High Paying Jobs and No Stress!

Times are tough when it comes to job these days, many people would be glad to take any job that offers decent pay with benefits. However, now is the best time to explore what kind of careers are out there that won't cause you to feel burnt out by the end of the day and be very happy with your paycheck. Yes, I'm talking about a high-paying job without a lot of stress. They do exist. According to a study conducted by Payscale.com there are 24 jobs that offer the lucky worker great pay and low stress. The company surveyed workers and specifically asked them about their stress levels at work and to rate it. Most of the jobs listed require at least a Bachelor's Degree and a specific skill set. Below are the first ten on the list along with the median income and minimum educational requirement.

  1. Biostatistician. Annual Salary: $86,000. Master's Degree
  2. User Experience Designer. Annual Salary: $82,000. Bachelor's Degree
  3. Economist. Annual salary: $78,000. Master's Degree
  4. Software Developer. Annual Salary: $70,000. Bachelor's Degree
  5. Business Analyst (with Information Technology skills). Annual Salary: $69,000. Bachelor's Degree
  6. Physical Therapist. Annual Salary: $69,000. Master's Degree, national exam, and state licensing required.
  7. Mechanical Engineer. Annual Salary: $68,000. Bachelor's Degree
  8. Application Developer. Annual Salary: $67,000. Bachelor's Degree
  9. Corporate Jet Aircraft Pilot. Annual Salary: $64,000. Bachelor's Degree and extensive pilot training and many hours of flight time
  10. Environmental Engineer. Annual Salary: $64,000. Bachelor's Degree

 

Here are the next 14 jobs that are high paying with low stress.

  1. Risk Management Analyst. Annual Salary: $63,000. Bachelor's Degree
  2. Database Analyst. Annual Salary: $60,000. Bachelor's Degree
  3. Contract Specialist. Annual Salary: $60,000. Bachelor's Degree
  4. Financial Analyst. Annual Salary: $59,000. Bachelor's Degree
  5. Urban Planner. Annual Salary: $57,000. Bachelor's Degree
  6. Technical Writer. Annual Salary: $56,000. Bachelor's Degree
  7. Internal Auditor. Annual Salary: $56,000. Bachelor's Degree
  8. Social Media Manager. Annual Salary: $56,000. Bachelor's Degree
  9. Product Analyst. Annual Salary: $56,000. Bachelor's Degree
  10. Geologist. Annual Salary: $54,000. Master's Degree
  11. Transportation Planner. Annual Salary: $52,000. Bachelor's Degree
  12. Data Analyst. Annual Salary: $52,000. Bachelor's Degree
  13. Web Content Editor. Annual Salary: $52,000. Bachelor's Degree
  14. Personal Trainer. Annual Salary: $48,000. Bachelor's Degree

Now many of these jobs need at least a Bachelor's degree just to enter the field. If you are interested in researching any of them, you would want to consult the Occupational Outlook Handbook to give you further information regarding the training and education you need, range of earnings, job prospects, working conditions, and actual job responsibilities. You may find that certain jobs, such as Biostatistician, Economist, Transportation Planner, Urban Planner, Mechanical Engineer, might be found with government, government agencies, or companies who work directly with the government. Others, such Social Media Manager, Financial Analyst, Software Developer can be found with large corporate companies or upstarts. Either way, the Handbook gives you a broad background of the career. To find someone to talk about a particular job, it's always a good idea to look for associations within that field and attend a monthly meeting. Not only do you get to talk to people who directly work in those jobs but you could cultivate a network.

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Comments 18 comments

rmcrayne profile image

rmcrayne 5 years ago from San Antonio Texas

Great topic for a hub Flightkeeper! The folks at payscale.com need to check their data however! I'm an occupational therapist and have worked closely with physical therapists my entire career. I can tell you that PT has been Masters entry level for many years (NO bachelor’s PT programs any more). In fact they have been moving in the direction of DPT (doctoral entry level) for quite a few years. $69K per year is pretty low for PTs.

