Get Hired: Jobs That Are Tattoo Friendly

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As a larger majority of people possess tattoos today, employers are focusing more on the abilities of a job candidate, but many are still asking them to cover up once hired.
As a larger majority of people possess tattoos today, employers are focusing more on the abilities of a job candidate, but many are still asking them to cover up once hired.


As tattoos become increasingly popular, they are being considered more acceptable in our culture. These permanent markings are still frowned upon by many people and workplaces. There is still hope for those that are job hunting. A good rule of thumb for an interview is to cover them up and then learn about their appearance policy. If hired and you are feeling brave, expose them a little at a time. Even though generally these jobs are becoming more tattoo-friendly, remember that it also depends on in what area the job is located, what each company's values are, and the individual that is in charge of the hiring.


Tattoo artists make an average of $20,000 to $50,000 a year based on experience and the amount of work that's available.
Tattoo artists make an average of $20,000 to $50,000 a year based on experience and the amount of work that's available.

Tattoo Artist


Of course this is the easiest job to have when covered with tattoos. Don't forget that tattoo parlours sometimes also house piercers. In additon, they need people to answer the phones, collect money from the customers, and process their accounts.

Artist


Anyone that is in a creative field with tattoos is usually accepted, because it is understood that they can be used for artistic expression. Types of occupations in this area include sculptors, painters, computer animators, interior designers, and comic illustrators. These jobs or fields provide more freedom to display body art then those that are in the business world.


Matthew Fox played Jack Shepherd in the popular 'Lost' TV series.
Matthew Fox played Jack Shepherd in the popular 'Lost' TV series.

Actor/Actress


Actors and actresses of today continue to succeed despite having several tattoos. Although, they are usually placed where they can be covered up if needed. Some can be used to work into a character's personality. Others just fade into the background as the plot of a movie or series becomes more important then the appearance of one particular character.


Model


If aspiring models really want to be successful, they won't go overboard with their tattoos. Those covered in body art are not marketable. Clothing designers want a model to be a clean slate. Those with tattoos can book some jobs, but they might be fewer, because modeling hopefuls are at the discretion of the designers' personal tastes and visions. They have to find what works for each shoot or fashion show. The best route is to get small tattoos that aren't obscene and can be covered easily by many different types of clothing.


Some restaurant owners may feel that an employee's service skills are more important then minor aspects of his or her appearance.
Some restaurant owners may feel that an employee's service skills are more important then minor aspects of his or her appearance.

Restaurant Worker


You can be a waiter or waitress in some restaurants, but you probably won't work at a high end restaurant. Newer or small downtown joints in large cities might be a smart choice. In particular, cooks have the advantage, because they aren't seen by the public.


Retail


Not all stores allow tattoos to be worn by their employees. Don't expect to work as a sales associate or manager at expensive clothing stores. Those working in warehouses or in the back rooms of stores would have more leeway with showing their body art. As tattoos become more popular, however, some chain stores allow their employees to wear them openly. In my experience, I have learned that Walmart, Target, and various discount or dollar stores generally allow their employees to display them.


Adam Levine, from the band Maroon 5, has several tattoos covering his body.
Adam Levine, from the band Maroon 5, has several tattoos covering his body.

Band Member


Most band members today, including singers and musicians, have tattoos. It is a part of their image and persona when on tour or whenever they are in the public eye. The bad part about this is it's not a job that's financially stable. Many people try to make it as a band member, but few actually achieve success. If you are in a band, then the upside is that it's widely acceptable to display your tattoos with abandon.


Cubicle or Computer Jobs


Some companies might not mind that you have tattoos if you aren't really seen by the public. This can include cubicle office jobs. While it is best to keep them covered when first meeting a company, they may not mind as much after you're hired. Computer or technology-related occupations may be the same way. Working for a social media company like Twitter or Facebook would be great for those with permanent body art. They are always looking for young and talented professionals and wouldn't mind much, because you would be working mostly behind the scenes. Other careers in this field could include tech support, a software developer, or a web designer.


When all else fails, cover them up.
When all else fails, cover them up.

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Comments 358 comments

princesswithapen profile image

princesswithapen 5 years ago

Hi Ebower

Popular labor jobs like construction, building, cleaning, etc are very tattoo friendly too.

Interesting hub! Definitely voted up.

P


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Thanks for the great ideas and thanks for stopping by!


jaredbangerter profile image

jaredbangerter 5 years ago from New York City

Lots of my dream jobs listed here. haha, I never got a tattoo simply cause I thought i'd never get hired if I did. I guess if I am able to make epic enough success for myself on hubpages, I just might. :P

I wasn't aware modeling allowed tattoos, but I guess that makes sense cause they could always photoshop it out. Anyways, great article. :] Voted up and useful.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

That's a good reason not to get a tattoo. I mostly haven't got a tattoo because it's so permanent. Yes, it wouldn't matter then! Models can still get work with tattoos; they just might not be as successful in all aspects. Thanks for reading and voting!


angeladale2 profile image

angeladale2 5 years ago from columbus, ohio

Wow i didn't really know this. I have tattoos myself so thanks.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I'm glad this proved useful for you. I appreciate your feedback, angeladale2!


5 years ago

Not sure about other places but around here it's not unusual for bank workers to have them visible, whether men or women. Does this surprise you? startle you? enocurage you? (etc)

Two cents'


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I am somewhat surprised. Although, every business or company's policy on tattoos is varied. It also depends on where you live and the opinion of each human resources manager. Thanks for adding your two cents, f!


5 years ago

f:

YW. Anyway, wondered if this is a sort of development that you would generally welcome? or maybe you wouldn't. Like, some folk might aspire to have a tasteful tattoo, but might otherwise feel inhibited from a job market point of view. (But what do I know?)


5 years ago

EBower: You mentioned in the Hub the tattoo artist profession first. Is exploring the training/apprenticeship possibilities for this profession something (with your existing interest in fashion and in art, in any case) which you might eventually consider?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

f and F: I believe that tattoos that can be covered are probably the best way to avoid being passed over for a job. Personally, I don't have any tattoos, I don't plan on getting any in the future (due to its permanence and my love of variety), and I can't really see myself in the tatoo artist profession. I do enjoy fashion and art, which sometimes includes appreciating other tattoos, but I would rather have a career in writing as opposed to injecting ink into others. Thanks for your great question!


5 years ago

I see; ty.

Anyway, you must know how you feel; there's an increasing demand for people with flair and skill in tattooing. Often ppl who have experimented in some sorts of piercing, or are considering it, will also develop an interest in the potentials of ink, too (even faith related designs, etc.). But you know your own artistic sensibilities, right?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Honestly, I hadn't really considered it before. Piercing and inking do seem to be linked. Another reason is that my parents don't like tattoos; it would be hard for them if I went into that profession. I'm not sure how to answer that last question. I know what I like in the art world. I can paint, but not very well. I enjoy writing, especially poetry. What exactly do you mean?


5 years ago

EBower: Oh, by artistic sensibilities I just meant, you must know the various art forms that you are good at.

But I guess part of it would also be, can a person, who is already in various ways artistic, conceivably in some circumstances develop different but in some ways related artistic skills as well.

But I realize that, though there might be sound business reasons for developing tattoo and piercing parlor skills for some people, you may have what you regard as overriding reasons to close your mind to the possibility.

I know for example that some folk particularly like to develop the faith related tattoo design potentials, but this might not be an area of your personal appreciation.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

My brother could probably become a very talented tattoo artist if he wanted, because he is able to draw and paint very detailed subjects. I have the creative brain required, but the lack of patience in most art forms. So, because of this reason and because it would offend my parents, I would not seriously consider becoming a tattoo artist. Although, I think it would awesome if many people, especially Christians, would become tattoo artist. They could witness to a lot of people and display their God-given artistic talent on people's bodies. I really enjoy our discussions and you are a very intelligent writer. You should consider joining Hubpages. You would be an asset to our community.


