Great Summer Camp Jobs Teaching English Abroad

If English is your first language and you want to travel, why not consider summer camp jobs job teaching English abroad? Summer camp jobs for teachers are offered in many countries and they give the graduate valuable work and life experience helping kids to learn English and you can have fun while you’re doing it.

Here is the detailed information to help you secure summer jobs abroad.

Generally, the summer camps abroad are around late June to mid August (depending upon the country).  However, you will need to apply early.  

If you want summer camp jobs teaching English abroad, there are many countries you can choose from such as: Japan, Korea, China, United Kingdom, Poland and Spain to name just a few.

If you would like to inquire about summer jobs abroad in summer camps, first establish what country you would like to visit and explore the opportunities and the immigration requirements. The requirements for this type of work, teaching English abroad are usually (but not always) less stringent for temporary work than if you want to go to work on a fulltime basis.


The summer camps job advertisements will usually specify the experience and nationality requirements of the applicants. This is usually related to the ease with which you can get a visa.

If you already have experience working with children in any capacity then that will be very desirable for summer camps so be sure to mention that in your application.

What Qualifications Will I Need?

Do you need to have any special qualifications to teach English abroad?

Some positions require specific teaching experience but many do not have that restriction. Some require specific English teaching certification such as CELTA or TESOL but many don’t. (However, for teaching English abroad, I highly recommend the CELTA qualification.)

The advertisements will specify the requirements of each of the teaching English summer jobs. The jobs at summer camp teaching English abroad generally specify that:

  • English is your native language,
  • you enjoy working with children,
  • have a degree (the major is not usually that important for these roles),
  • have a clean police record,
  • have a hobby which you can teach the children i.e. photography, boating, swimming, tennis – you get the idea.
  • Physically fit - you will have to work hard to keep up with the kids!
  • Have a great attitude.

Countries and camp recruiters have different requirements which will be outlined in the job advertisements.

While its tempting to think of a summer camp holiday as a vacation, it won't be. Your time will be taken up during the day with English lessons and activities. During the evening you are likely to be involved in helping with additional activities such as helping with a concert performance and more.


Where Can I Look to Get Summer Jobs Abroad?

Here are some of the key sites to search for summer camp jobs for teachers:

Sometimes things go wrong!

Despite trying to cover all eventualities, there will, inevitably still be some things which are lost in translation or an issue with cultural differences.

An example - I accepted a job once and was promised my airfare would be reimbursed on arrival (this was a full time contract). They advised me they would apply for the visa but the application was denied (on appeal it was approved). In the meantime the airfare (which was supposed to be refunded when I arrived) wasn’t reimbursed until everything was in order which was several months after commencing the contract. It was an expensive lesson as I’d secured another job where there weren't visa issues. I lost my $1400.

Another contract specified the airfares would be reimbursed on the day of arrival. Reimbursement happened seven days later but after a tax deduction of 20%. That seven days delay caused some people a lot of stress because they had relied on that money to live on.

The Job Interview

Once you secure an interview for summer camps jobs, you may be interviewed by telephone, probably by SKYPE.

During the job interview, ask many questions. I usually prepare a list and write down the answers I receive for future reference.

Ask where you will be based. Ask about the accommodation. Ask about the hours of work, the pay, the tax deductions and insurance offered. Develop your own list.

Some are paid jobs and some are volunteer so be clear about which category you would like to work and gain experience.

If the position sounds like one you would like, ask for the names of previous teachers so that you can call them to check out some details yourself.

Many positions will be on the basis that you fund your own airfare to the country.


More Helpful Resources

I've discovered this great new resource for those who want to teach English abroad. Although it doesn't relate directly to teaching English abroad at summer camps, it's packed with useful tips.

The guide is published on Click bank and its - teachenglishabroadguide. 

I've read them and I highly recommend them to anyone thinking about embarking on a career in this industry.


Other Information....

Apply early because you will need time to arrange your passport, the visa and obtain any other documentation you may need.

Having said that, sometimes English schools with summer camp jobs are looking for people at short notice so if your passport is up to date, it might be possible to get a job teaching English abroad quickly.

You have a commitment to this process usually you will be expected to pay for your airfare but your costs once you arrive such as accommodation and food will be covered.

Allow some extra for snacks and drinks in the town with your new friends though because the camp food may not suit you.

Have a back up plan and always, always, always have extra money to cover eventualities.

At the end of the experience many teachers spend sometime traveling around the foreign country with their new friends.

What a great way to experience a new country and culture!


For more information

If you would like to read more information about  teaching English abroad, its here.  For information about obtaining a CELTA (certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults) qualification its here in this article.  

And finally.....


This hub is copyright Travelespresso. Please do not copy.

Writers love feedback so please leave a comment, rate it up and/or pass it on.

Thank you.

