineffective or completely "laissez faire" person. Very often when the team members want to get the job done under those circumstances, a "locker-room" leader arises and without the title, leads the group.


Paradise7 profile image

Paradise7 6 years ago from Upstate New York

Great hub. I agree.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Catherine, thanks for reading. I appreciate your interest and your comments.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

coffeesnob, thanks for reading. Your point on the difference between a leader and a manager is outstanding. The difference is pronounced, and often shows itself when a natural leader moves away from the group and on to other matters. Steve Jobs and Apple is a great example. There were many qualified managers that assumed the title of President of the Board and CEO of Apple, but they floundered without their natural leader and resident visionary. When Jobs returned to Apple, they resumed their successful ways. John Sculley and the others were certainly outstanding CEOs, but they weren't the right leaders for Apple--only Steve Jobs was and is.

Thanks again for reading, I appreciate your comments greatly.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Elena, thanks for stopping by. Your views of fulfilling a leadership role are shared by many men and women--for some it is indeed a burden, and the responsibilities of leading others actually interferes with their productivity. I believe we are all natural leaders and can support leadership even if we don't assume the responsibilities of a leader. I would venture a guess that you do this in an outstanding way.

Thanks again for reading, Elena, I always appreciate your comments.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

drbj, thanks for your insights. I have also seen examples of the "locker room" leader. He or she may not have the title, but everyone knows who is really in charge. Those are unfortunate examples of a group dynamic, especially when someone is forced to take charge because the leader doesn't have the skills to direct a group.

Sometimes a person with a vision doesn't know how to lead. These folks are sometimes those that look at a product in a store and say, "I thought of that years ago!" They had the vision but couldn't articulate it. Leaders without vision are managers, an outstanding distinction well-made by coffeesnob in a comment above. The point boils down to the fact that leaders are necessary, and if we don't have them, someone will assume the role.

Thanks again, I appreciate your perspective.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Paradise, thanks for reading. I always appreciate seeing that you have stopped by. Take care.

Mike


Ghost Whisper 77 profile image

Ghost Whisper 77 6 years ago from The U.S. Government protects Nazi War Criminals

Leadership is so important--but only if it is GOOD leadership. If you follow the school yard 'bully' as your leader-- eventually you will see the leader get his lights punched out...and it is usually by the skinny-weak looking kid that has taken enough abuse and comes out fighting....hmmmmm reminds me of something similar...lol


Ghost Whisper 77 profile image

Ghost Whisper 77 6 years ago from The U.S. Government protects Nazi War Criminals

I accidentally overposted--so Ghosty is going to quickly type a hello in for you since I havn't seen or heard from you in awhile.

Hellooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Ghosty! Welcome back! It's nice to see ya again! You are so correct about good leadership--there can be good leaders and unskilled leaders, but there are also BAD leaders. As you suggest, the bully in the schoolyard that rallies others to pick on weaker kids. On a larger and more frightening level, Jim Jones and his People's Temple or David Koresh and the Branch Davidians are examples of leaders articulating a false or dangerous vision while still inspiring others to follow them. These folks knew how to recruit others to their cause, but their cause was deadly. Folks like Jones and Koresh may be leaders in some twisted sense of the word, but madmen should obviously never be followed.

Ghosty, I'm thrilled to find you here "leaving a footprint," as you say. I haven't seen you here among us very often. I have assumed you've been working a lot--I've been trying to get things sorted out and have been here a little less frequently, as well. It's always wonderful to hear from ya!

Hellooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo in return!

Mike


Chandra Susheel profile image

Chandra Susheel 6 years ago

The Hub on leadership is very informative and knowledgable. I immensely enjoyed the whole hub.The categorization of leaders was something very interisting to go through. Thanks a lot for sharing such a wonderful peace of text. I await your future text with great curiosity.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Chandra, thanks so much for reading. I greatly appreciate your gracious comments. Thanks again.

Mike


kimh039 profile image

kimh039 6 years ago

Thanks Mike. Nice hub on leadership. I like shared leadership and participative management; which still require a leader who shares leadership and a leader who encourages participation. I get most annoyed when there is no appointed leader, and the most obnoxious and dominating group member with poor leadership skills appoints himself the leader.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

kimh, thanks for reading. I agree that a designated leader is essential--a dominant personality isn't the same thing, but frequently the one who is biggest or has the loudest voice or is most opinionated becomes leader for all the wrong reasons. I also believe leadership must encourage participation in order to effective represent the group.

Thanks again for your comments, they are greatly appreciated.

Mike


prettydarkhorse profile image

prettydarkhorse 6 years ago from US

Hi Mike,

Making the world a better place -- I like that. And not like Plato who said that leaders whould be the brightest in fact good leaders follow from their followers -- and of course a leader that cares.

Organizations become specialized and of course there is division of labor, and good leaders should have the qualities you just enumerated. I rated this up,

I think you can become a good leader Mike with all the things you have enumerated. I am your first follower, hehe, Maita


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Maita, thanks for your comments. You're correct, Plato blew it. Leaders don't have to be the brightest and most intelligent, but they do have to be passionate and know how to listen.

Thank you, Maita--your comments are gracious and wonderful!