5 years ago

Ty. Re. your brother, interesting he has artistic skills like yours, too. Like, if he has pierced his ears or whatever, he might also eventually get interested in ink, you never know but, then, the family reasons you seem to think would preclude your professional involvement in body art, might also apply to him, I don't know. So anyway you do think there is good scope for ppl to develop the faith related tattoo genre, then? and for folk to 'display their God-given artistic talent on people's bodies'.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

He used to have a piercing in his mouth. He is more independent then I am and would be inclined to 'rebell' so to speak from our family if indeed he did want to become a tattoo artist. Mostly, he is interested in creating and producing music these days, so I don't think he would consider that right now. I definitely think that faith-related tattoo artists could be in high demand in larger cities. A lot of Christian rock band members have tattoos. They are still frowned upon in some Christian circles, but are popular in others.


5 years ago

Oh I see, so he's already experimented with piercing more than you would have, maybe then. Yes, you are right, there is a lot of potential out there, for the right people with faith related tattoo art skills to reach. You're right about their popularity among some Christians and being 'frowned' on by others; I guess from what you say, your skill development choice would be mainly influenced by those who 'frown' on it, then?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Perhaps; I'm not one to make waves. If I knew what God wanted me to do with my life then I would definitely choose that. :) I know that I'm talented in writing, but I'm not sure how to channel it into a career in which I can make money. I can't afford to go to school until I get at least a part-time job also. Being unemployed is not fun, but leads me to trust in God to provide for me.


5 years ago

Well, I see; keep praying and trusting, anyway.

So from what I can understand, your sort of conscientious objection to developing something like tattoo/piercing skills etc would basically be because of other people's conscientious objections, rather than inherently your own. Well, fair enough.

Did you ever check out a local parlor or two? if you did, you might conclusively prove whether or not be the environment for you; or whatever. There's huge business potential out there anyway, but the person needs to be really good at it. (But if it's too 'over the top' for you, fair enough.)


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Thanks for your sincere advice. I visited a few recently. It just doesn't seem like it's for me even if my parents didn't object to it. Thanks for sharing anyway. :)


5 years ago

Oh you went! Bet mom wondered if after all you were going under the needle or not (unless she didn't even know!) Of course you've been an adult for a long time now. They can be interesting resources for the art, anyway.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I had a friend at the time that wanted to get a tattoo, so I went along with her. Yes, I'm 26, so I've been an adult for awhile. I've reassured her many times that I'm not getting a tattoo, because my brothers both have them. I agree; they are definitely fun to look at.


5 years ago

I see, like, to give her moral support as she was done. You seem to have enjoyed being there, anyway. (Some ppl don't like the smell of a parlor; others find it intriguing.)


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

It was definitely interesting and the smell didn't bother me.


5 years ago

Yes, it's basically a very clean smell; cleanliness is a v. important part of a good parlor environment, isn't it.

BTW, you might just find that your mom (whose influence/approval you seem to follow, if I've not misunderstood you, could be a bit more open to the idea of a faith related design, Bible ref., etc.) But you must know. The person getting it has to want it a lot, else there's no point, right.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

My mom and dad do seem to think that the subject of tattoos is important and disapprove a little less of faith-based tattoos. They are from a different generation, so they don't approve of them overall. Yes, each individual would have to want those types of tattoos.


5 years ago

EBower:

I see, so I guess that when your brothers got their tattoos, if any of them were faith-related your mom and dad would have been a bit happier with them, then.


5 years ago

PS: These days it's actually not unusual for moms to swing from disapproval to liking some tattoo designs, to getting one eventually. (But all moms are different, anyway.)


MJFenn profile image

MJFenn 5 years ago

My wife and I were recently given a tattooed figurine by some New Zealand visitors as a memento. It has typical Maori tattoos.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

MJFenn: That's really cool. Thanks for sharing. :)


Hyphenbird profile image

Hyphenbird 5 years ago from America-Broken But Still Beautiful

It seems tattoos are more accepted now, especially if they are not on the face or hands and not hate or curse words. Several young people at my church have tattoos and work in a restaurant. I do think the type makes a difference.


5 years ago

Hyphenbird & Ebowes:

Re. 'Several young people at my church have tattoos and work in a restaurant.'

Yes, it would almost be unusual for a neighborhood restaurant manager to expect the young people s/he hires NOT to have tattoos; at least, some of the young waiters/waitresses might be expected on average to have them.

It would likewise almost be unusual to expect that at least some of the young Christians who take the Bible seriously would NOT want to display a meaningful Bible text reference in a tasteful tattoo.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Hyphenbird: I agree with you. It's definitely become more accepted by our culture and society as a whole. I also think that the type of tattoo makes a difference. Tattoos reflect a person's heart; what they deem important. Tattoos that are obscene or don't reflect intelligence might lend people to pass judgement on people with those kind.

f: That is very true. I'm sure the percentage of people in their 20s or younger with tattoos is high. It's definitely unusual for young Christians as well. Tattoos continue to rise in popularity for everyone.


5 years ago

Ebowes: Re. 'It was definitely interesting and the smell didn't bother me.'

Yes, it is very interesting and absorbing, isn't it?

The smell can in fact prove the seriousness and professionalism of the efforts of the management to keep the parlor clean and sterile. So its unique smell is kind of a point in its favor, I suppose. (Some ppl don't like it, though. Some ppl just don't find it interesting, either.)

Blessings.


5 years ago

'Honestly, I hadn't really considered it before. Piercing and inking do seem to be linked.'

PS: On another hubpage by someone else I saw someone discussing the notional linkages between piercing (specifically, gauging actually) and inking; maybe I should try to dig up the reference?

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I don't actually remember the smell, so I'm at a loss at responding to your comment. lol People that want to look different, to stand out and be noticed, usually want something extreme that could include piercing or tattoos or both. So, it makes sense that they are linked somewhat.


5 years ago

This is from the hub I was referring to; but I'm not sure that gauging would fall under your definition of 'extreme', would it?

http://hubpages.com/style/Cheap-Large-Ear-Gauges-a...

'Although somewhat painful, many people find that gauging their ears is very rewarding. ...In some ways, it is similar to tattooing. For example, one must endure a little pain to reap the benefits of the finished product. Many tattoo lovers also sport ear gauges, and in many areas of the united states and all over the world, the art form of tattooing and the process of ear gauging go hand in hand. People who enjoy one ma.y enjoy the other'.

I don't know how far I would agree with the analysis. But I thought it was interesting, anyway, don't you think?

Whether they are formally linked from an aesthetic point of view, or whether there are simple parallels between two separate forms of enhancement, might be a moot point, I don't know...


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

It probably just depends on the person. Both are considered permanent or semi-permanent modifications. They are linked in the same sort of style, but both are not for everyone.


5 years ago

Yes, it's an individual thing, isn't it.

Was wondering, re. permanent/semi-permanent: do you reckon 2g gauges to be permanent or semi-permanent? (Or stated differently, can someone with 2gs even get his or her old earrings in any more?)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Well, actually I was trying to describe tattoos as permanent and gauges as semi-permanent. If you didn't get too large of a gauges, then I've heard your ears can grow back and it won't look too bad.

I'm not sure exactly what would happen if I took my plugs out and let them grow back again. There's a better chance of them looking okay compared to others with larger gauges, such as 0g or 00g. I'm sure I wouldn't be able to wear earrings until I let it grow completely back and then it might still be risky to pierce them again (at least not in the same exact spot).


5 years ago

Sounds like in your dedication to the (moderately) gauged look, you've effective said bye bye to your old earrings :). (Unless, of course, there are further pierced holes further along the ear.)

But, then, I'm sure you reckon it's well worth it for the sheer classy fun of gauges.

(Did the chain store employers that you mentioned above have any issue with gauges, by the way? you said that in your experience some chains are quite happy for workers to show their tattoos.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I didn't have any issues with the one that I worked at before. Although, it was in a fairly large college town, so the atmosphere is different there then my small town.