I wouldn’t say it’s a stress free job either. Most of us are under pressure now for “productivity”. I know a fair few of us that see patients for 8 hrs a day and “volunteer” another couple hours a day for documentation. Most places have timelines you have to meet for new patients (evals must be done w/in 48 hrs etc). That means periods of being swamped. Definitely not stress free.

PT Assistants have associate degrees, and the salaries are pretty good, though not $69K, but stress level is much lower.


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 5 years ago from The East Coast Author

Thanks rm! I've corrected it so that it reflects a minimum of Master's degree as an educational requirement. I thought $69k was pretty low as well, but according to payscale this was the median annual income so it could be that there are a lot of people in other parts of the country where the starting pay is lower, I really don't know. When it comes to stress, it could be on a comparative basis, again on a national level there might be other parts of the country where they are not subject to the pressures as others are. I have the feeling however, that anything in the medical field will become subject to stricter performance levels to satisfy some level of criteria because the entire field is going that way. PT jobs may be low stress in some parts but I can definitely see that changing.


rmcrayne profile image

rmcrayne 5 years ago from San Antonio Texas

Who knows the criteria they used for stress? If they asked about job security, or fear of serious physical injury on the job, etc, then they would have gotten low stress answers.


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 5 years ago from The East Coast Author

Hi rm! In the survey that payscale conducted, the respondents were asked to rate the stress level at their jobs. If at least 40% rated their jobs as "relaxing", "not stressful", or "a little stressful" it was considered a low stress job. I gotta wonder what the percentage was for "high stress" jobs. LOL!


sligobay profile image

sligobay 5 years ago from east of the equator

It would be nice to find a high-paying job, with or without stress. These jobs require degrees which cost more than the annual pay. Paying back college loans is stressful.


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 5 years ago from The East Coast Author

Not necessarily sligo, many state universities have worthwhile degrees in the above fields and in-state tuition is a great value. Having said that, a student must be prepared to make choices when it comes to paying for that degree, including whether they think it's worthwhile to go into debt for that field.


JodiVee profile image

JodiVee 5 years ago

I agree with with sligobay -- debt is stressful, especially when it comes coupled with living expenses and a job (or two). I'm fortunate to have a fairly low-stress job, but I wouldn't say that it's like that _all the time_.


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 5 years ago from The East Coast Author

I think to have a low-stress job half the time is still good.


Time4Travel profile image

Time4Travel 5 years ago from Canada

Deadlines in any job would be stressful, too. But, I agree with you, having a low-stress job at least half the time is good. A positive attitude and doing what you love also make a big difference.


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 5 years ago from The East Coast Author

Time4Travel, that's an important point and one that people don't really connect with is that you have to have a good attitude towards your workplace and if not exactly love it but like it enough so that you're not miserable.


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 5 years ago from The East Coast Author

Time4Travel, that's an important point and one that people don't really connect with is that you have to have a good attitude towards your workplace and if not exactly love it but like it enough so that you're not miserable.


mwatkins profile image

mwatkins 5 years ago from Portland, Oregon & Vancouver BC

This is great info for those people nearing the end of their education, or who have the pre-requisite, basic education requirements out of the way, or are simply changing jobs or looking for career alternatives. Believe it or not, bookkeeping is a great alternative as well. I've had my own bookkeeping company since 1999, and compared to a few full-time jobs I held, it is stress-free! Well done!


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 5 years ago from The East Coast Author

Thanks a great tip! thanks mwatkins.


soaps profile image

soaps 5 years ago

Yes that is a nice tip for people who do not know what to do yet.


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 5 years ago from The East Coast Author

Thanks for visiting, soaps.


Billrrrr profile image

Billrrrr 4 years ago from Cape Cod

I think that most people who have the degrees required for these jobs, already have these jobs. What we need in the United States of North America, is JOBS FOR EVERYONE regardless of their level of education or experience. That means from the ground up we need more jobs in all areas of employment.


Flightkeeper profile image

Flightkeeper 4 years ago from The East Coast Author

Hi Billrrrr, it would be nice if there were jobs for everyone but the challenge has always been matching the the supply with demand.


acliff profile image

acliff 4 years ago from New York City

Great topic - it was great to see all the different career areas and salaries! Thanks!

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