Mike


Business School 6 years ago

Excellent post Hub & comments skills being taught by international business schools include some of the points you've mentioned


hypnodude profile image

hypnodude 6 years ago from Italy

As usual a great hub Mike. This sentence in my opinion summarizes everything "A leader goes first and leads by example." That's why we don't have anymore good leaders around, except maybe one or two. Probably it's a little out of contest but Julius Caesar was one of those leaders, that's why they killed him while he was alone without his soldiers. He lived with them and between them and they wouldn't have allowed him to be killed. Because for his soldiers he was a good leader.

Nowadays how many leaders can say my "soldiers" think I'm a good leader? Not Generals of fellow leaders, but soldiers?

Or how many citizen can say I have a good, not great, leader/government? Or employees on employers?

Rated and stumbled. :)


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Business school, thanks for reading. It is nice to know that there is validation for the points I have made, especially in an international community. I appreciate your comments.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Hypnodude, thanks for your comments. History is not my strongest suit, but I agree that Caesar was a good example of a good leader and well liked and supported by his soldiers. A leader accepted and admired by the soldiers that fight for him is a testament to his leadership qualities and, as you say, probably quite rare in contemporary society. You make a good point in observing that leaders now gain their approval from other leaders as much or more than from their own people--an observation that should be a cause for concern if not an indictment of leaders in general.

Thanks for your comments and, as always, I appreciate your willingness to rate and stumble. Take care, my friend.

Mike


Vicki Parker 6 years ago

I really enjoy your hubs. Thanks for sharing your wisdom. Leadership is important in a marriage too, but how do you get one who is not motivated to take the lead, to do so? Otherwise, you have one person controlling the relationship?


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Vicki, thanks for reading. Your question is a profound one, and not easily answered. Leadership is indeed important in relationships, and I believe a marriage or partnership will erode of one partner or the other places themselves in a passive or subservient role.

I believe we all have leadership potential, and we can all be encouraged to become leaders. If someone is completely unmotivated to display leadership, perhaps it can be encouraged slowly. As I suggested earlier, relationships are typically based upon the idea of an equal partnership, but these are suggestions that might encourage a more equal relationship: Place small decisions in the partner's hands and support the results. Encourage and discuss the big decisions in life, and give credit to the partner for helping to make decisions. Even if the dominant personality is making decisions, ask the partner if the course of action is acceptable. These are small things, but they might help a passive partner assume more of an equal role in a relationship.

Thanks again for reading and for your most thought-provoking question.

Mike


LeanMan profile image

LeanMan 6 years ago from At the Gemba

I just wish that the people that ran some of the business that I have worked within were leaders, this is what is missing in so many business, the people in charge are purely there to enforce processes, corporate views and so on, but do not actually give leadership! A truly successful company needs a leader, without a good leader the company goes no where!


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

LeanMan, thanks for reading. A lack of leadership is a huge problem in business, often because those in charge assume that someone capable of performing tasks is capable of leading others. You're correct, most leaders in business primarily serve to ensure their staff "toes the company line," and they are not actually qualified to do anything more. If business worked to develop true leaders, they would be far better off.

Thanks for reading and leaving a comment.

Mike


Leadership Quality 6 years ago

As the world's leaders as they deal with would not want it. Fully their potential and willingness to work in your life are real and are among the most important qualities of leadership


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Leadership Quality, thanks for stopping by. I am not completely certain what you were explaining in your comment, but I understand and agree that a leader must realize their own potential through hard work to succeed. Thank you for your comments. Take care.

Mike


Ben Zoltak profile image

Ben Zoltak 5 years ago from Lake Mills, Jefferson County, Wisconsin USA

Wow Mike let's hear it for awesome! I have to admit, I was first drawn in by the unique name of this hub blog article: Functions Of Effective Leadership.

I once read a similar Martian diatribe by the moniker called: Modes Of Transparent Fraternization

I kid of course, your words hear are of pure value for those looking at the world of fraternization from the outside in, well done bud.

Ben


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Ben, glad to hear from you. Of course, I knew you and everyone else would be totally captivated by an engaging title such as "Functions of Effective Leadership." I knew you couldn't resist the dramatic possibilities.

In the end, I always appreciate your stopping by and offering a comment or two. Thanks again, and I hope your little guy is doing well these days. He will definitely add new luster to the holiday season. Take care.

Mike


Bilalnr profile image

Bilalnr 5 years ago from Islamabad, Pakistan

very nice hub Mike Lickteig!!!!


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Thank you, Bilalnr. I appreciate your kind words.

Mike


What Is Leadership 5 years ago

Mike,

Thanks for the excellent Hub. I agree 100 percent with point number 4.

Thanks again


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 5 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

What is Leadership, thanks for stopping by and voicing your agreement. I appreciate your comments.

Mike


conradofontanilla profile image

conradofontanilla 4 years ago from Philippines

Leadership involves power which is the ability to attain objectives. It is a quantitative concept. Bertrand Russell classifies power into naked power (use of force); persuasive power(one being used by author of this Hub);executive power (accruing to a position like president of a corporation); priestly power (uses magic and faith) and economic power.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 4 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Conradofontanilla, thanks for your insights. Leadership does indeed involve the use of power in one classification or another. It is important that this power be coupled with wisdom in order to become an effective leader. The exertion of power without a shared vision is oppression.

Thanks again for offering your perspective on the subject, it is greatly appreciated.

Mike

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