5 years ago

Because you were saying, above, about chain store dress codes:

'As tattoos become more popular, however, some chain stores allow their employees to wear them openly. In my experience, I have learned that Walmart, Target, and various discount or dollar stores generally allow their employees to display them.'

I guess that maybe a few of your co-workers had some cool tats? and you consequently think there's no real reason they shouldn't be able to show them?

(Same applies to your gauges, maybe.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, they did and yes, I think they can be appropriate for certain jobs.


ladyhowto4u profile image

ladyhowto4u 5 years ago

Interesting topic! I enjoyed reading your hub about the various professions or jobs that allow tattoos. Thanks for sharing this information!

--ladyhowto4u


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

ladyhowto4u: Your welcome. I enjoyed writing it and I'm glad you found it useful in some way. Thanks for commenting!


5 years ago

Ebower: Yes, it certainly comes across that you enjoyed writing this hub very much. :)

Blessings.


5 years ago

Just wanted to say as well that I noticed and quite like the engaging and warm style of the way you wrote in the section about Band members, above. Referring to having them as being 'a part of their image and persona', you wrote:

'If you are in a band, then the upside is that it's widely acceptable to display your tattoos with abandon.'

Anyhow, the way you express here what you call the 'upside' seems to say it with a certain element of personal empathy and radiance, I think.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Thank you. :) Even though I'm not planning on sporting a tattoo of my own, I feel it is a personal decision for others; I won't judge them based on their tattoos.


5 years ago

YW.

And I'm sure that in 'not planning on sporting' one of your own, your empathy is consistent with keeping an open mind on the matter. :)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

For the most part, yes.


5 years ago

... and it would work the other way, too, of course, wouldn't it:

You would be you, whether or not (hypothetically) you had tats: you would reasonably expect people to treat you the same way, I'm sure. :)

Anyway, you have plenty of sensible thoughts about the matter on this hub article.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Thank you. It's easy for most people to 'judge a book by its cover'. I'm not saying I'm immune, but I'm trying not to.


5 years ago

YW. I reckon that what you've just said sums up part of the challenge and purpose of your article, really, isn't it?

Or to put it in Biblical terms: 'Man looks on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks on the heart'.

I can of course understand the caution with which you write, above: 'If hired and you are feeling brave, expose them a little at a time.'

Maybe this is the way to do it...right?

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, it sums it up quite well I think. Exactly! Correct; sometimes one is treading on thin ice when showing tattoos in certain workplaces.


5 years ago

Seems, then, that really you are advocating a moderate, middle course of cautious defense of tattoos, while at the same time recommending tact, especially for newcomers in some business environments.

For example, if you were newly hired as a business executive you wouldn't want to tread on thin ice, like you say. But in the longer term, a lady wouldn't reasonably expect to have to wear dark nylons, for example, even on Dress Down Fridays. I would hope that personnel depts. would think this made sense.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, that's exactly what I'm trying to explain and the advice I'm offering.


5 years ago

Yes, it's a question of balance and moderation. (To continue the example, the time should reasonably come for lighter, less opaque nylons sometimes.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

True; I don't see many people wearing nylons these days (at least where I am).


5 years ago

Oh I was just giving a hypothetical example, without really spelling it out in full, of the fact that some of the very many ladies with tattooed ankles may of course become business executives. While sometimes nylons, boots, pants, etc (the covering is immaterial) may be worn, whether out of conservatism or tact, yet sooner or later they won't necessarily be expected to hide it, even on casual days. (I guess I was painting with a broad brush; I didn't spell it out; but this was my general idea.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Oh ok; I understand now. Yes, it seems most have to hide them now. Although, more and more people are getting tattoos that they probably won't matter as much soon.


5 years ago

Yes: 'more and more people are getting tattoos that they probably won't matter as much soon.'

What you say is very true and ppl's hesitations and anxieties can increasingly and gently be laid to rest.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

The shocking will become mundane.


5 years ago

Well, yes, in a sense, but it depends what you mean by 'shocking', and to whom. For example, I can't really see a lady such as yourself (just speaking purely hypothetically now) getting her tattoo with a view to setting out to shock people. (More likely as a result of thinking it would be a really benign, aesthetically positive thing with potential for witness conversations.)

So depends on how we define shocking, really.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, well I suppose I meant shocking generally. For instance, when a new trend starts and is brand new. It might be shocking at first until it becomes mainstream and acceptable to most people in the society.


5 years ago

Yes, maybe in a very general sense. But you're not shocked by it, I'm sure. :)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

No, not anymore. Living in a larger city (then where I live now) will expose one to a lot.


5 years ago

This is true :) ! Especially if you appreciate the artwork and notice them more.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Exactly :)


5 years ago

..., which, I think, you do seem to appreciate, quite a lot. :)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, I appreciate some tattoos.


5 years ago

Anyway, I think that it's probably fair to say that you would want and expect your level of appreciation for particular designs to remain constant, before you were ever to participate as a tattooed lady, if I've understood your various comments correctly.

After all, if one's appreciation for a particular design is likely to fade in and fade out, then it would have been better to make sure you really did like the design first. Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, you are correct, sir.


5 years ago

The moral: find a design you really, really like. Which for some ppl means, a favorite Bible ref. that keeps on being your favorite, I reckon. Otherwise, wait ...

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I couldn't have summed it up any better. :)


5 years ago

Well, okay. :)

So you don't have a firmly favorite Bible verse, among the many that you like, I guess.

But, if I haven't misunderstood, it's getting to sound like that, in the right circumstances of being really sure of the right Bible verse/ref., getting a tattoo is something that is quite appealing to you, right?

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I would be appealing to me if it wasn't so permanent. I like variety; probably why I get my hair cut differently so often (and dyed).


5 years ago

Well, I see. (More or less.)

People do regularly touch up their tattoos with extra color.

You must know how your sense of aesthetic priority and faith talking points coalesce with your senses of permanence and variety. :)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, pretty much. Nice sentence and word choice; I had to reread it in order to ascertain its meaning. :)


5 years ago

Well, ty. (blush)

Sorry it wasn't clear at first. What I meant was that you seem to favor a number of important points:

i) you have or need definite ideas about things of spiritual value that you strongly want to communicate; ii) you have a highly developed aesthetic sense; iii) you want to feel that you would later have some latitude in making some color change or enhancement to any existing tattoo that you might acquire.

If all these manage to come together, then, and only then, you will bare to the needle and go for it!

(I hope this makes some more immediate sense, with accuracy.) :)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, apparently you know me well from reading the hubs that I've written. I agree with all you typed. :)


5 years ago

You make me blush again. :)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I guess I'm good at that; haha.


5 years ago

Oh well. :)

Anyway, I'm increasingly sensing that, with ALL the cautionary qualifications, and the firm exercising of your very restrained and sober wisdom in the matter, that has been spelled out: you do look forward one day to the real possibility of going for your first tattoo.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I seriously doubt I'll ever get one, but we'll see!


5 years ago

The appeal, at least, of a first tattoo seems to be there at some level, anyway...


5 years ago

...but I guess I should keep more quiet.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Perhaps; no, never be 'quiet'. I appreciate your comments immensely. :)


5 years ago

(smile)

Oh well.

Preferred placement is part of it, of course.

Blessings.


5 years ago

The placement is strictly separate from the design, of course, but when you start thinking about a preferred design, a preferred placement is often not far behind, either, in one's thinking.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, they are both valid aspects to reflect on before getting a tattoo.


5 years ago

Yes, I'm sure. A case of, We'll see whether... and: We'll see where...

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Exactly! lol


5 years ago

(smile)

A rather personal dilemma and choice that you're facing, right? :)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Lol I've already made my choice.


5 years ago

Already decided? :)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I thought you already knew I wasn't getting a tattoo. lol


5 years ago

Like I said, maybe I should keep quiet...

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I don't mind you discussing it; just don't expect me to get a tattoo. lol


5 years ago

lol, 'expect' is not the right word.