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Comments 18 comments

Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 5 years ago from North Carolina

Well, I know you and I have talked about my love for teaching at other times. Great hub. I'm bookmarking it. One of these days... Happy Holidays to you and safe travels. :)


travelespresso profile image

travelespresso 5 years ago from Somewhere in this exciting world. Author

Just do it Denise! Thanks for your lovely comment. I've a few more hubs on this topic ready to publish so look out for them in a few days time.

Also those teaching guides I mentioned in this hub are WELL worth purchasing. They'll give you a wealth of information aboout teaching abroad.


china man 5 years ago

Don't tell everyone or they will ALL want to come and take our jobs !! Summer camp jobs are a great way of experiencing any country - with that country's best ambassadors, children. Well put together, and when we have sorted our summer camp here in Guilin China - and know numbers - I will write a hub for anyone who might like to come here to teach for the summer and link it with this one if that is ok with you :)


dallas93444 profile image

dallas93444 5 years ago from Bakersfield, CA

When you teach, you learn. Sounds like fun.


Denise Handlon profile image

Denise Handlon 5 years ago from North Carolina

China man- when you write that hub give me a nudge so I will read it.

TravelEspresso-I will be sure to look you up in the next few days. Thank you, my friend.


travelespresso profile image

travelespresso 5 years ago from Somewhere in this exciting world. Author

That's very funny Chinaman.

I'd recommending taking some time before and/or after doing a summer camp job to see the country. Its a great balance.

Sure, feel free to link to this hub CM. I'll be honored.


travelespresso profile image

travelespresso 5 years ago from Somewhere in this exciting world. Author

DH - You are very welcome. See you on the road sometime!


Edwin Clark profile image

Edwin Clark 5 years ago from Thailand by way of New York

Just what I needed for a few friends interested in teaching English in Thailand. I'll pass on your info to them. Thanks!


travelespresso profile image

travelespresso 5 years ago from Somewhere in this exciting world. Author

Thanks for passing this hub onto your friends EC. Much appreciated and I hope it helps them. There are many jobs in Thailand too.

Thanks for stopping by and commenting.


joy 5 years ago

hi, i just wanna knowif filipino are qualified for this kind of job. I am intereste in working in japan. thanks for the information.God bless you.


danmit profile image

danmit 5 years ago from Moscow, Russia

Very useful links. Thanks


travelespresso profile image

travelespresso 5 years ago from Somewhere in this exciting world. Author

I'm so glad you found the links to be helpful danmit. Thanks for stopping by.


eslinsider 4 years ago

You pretty much need to be in the country already to find work in these camps. Most of them are technically illegal work, so you can get by on a tourist visa and minimal to no qualifications. Degrees are only needed for contracts and long term visas.

http://eslinsider.com/starters-guide


travelespresso profile image

travelespresso 4 years ago from Somewhere in this exciting world. Author

Not at all eslinsider! Many of the jobs require you to go through the proper channels and your status will be legal.

I'm sure there are many opportunities where employers don't go down the official route to help their workers with the appropriate visas but I can assure you, and anyone reading this hub to avoid these jobs as the risks are very high - from a legal viewpoint and possible exploitation. It's not worth it when there are many amazing, legitimate opportunities available.


eslinsider 4 years ago

I have taught English in China, Korea and Taiwan. And I have worked in several different summer and winter camps. All of them did not and could not supply a visa. That is pretty normal. I have seen some summer and winter camp jobs advertised in Korea who will supply a "C4 visa". Which is a temporary work visa. But that is rare.

Most teachers (including myself) don't actually care much about whether it's illegal or not since it is just temporary. But you do technically need a specific visa or permission written into your current visa. That would exclude tourist visas. And for example, in Korea having an E-2 visa from another school doesn't grant you permission to do summer camps. You need to get it written into the visa.

From the schools standpoint it's an awful lot of work and another expense to get the visa. So for most it's not worth getting the proper visa, since the time is so short.

But again not many teachers or schools actually care much about this since it is just temporary work.


travelespresso profile image

travelespresso 4 years ago from Somewhere in this exciting world. Author

Thanks for your comments and experience eslinsider.

I too have worked in summer schools but I had the proper visa. Working in many countries without the correct visa and any other documentation the law deems necessary is commiting an illegal act. The problem with not having a legal status are the consequences if you get caught - probably deportation, a fine and perhaps even being sent to prison. True some countries turn a blind eye to it but it's still rather risky.

Another major issue is that if you're in a country illegally (which working on a visitor visa often is) you will not be covered for medical insurance. That's like playing roulette! Not a risk worth taking in my view.


expatseek profile image

expatseek 3 years ago

There is another job portal in the Asian ESL space: www.expatseek.com


wiserworld profile image

wiserworld 2 months ago

Thanks for the tips. There are plenty of summer jobs and English camps in Korea that open up annually too.

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