You wrote the article on an interesting tattoo-related subject. You further thoughts on the subject are, too, interesting. :)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Ok; thanks!


5 years ago

In other words, your readers will reasonably assume that you've got a good amount to say and share on the subject :)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Well, that's true!


5 years ago

'Tattoo artists make an average of $20,000 to $50,000 a year based on experience and the amount of work that's available.'

So how would you like to be earning this, doing something that really, really interests you...? :)

Blessings.


5 years ago

PS: This would presumably reflect the earnings of an established artist with a well-built up customer base. It certainly takes a lot of work and confidence-building promotion through reputation from customers for earnings to 'take off', right?

(Anyway, for the hub, in case I haven't already, voted 'up' and 'awesome'.)


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

It doesn't interest me, but thanks for the suggestion. Yes, one would have to have a lot of training and experience. Thank you for voting. :)


5 years ago

YW :)

I guess it interests you enough to write the article, but not enough to train to work in a parlor...

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Exactly! :)


5 years ago

Re-reading your commnent: 'People that want to look different, to stand out and be noticed, usually want something extreme that could include piercing or tattoos or both.'

I think, after all, the inward effect of truth on the heart is far, far more radical than any outward mod, however superficially 'extreme' the outward variety may seem.

It's good to keep things in perspective.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Preach it! lol Yes, I agree whole-heartedly.


5 years ago

The complement at its opposite can be true also: a superficially radical enhancement (by tatting/piercing, etc.) can in reality be gently conventional, contributing to an increasingly mainstream aesthetics.

Blessings.


5 years ago

In keeping with your comment, above: 'As tattoos become increasingly popular, they are being considered more acceptable in our culture'.

Very true!

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, it sounds like we had the same mind-set regarding this issue.


5 years ago

Anyway, I'm sure your mindset includes being thoroughly comfortable with the fact your brothers have tats, right?

(Even if your mom isn't...yet.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, I'm fine with it.


5 years ago

Well, I'm sure you are. (And maybe mom will be too, eventually...)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Perhaps....:)


5 years ago

Well, you guys will have to wait and see whether she does, I guess. You never know...

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Right.


5 years ago

Hyphenbird:

Re-reading your comment: 'Several young people at my church have tattoos and work in a restaurant. I do think the type makes a difference.'

Yes; with regard to the type, I think among some ppl who say are opposed to visible tattoos in the workplace may have been considering some 'worst case scenario' at some time or place, and then, to cover their bases, seem to have lumped together all tattoos everywhere in their dress codes.

Whereas the underlying reality has moved on a very great deal. For example, a young man with high school contemporaries who have become 'Hells Angels', complete with tattoos, may well be an earnest Christian with a sober, Bible verse tattoo, as he wants to join the military. His tattoo might well be vastly different from 'Hell's Angel' ink. Or someone who was a student who got a tasteful, flower tattoo 15 - 20 years ago when she was a student, may well now be a pastor's wife, with a lot of basically conservative tastes otherwise. Or a shy pastor's daughter going to college might gently relish getting inked with a small piece of calligraphy in a short Scripture ref.

So, yes, I think the matter of tattoo type is very significant, with a lot of vastly different variables. A pity if they are sometimes all lumped together in some ppl's minds.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

It's true there are many generalizations for various subjects, including tattoos and the workplace. It's hard to say what is wrong or right until you take into account each manager and each workplace. Also, you have to think about where the workplace is located; what type of city or town. There are many aspects to take into cosideration.


ebower: 5 years ago

Yes, you are right. Like you say (and as the writer of the main hub article, you know quite a lot about it), it's not a matter of right and wrong.

As I may have mentioned before, in my area there are people that are bank workers who have tattoos; obviously, their managers and supervisors recognize that some, non-offensive tattoos can actually be rather widespread and mainstream enhancements.

I thought Hyphenbird's point about tattoo type was very relevant, anyway, don't you think?

Blessings.


5 years ago

Oops, the last comment was by f.

Addressed to ebower.

Sorry.


5 years ago

(Really, really sorry I messed up there; how could I have been so stupid?)


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

You're right. Yes, she made some good points. It's ok; it happens to the best of us.


5 years ago

(You're very patient! Ty.)

Like you say, there are many generalizations. But the whole field of tattoos is so vast and diverse that too much generalization makes no sense whatsoever.

Like you say, there are a lot of things to take into consideration before going under the needle, but also I think that because it's so vast now, tasteful and unobtrusive ones shouldn't be seen as precluding working in lots of areas. (Sense?)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Your welcome; anytime. Coming from a person that's clumsy and makes a few mistakes of her own, I easily forgive. :)

Exactly!

Yes, I see what you mean. They are definitely more accepted today concerning the qualities you mentioned.


5 years ago

Also, part of it is, I think, that the hesitations and suspicions of the older generation which can linger somewhat towards tattoo art, however tasteful, is partly that impressions and assumptions about them may date from a time when tattoos were a whole lot less diversified, and (if can use another term, too) less sanitized.

So like when ppl now express aesthetic appreciation for a tattoo, whether or not communicative of a faith message, they can evoke a reaction among some older people which might be more relevant to more crude work done decades back and with far less positive associations in many cases.

Hyphenbird mentioned somewhere that several young ladies in her church have Bible verse tattoos: this is a case in point as regards the great strides of diversification that have occurred since many of the older generation got their initial impressions, which may have lingered beyond some of their relevance.

Anyway, trying to be constructive with these many and varies aspects that can be discussed, I guess.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, some people from older generations understand tattoos to have a negative connotation: rebel, motorcycle man, 'hooligan', etc. Yes, she gave a good example of how tattoos have been broadened in their spectrum.


5 years ago

Yes, exactly. It was a very good example of their very greatly broadening spectrum.

You refer to a rebel hooligan type of connotation: whatever may have been the case decades ago, but now for serious and godly young ladies with an earnest and deep desire to commit their skin to permanent Bible verse testimony, to be construed as being with a rebel hooligan connotations! it's would be utterly unrealistic and even crazy to equate the two, right?

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Definitely; it's amazing how different tattoos are perceived (by some or most) today.


5 years ago

Indeed, yes. The young ladies with Bible verse tattoos in the example given by Hyphenbird from her church could truly be described as a really eloquent instance of and lesson why the gap which persists with some ppl between the perception and reality of tasteful tattoos, really must change quickly.

Blessings.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, sir. :)


5 years ago

Well, sounds like you really agree, anyway ... (smile)

Blessings.


5 years ago

ladyhowto4u: Re.'Interesting topic! I enjoyed reading your hub about the various professions or jobs that allow tattoos.'

Yes, very interesting, and the list of jobs where they are okay is getting longer.


5 years ago

jaredbangerter: 'I never got a tattoo simply cause I thought i'd never get hired if I did. I guess if I am able to make epic enough success for myself on hubpages, I just might.'

Well, the article does speak about cubicle jobs, which, by their nature don't involve liaising with the public much.

For men, one of the traditional placements is arm (though this is no longer a nearly exclusively male placements); they can always wear a shirt with long sleeves.


5 years ago

Ebowes:

This is part of the wording from Hyphenbird from the other thread: 'I like tattoos and find most of them lovely. Several young girls at church have Bible verses tattooed on them and I think it is an opportunity to witness.'

Would you generally welcome it if several of the younger people from, say, your church decided to witness in this way?

Not that you would want to tell them what to do. What I mean is, whether or not you would go as far as finding them 'lovely' as Hyphenbird put it, would you broadly welcome it in terms of generally contributing to the witnessing environment and to the broader visibility of tasteful inking?

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, I think tattoos with Bible verses could become conversational pieces and hopefully a way for Christians to witness to others.


5 years ago

I see, so if from your church some were already definitely considering Bible verse tattoos, you, too, would encourage them to go for it?

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I would encourage them to do so if they prayed about it and it would not be objectionable to their parents (Exodus 20:12).


5 years ago

I see, ty.

Sounds like the idea and the medium are something you are certainly rather favorable towards, theoretically.

Sounds too that the matter of parental disapproval is a factor which weighs quite heavily with you, hypothetically, at least.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, I do like to please my parents. It is Biblical after all. Tattoos aren't important to me personally, but I appreciate them sometimes on others.


5 years ago

Well, this is good and right.

Of course, you've been an adult for years now. Maybe if later you discerned that your parents had become a bit more favorable to the idea of tasteful witness ink, you might find your perspective would just possibly change a bit too. (But I can't know your parents better than you, or read your thoughts either.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I personally don't like tattoos also, because they are so permanent and I'm afraid I wouldn't like it after awhile or would want to be able to change it.


5 years ago

I guess your favorite Bible verse changes; I see.

Blessings.


5 years ago

I see what you mean also about the permanence aspect. I guess the permanence consideration in bodmod isn't restricted to tattoos. Recently I was reading about ear gauging and the so called 'point of no return'. I guess that the 'magic 0g' both attracts and, because of the possible permanence aspect, repels (I think you're at a 2g, right?). According to what I've read, it's claimed by some that bigger than 2g is the 'point of no return', and therefore permanent. Others even say that for some ppl it is effectively 2g: since there is no guaranty that with plugs removed the holes will ever close up.

So I guess that with regard to the permanence aspect in bodmod you are already right on the verge of having done something permanent, and some ppl would even say that potentially you've already gone over the line (not that it needs to be a matter of regret, if you like your stretchings and plugs).

So I understand your caution about the permanence of tattoos, although in the end they're not dissimilar to some bodmod experience which you just may already have undertaken.

(If this makes any sense?)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I understand your point. Stretching my ears is kind of permanent. I may be wrong, but I believe my ears would grow up okay if I chose to take my plugs out. Honestly, I didn't think about the long term consequences of stretching them. I am glad that I can cover them with my hair when I need to. Tattoos are definitely permanent or would be for someone as poor as me. It would cost too much for me to get them removed! :)


5 years ago

Well, if you started and continued earning maybe you'd be a teeny bit less averse to going under the needle (not that this is what you should do; just talking about the logical and hypothetical side).

But, yes, ear stretching to 2g really is kind of borderline permanent. Re. 'Honestly, I didn't think about the long term consequences of stretching them'; well, don't worry at all: you wouldn't have found it as satisfying to wear fake plugs, would you. But you now have the real thing.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Right; I just wish I had a job right now. lol


5 years ago

And I guess, too, that when you do start earning, something like a tattoo wouldn't probably be way up your list of priorities, either. Just that logically, those with a bit more money can afford to do a bit more long term, 'clear skies' planning.

But, yes, you're in a sense already, at least, obliquely, on the path of bodmod permanence, on the 'first rung', so to speak.

Blessings.


5 years ago

PS: and, like you said on the other thread, 'Any avenue of art should be positive, moral, and filled with love and truth'; so I'm sure it would inform your view of this area, too.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes money and morality are important issues to consider when thinking about getting a tattoo.


5 years ago

Yes, and someone of your gifts and convictions would probably have thoroughly weighed both of those areas before finally choosing a faith design to be tattooed with.

Blessings.


5 years ago

PS: Even for someone already falteringly and slightly embarked on a journey of bodmod permanence, caution and great care in any such plans would be highly appropriate. Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, caution is appropriate indeed.


5 years ago

Yes, and possibly more cautious than you maybe were when you went close to the 'point of no return' with your stretching, right?

(Then, again, for you this was probably all part of the fun, I guess. So there's probably more than one way of looking at it.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I guess it's okay to have some spur-of-the-moment decisions. Although, I did want to gauge my ears for awhile. I would put more thought into getting a tattoo.


5 years ago

Re. your gauging that I understand you did plan for a while, I'm sure you find it rewarding and worthwhile, anyway.

Re. putting thought into the tattoo plan, I'm sure you'd go ahead when (and only when) you similarly are convinced it's rewarding and worthwhile.

(Makes sense, I hope?)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, some days I'm glad I did it; others I'm not quite sure. Yes, I'd have to know I'd like a certain one for a long time.


5 years ago

Well, re. the gauging, the way I would look at it is this: you wanted it for a while, you took the plunge and if you hadn't, presumably you wouldn't have been as satisfied with fake plugs as you now are with the real thing, I reckon. (Make sense so far?)

Re. liking a certain tattoo for a long time, if you liked it (including the faith element) for long enough to take the plunge, part of the subsequent satisfaction would presumably be knowing that you had wanted it and planned it, and, following it through, gone for it. (Make sense, too?)

So I guess this would seem a quite reasonable way of looking at it, anyway. Theoretically, does it seem reasonable to you, too?

Blessings.


5 years ago

PS: so consequently: no need to be worried now about regretting the gauges, which you did plan beforehand; no need to worry either about future regret for any tattoo which will have been planned beforehand.

(Hope it makes some sense.)

Blessings.


5 years ago

(I've been rambling a bit, sorry...)


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

The anticipation of something you want usually is half the fun. I think I understood most of what you said. Sometimes living in the moment is important and not regretting the past also. I still will probably never get a tattoo, but I guess if I wanted one I would just plan for it, then I would get it and then not worry about future consequences. Is that what you mean?


5 years ago

Yes.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Oh ok; thanks for clarifying. :)


5 years ago

YW. Like you say, 'The anticipation of something you want usually is half the fun'. So I guess you've already proved you're not averse to the fun of gauges, right? (I guess it could be said that a tattoo, and its anticipation and planning, might be described as involving some level of fun, too, I suppose.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

lol Gauges were fun anticipating while it lasted, but I won't be making them any bigger. Yes, I'm sure that's one of the reasons people enjoy getting tattoos.


5 years ago

Like you say re. anticipation is half the fun: so you had real fun, anticipating stretching up the gauges, did you? So is it also fun anticipating your possible first tattoo, also? Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, it was fun to think about moving from one gauge to a larger one. Considering I won't be getting a tattoo, it's hard to say. lol


5 years ago

Re. gauges: you've leveled out at 2g, I guess. Re. fun anticipating a tattoo: the phrase I used was 'your possible first tattoo', rather than definite one. (Or stated differently, writing does sometimes clarify one's thoughts to oneself.)

Blessings.


5 years ago

PS: This partly because in writing, one tends to stop and analyze things a bit more, from more angles than might have been the case otherwise.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, I have. :) Are you saying that because I wrote about tattoos, it might lead me to think about getting a tattoos or about tattoos in general?


5 years ago

What I guess I'm suggesting is that the process of writing, from its conceptual to articulation stages, can involve both focusing on the particular and contemplating the generality. Once the mind over a period starts to build up a measured framework for analyzing a theory, fact or issue, this can solidify into a stronger, or less strong, opinion than previously.

(Incidentally, this is why for ppl who believe in theory that 'true love waits', for them subsequently to focus a great deal on people's experiences of losing virginity before marriage can have the maybe unforeseen consequence in the long term of altering one's outlook. But I digress; this has nothing to do with tattoos.)

So back to bodmod (in which you've already experimented just a bit). You've written thoughtfully, sympathetically and at some length about tattoos, and have perceptively highlighted some relevant aspects. The fact is, only you can answer just how sympathetic you are to the subject.

Then, again, just how sympathetic you are may to some extent relate in some way to the amount of thoughtful and perceptive writing you continue to do on the subject.

(I hope this makes some sense, and goes some way toward answering your question.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I think I understand what you mean generally. I might change my mind as I reflect on the subject of tattoos and write about them. I'm not adverse to the idea of tattoos on others, but I'm not wholly sold on them for myself.


5 years ago

Re. 'I might change my mind as I reflect on the subject of tattoos and write about them.'

There is sometimes a development between reflection and writing, the mental processes of which can involve a change of mind, yes. (Including with tattoos, or whatever.)

'I'm not adverse to the idea of tattoos on others, but I'm not wholly sold on them for myself.'

Again, it's interesting that here in your thinking the 'not averse' and 'not wholly sold' are stated negatively, as balancing statements. It remains to be seen whether, beyond your guarded, balanced statements, will develop further, self-clarifying thinking and even the change of mind that is mentioned in your earlier sentence.

(If I've paraphrased correctly what you said. :) )

Writing reflectively can certainly have an effect on the writer. (Whether he or she realizes it at first.)

Blessings.


5 years ago

Hyphenbird: PS: re. face and hand tattoos: like you say, these would kind of be in a different category because they are not easily covered; so I guess they certainly would be more of an issue for employers; but most of the discussion here isn't about these placements, I guess, right?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Right; who knows what will happen in the future, but my plan now is to never get a tattoo.


5 years ago

Yes, planning and knowing can be two different things. (The sometimes obscure mental link between planning and knowing is probably something to do with the future strength of 'wanting' something, right?)

Like you say, who knows?

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

The more I know you, f, the more I realize how deep you are sometimes. lol Yes, we usually won't plan something if we don't want it to happen.


5 years ago

Deep or not (!), put differently, you don't know what will happen, though you might get to know more clearly, depending on how much one day a change of plan might appeal to you. But I guess now that all your acquired knowledge and interest in writing on the subject was intended to be purely hypothetical?

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, that's a good way of describing it: 'hypothetical'. It was an interesting, modern topic to write about: tattoos and finding a job.


5 years ago

Re. 'modern topic', yes, like you say, it's of real contemporary relevance, right?

It shouldn't be surprising that someone like you who seems to be fashion conscious, quite sophisticated and articulate, would want to express herself on this relevant, modern topic.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I guess not. lol Thanks for the compliment!


5 years ago

Or put another way, it's just the sort of thing that a lady like you would likely be into, at some level or other.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Oh ok; cool.


5 years ago

Clearly it's true in your case, anyway. ('At some level or other.')

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, you're right.


5 years ago

At some latent (or possibly more overt) level, they must intrigue you, anyway.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

lol I still think you want me to get a tattoo. As I said, they intrigue me when I see them on other people (as a work of art), but they aren't for me.


5 years ago

Hey, not for me to say at all!!

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I know; I just realize sometimes you have persistence in pursuing that topic (doesn't bother me; just noticing).


5 years ago

Maybe I should have kept quiet long ago about this intriguing subject.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

No, it's ok. Like I said, it doesn't bother me. I was just pointing out what I was noticing.


5 years ago

jaredbangarter: Re.: 'Lots of my dream jobs listed here. haha'

You mean, they are dream jobs precisely because they allow visible tattoos?

I guess visibility is the issue, rather than having them.

Ebower: I guess this comment makes some sense, too?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Which comment are you speaking of?


5 years ago

Sorry, I meant my response to jaredbangarter about it being the visibility of tattoos among employers that is the issue, rather than having them.

I could have been a bit more clear.

Blessings.


5 years ago

Like, who is to stop anyone having tattoos if they are covered up?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Well, that's true. If they can't be seen, then they shouldn't be a problem for employers. That's why one should think about the placement of tattoos before getting them.


5 years ago

I guess, then, the issue isn't necessarily: tattoo or no tattoo. More likely, and practically the issue is: which tattoo placement.

(As well as design/message, of course.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Of course, those issues are different for different people. So, all of them can come into play in various ways. For example, for those that want to get a tattoo, the issue is not whether or not to get one, but which one to get, which tattoo parlor to go to, and where it should be placed on their body. For those that have already decided not to get one, I guess none of those come into play. lol


5 years ago

What I meant, was: 'No tattoos' doesn't mean 'no tattoos'. It means: 'Cover them'. Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Oh; I'm sorry. lol Yes, that's a good point. Employers won't mind if they can't see them.


5 years ago

It's okay! It's a case of, Employers OUGHT not to mind, in some cases, whether or not some of them might have an animus against them and want to recruit completely tattoo-less people. (Sometimes the line between the two is blurred.) Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Right; it's almost a matter of how one's personal life meshes with their professional life.


5 years ago

Sometimes the real dividing line isn't understood by the potential employer, it seems. Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I agree.


5 years ago

Regrettable, maybe?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I haven't experienced it first hand, because I don't have any tattoos, but I'm sure it is.


5 years ago

I think the tenor of your whole article, above, would tend towards the defense of tattooed people in employment. Hence my question, anyway.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I guess it does point in that direction. I just know that many people have tattoos and would want some information that might help them regarding employment.


5 years ago

Yes, this is true. I guess you are continuing to formulate your precise views and attitudes to the whole subject, to some extent.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Maybe, like you said, to some extent, but must of them are already in place.


5 years ago

Sorry; I didn't mean to sound patronizing; you've been an adult for years now already.

It's just that I wondered whether you are getting into the whole theme of tattooing from the standpoint of workers' rights, or more from aesthetics, or wherever.

Blessings.


5 years ago

Or, stated differently: it's quite reasonable to assume that you yourself are very tattoo-friendly. :)

Blessings.


5 years ago

Re. 'Hyphenbird: I agree with you. It's definitely become more accepted by our culture and society as a whole. .. Tattoos reflect a person's heart'.

It's all about the heart, yes, indeed. Whether they actually get one or not, the idea is that the HEART is shown. (I guess in your case, whether or not you would actually get one, your heart would be to show faith in Scripture truth.)

Pascal said, The heart has its reasons that reason knows not.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, tattoos are like wearing one's heart on your 'sleeve'. I really like that quote. :)


5 years ago

You liked it, then? I see. ...


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, the quote reminds me of how the heart is a mystery and sometimes it seems like we can't choose how we feel about a certain person.


5 years ago

Yes, interesting. I think also that Pascal was using the words to express the reason and motive for faith, that rationalism can't figure.

So you like the quote, then. (Maybe would make good wording for a tattoo ... )

Blessings.


5 years ago

(Hypothetically, of course, not your tattoo ...)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, that would be a lovely tattoo for someone.


5 years ago

Sounds like such a design would give you quite a kick theoretically and aesthetically, anyway.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

You're right; I would enjoy viewing it randomly on someone.


5 years ago

Thought so, anyhow. Especially if it were, like you say, "wearing one's heart on your 'sleeve' ": literally, a tattoo half- or full-sleeve. (More and more women as well as men are getting half- or full-sleeves tattooed today; it used to be regarded as a male placement, but this has most definitely changed - and for the better?)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

That's kind of what I meant: dual meaning. lol Some girls with tattoo sleeves look cool. I think it depends on the person.


5 years ago

Well, you, with tattoo knowledge, grasped the dual meaning of 'sleeves' before I did, anyway (& you've included sleeve photos, incl. of the waitress). Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Well, that's true.


5 years ago

Re. 'Some girls with tattoo sleeves look cool.' So I guess you would be generally positive to the fact that it's now a feminine placement, too? Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, I am generally. They look good on some females.


5 years ago

I know from what you've said that you're not necessarily going to get a tattoo at all, but maybe if you did you wouldn't choose a lower arm sleeve, would you? However cool-looking, in principle, yet they're harder to cover.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, IF I did get a tattoo, it would be easy to hide it.


5 years ago

Sounds like you've already figured the placement for it, at least hypothetically. Blessings.


5 years ago

PS (Differently from the waitress in the photo, anyway.)


5 years ago

PS: jaredbangerter: Re.: I wasn't aware modeling allowed tattoos, but I guess that makes sense cause they could always photoshop it out.'

Actually for a model, a tattoo is now regarded as an asset, sometimes, if it's tasteful.


5 years ago

Hyphenbird: 'It seems tattoos are more accepted now.' While this is undoubtedly true, do you think ppl can on the one hand rationally accept this as true, but retain a bit of a (more irrational? conscientious? etc.) complex about them?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, hypothetically. I could advise others on where to place their tattoos at the lesat. Regarding models, it really depends on the company or individual that hires models and whether or not a model's tattoos fit in with their design aspect.


5 years ago

'at the lesat', i.e., 'at the least'?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Whoops! Sorry; that's what I meant. I guess I was typing too fast. lol :)


5 years ago

So you could advise about placements? I think you do like sleeves, including for women, but business-wise they could be tricky. Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Right; I don't know how informed my advise would be. I guess the placement would be common sense in that the tattoos would be able to be covered for work. Sleeves would be hard to cover, unless the female was willing to wear long sleeves all year round.


5 years ago

Maybe a new hub that focuses specifically on common sense aspects of 2 or 3 different tattoo placements would be something that you could write quite quickly (and you might find interesting to write, too)?

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Actually, that's an excellent idea! Maybe I'll work on that this weekend. :)


5 years ago

Well, go for it, anyway. A number of hubwriters have each done multiple hubs on tattoo themes, and since you seem to know a lot about the subject, you could easily be one of them. Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

That's true; thanks for the idea. :)


5 years ago

YW, Blessings


5 years ago

So, any further insights or thoughts on tattooing (in general terms, that is, rather than for you) in recent weeks?

Blessings.


5 years ago

PS: Re. the main photo at the head of your hub article, do you think that it shows or symbolizes the shaking of hands between a businessman and businesswoman? (i.e., with tattoo sleeves clearly established as a female look?)

(What do you think?)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I think that that is a picture of two males shaking hands. I believe that tattoo sleeves are worn by both males and females.


5 years ago

Oh okay, you can probably see the picture better than me.

But yes, the sleeve used to be mainly a male thing but women are getting them, too, right?

The picture, above, of the waitress with the sleeve is a case in point, isn't it?

(Maybe the sleeve, full, or half-, wouldn't be your preferred placement, though, if ever you did happen to get tattooed?)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, I've seen several women with tattoo sleeves now. Personally, I would probably never get a sleeve, but just maybe a few tattoos (if I got one at all).


5 years ago

Well, I see.

'Yes, I've seen several women with tattoo sleeves now'. Did they look good, did you think?

'Personally, I would probably never get a sleeve, but just maybe a few tattoos (if I got one at all).'

So you've still maybe (just) got in mind the possibility of getting tattooed? 'maybe a few tattoos'; i.e, like you realize that if you did it, you might end up getting more than one, I suppose?

(It can be a bit addictive, anyway.)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

The ones that I saw looked pretty good I think. I'm not planning on getting tattoos, but never say never. lol Yes, I've heard if you get one, you'll want to get another one and another one...etc.


TattooKitty profile image

TattooKitty 5 years ago from Hawaii

Wonderful topic for a hub (and very well-written)! I've definitely got my fair share of easily visible tattoos, yet my profession is not necessarily an advocate for body art. As a teacher, I'm often asked how I get away with being so "inked". I truly believe that, as you mentioned, tattoos are becoming more widely accepted.

Still, I know that my circumstances are very fortunate. Thus, I try to make the most of it by using my tattoos to help the students better understand literary terms, such as metaphor and symbol. It's much easier for them to understand these abstract concepts when connecting them to visual examples.

Thanks for the great read! Voted up ;)


5 years ago

'never say never. lol'

(smile)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I promise I was not trying to refer to a Justin Bieber song. lol


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

TattooKitty: Thank you very much! Wow; I've never heard of a teacher with tattoos, but I think it's awesome you use them to help you teach. I'm sure the students feel like they can relate to you and enjoy learning more when tattoos are used as examples. Thanks for reading and voting up! Thank you also for sharing your personal experience. Have a great day! :)


5 years ago

'ones that I saw looked pretty good I think'.

So you do indeed think tattoo sleeves look really good on women as well as men?

Interestingly, I saw the post by TattooKitty and saw as well that she recently wrote a whole hubpage on tattoo sleeves.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I think they can look good on both genders. To me, it just depends on the person. Oh cool; I'll have to check that out soon.


5 years ago

Tattoo sleeves used to be a male thing. But exclusively, certainly not any more. When they get them, women now feel they do it confidently and appropriately, right?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I wouldn't know personally, because I don't have one, but it's most likely not perceived as weird if females get them now.


5 years ago

So do you like the tattoo sleeve of the restaurant waitress in the photo you supplied?

Would such a tattoo design still be a bit much for you, even if you did get a tattoo eventually? i.e., maybe you'd get a smaller design?

Blessings.


BusinessTime profile image

BusinessTime 5 years ago from Twin Cities

I have a half-sleeve (planets and galaxies), along with an assortment of other smaller tattoos, and I work in a law office as a writer, editor, and product developer. Luckily for me, the wonderful people I work with appreciate my talents and dedication rather than focus on my body, and it's a simple matter to throw on a sweater for special occasions.

Then again, I live in the Twin Cities -- a pretty progressive area as far as personal expression goes, to be sure.

Thanks for the great hub and for providing a great venue for discussion.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

f: I like her sleeve, but I wish the colors were more vibrant; that's just my opinion. I would definitely get a small tattoo if I did get one.

BusinessTime: Wow; that sounds really cool. I appreciate people and businesses that look at what's most important: a person's skills (and inside rather than one's outside). Thanks for sharing your personal experience!


5 years ago

'f: I like her sleeve, but I wish the colors were more vibrant; that's just my opinion. I would definitely get a small tattoo if I did get one.'

There's your word 'vibrant' again! (You did an interesting hub on the spectrum of colors a while back.) So you think if women or men are prepared to get a sleeve, it's good if they go the whole way, as it were, and make sure the colors are vibrant and bright?

If you get yours, I guess you'll consider getting vibrant colors, too, though maybe not on with a sleeve placement? (Something faith related, maybe?)

Blessings.


5 years ago

PS: Re. Business Time's sleeve comment: I don't speak for her but I think she said on another hub that she is works on a franchise basis in a law office and I reckon that if franchising is going to be increasingly part of the workplace scene, then it will be also increasingly hard for company managements to 'avoid' the presence of ppl who, like Business Time, enjoy sleeve art (which can be covered sometimes anyway).

Blessings.


BusinessTime profile image

BusinessTime 5 years ago from Twin Cities

I honestly think the times are changing (although, again, I understand that the Twin Cities culture might be a little more relaxed than others). A very respected doctor friend of mine just completed her full back piece that was 9 months in the making; my elementary schoolteacher friend is practically covered everywhere that isn't visible in a classroom; my tattooed fiance works at a Montessori school. I'd be very interested to know how many of the people in dark suits and shiny shoes and briefcases that I pass every day have tattoos that no one sees in their normal work attire -- I think a lot of people against "tattoos in the workplace" would be surprised to learn how many of their peers have made that choice for themselves without feeling the need to broadcast it in their professional lives.

Everyone has personal responsibility, and everyone has their own way of looking at the world around them. I never go into a situation expecting to force someone else to accept me, tattoos and all. I know how to be respectful and dress for the occasions I'm in, and I have the foresight to know what's going to cause a problem.

Case in point: I've been wanting to extend my half-sleeve for awhile now, but since I'm not a full-time freelance editor yet and because I plan on going to PTA conferences with my future children, it's a priority of mine to be able to comfortably cover my tattoos whenever I feel like it. I've decided the full-sleeve can wait until I figure out my life a little more, so instead I got a smaller thing (a John Lennon scribble-portrait) on the back of my neck that I've been mulling over since high school and never made the jump, knowing that all I have to do to cover it is wear my hair up (which I do nearly all the time anyway). My reasons are my own, and whoever sees it sees it because I choose to let them.

I guess my point is that what we're really talking about here is visible tattoos vs. covered tattoos -- not tattoos vs. a lack of them entirely. At the end of the day, it's a personal decision -- what you want to put on your body, where you want to put it, and whether or not fitting into a corporate society in the future factors into that decision. And if a potential employer would ever ask me point blank what's going on under my clothes, I would stand up, thank them for making my employment decision easier, and leave.

If you decide to get a tattoo somewhere you can't cover when the situation demands, you need to accept that you can't make everyone like it, and you need to be OK with that. (That's fine -- not everyone is going to like you anyway, no matter what you refrain from putting on your body. As with everything else, you make your decision, you accept the consequences, and you move on with your life.)


5 years ago

BusinessTime: Interesting, thorough comments.

Obviously you have put a great deal of thought into your half-sleeve. I was wondering: are half-sleeves by definition the upper arm? because you were referring to the idea of getting a full sleeve eventually, but you want to be able to cover it easily for work, still. So I guess that most half-sleeves are upper arm and ppl 'graduate' to the lower arm afterwards. (Rather than a half-sleeve on the lower arm, 'graduating' later to the upper, also.)

However, some ppl like a wrist tattoo, and in some cases it can also be extended later into a sleeve. So some ppl do begin with the lower arm. Depends on the work environment, I guess.


BusinessTime profile image

BusinessTime 5 years ago from Twin Cities

Exactly -- that was the choice that I made, and those were my reasons. I would find it more difficult to cover my lower arm or wrist than to cover my upper arm.


5 years ago

BusinessTime:

Yes, for a business environment I agree it takes more effort and planning to cover the lower arm. More effort, though not an insurmountable difficulty.

I'm sure you would also argue that the full sleeve has become a legit. female as well as male tattoo look. I guess you'll extend yours to a full-sleeve when you are ready. And not before.


5 years ago

Ebower: the comments made by Business Time, above, are rather interesting, aren't they? Blessings.


5 years ago

PS: Also, the waitress photo might be some what of an under-exposure(?), which could be made more colourful, I don't know; also, the fact is that when ppl get tattoos, they sometimes have the pigmentation added to after some years, and I guess we don't know how long the young lady in the photo has had hers done. (Two cents'.) Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, they definitely are. Her tattoos could have faded over the years or she could have chosen more muted colors.


5 years ago

You'd probably prefer significantly brighter colors on any eventual one, I reckon (though probably smaller, I guess). Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

You know me well. If I did get one, I would want it exactly as you have described.


5 years ago

(Smile.) I guess so...!

I can't read your mind though. Blessings.


5 years ago

PS: I wouldn't have a clue about your preferred placement, or about the design, though faith related might come into it, I think.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Haha; lucky guess I suppose. I'm not sure either, but it would most definitely have something to do with my faith.


5 years ago

Like a Bible related word or words, or symbol, I suppose. But anyway, these days the whole question of placements seems to be more fluid, with not only male but female tattoos being sleeves, like the waitress picture you supplied. Blessings.


5 years ago

In fact, you would likely count it an honor to bear faith based ink, wouldn't you?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

I might; it's just too permanent for me.


5 years ago

You're right about the permanence. And I guess the notions of permanence and faith are deeply connected, too.

Anyway, you must know, or think you know, what your preference is; I do sense that you sometimes blow hot and cold on the whole issue and, most definitely, one needs to blow hot constantly before going ahead, right?

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

My faith is most definitely important to me and permanent. This doesn't mean that I have to have something that symbolizes my faith permanently on me. I'm not sure what you mean by hot and cold. I do not plan to get a tattoo, but I'm not one to say the word 'never', because I can't predict the future and I don't like eating my words.


5 years ago

Re. 'hot and cold':

Oh, it's just an expression, meaning wavering between two aspects of something. Whereas my point was, and it's your view too, I think, that for anyone getting a tattoo, the person needs to be firmly wanting it as a constant thing.

'I'm not one to say the word 'never', because I can't predict the future and I don't like eating my words.'

Well, exactly. It's just possible that one day, you might for faith testimony reasons firmly want to become a tattooed lady (but if so, way into the future).

I guess this makes sense?

Blessings.


5 years ago

Re. Tattookitty: 'Wonderful topic for a hub (and very well-written)!' Yes, it is, isn't it? And Ebower is a talented writer.

Re. ebower: 'Her tattoos could have faded over the years'. Yes, well it's not unusual for people to touch up their tattoos with more color after some years. So it's possible that the young lady in the photo that you supplied was photographed when she was 'due' for some added ink, right? if this is what she wanted, anyway.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, you definitely made sense; I understand what you're saying. Aptly put: 'Well, exactly. It's just possible that one day, you might for faith testimony reasons firmly want to become a tattooed lady (but if so, way into the future).'

Perhaps; this could be true. I don't know.


5 years ago

If the time ever comes, when you want to do it, you'll be sure in your mind, I think.

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, I will have to be certain in order to get one.


5 years ago

Yes, and, don't worry, that sense of certainty about it — if it happens at all — will be very clear to you.

(Basically it's the sort of clear certainty about the permanence of it. Because at an abstract level, the general idea of a tasteful faith tattoo design probably already seems nice to you. Getting certainty, is the key.) Blessings.


5 years ago

(Does this ring true, at all?)


Ebower profile image

Ebower 5 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, that's makes sense. I don't know what to say other than that. I guess something would have to 'click' within me; clarity like you said.


5 years ago

Yes, an already liked, nice faith tattoo design, if this 'click' within you that you speak of, happens, is sth that you'll really KNOW to go ahead with, when you experience the 'click'.

(Though different, not unlike the inner 'click' you must have experienced when you decided you want to gauge your ears.)

Sounds okay?


5 years ago

Business Time: "I would find it more difficult to cover my lower arm or wrist than to cover my upper arm." Yes, upper arm is regularly a placement choice for a first tattoo.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, I understand what you are saying. I decided to just go for it after I thought about whether or not gauging my ears would be a good idea. I realized that it's not completely permanent and that helped me in my decision.


4 years ago

I see. Anyway, the Point of No Return for gauging can vary from one person to another. But, then, tattoo removal is possible, though sometimes difficult and can leave the skin looking different. So on the one hand it's not an exact comparison between tattooing and gauging. And on the the other, there are some similarities which, though limited, are reasonably strong, too. To use your words, 'something would have to 'click' within me; clarity like you said': this seems to have happened with your desire for gauges. Similarly, an inner 'click' about the gentle enhancement of a tasteful faith design, if you ever wanted one, would be what would make the approach to you of the tattooist's needle happen. (Makes some sense?)

Blessings.


4 years ago

PS: Business Time: "you need to accept that you can't make everyone like it, and you need to be OK with that." Well, exactly; in the end the person has to do his or her own thing, and move on.


4 years ago

TattooKitty: 'I try to make the most of it by using my tattoos to help the students better understand literary terms, such as metaphor and symbol. It's much easier for them to understand these abstract concepts when connecting them to visual examples.' Interesting that you should be able to link literary themes with your ink; like, bridging the abstract with the aesthetically concrete.


4 years ago

ebower: Not sure if it was you that uploaded the photo of the bride with a sleeve tattoo on the whenheavencalls page, mentioned on your Hubpages homepage, that you also subscribe to; even more than your photos on this page, it kind of confirms how a sleeve can be combined with, rather than being opposed to, a traditional look of formal elegance.

(Some of the sleeves photos you have supplied on this page are probably more casual in context.)

Hope this makes sense, too.

Blessings.


4 years ago

ebower:

Anyway, have a great Christmas! Planning anything special?

(And BTW, if you think about it, the idea of a 'Seasonal' tattoo design wouldn't really work at all, would it, because it wouldn't be so relevant year round and it's by nature permanent, right?)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: I didn't upload that photo, but I liked it, so I reblogged it on tumblr. I guess I wouldn't use the term 'traditional', but can be elegant; yes (modern would be the word I would use).

Merry Christmas! Not anything very special, just spending time with family and attending church. Yes, I agree that that wouldn't work very well, because tattoos are very permanent and would stay on your skin all year long lol.


4 years ago

Yes, while the tattoo sleeve itself might not be traditional, the remainder of the appearance of the bride in the photo you reblogged is certainly traditional, to the extent of being gracefully and refinedly so.

'I liked it' ; 'can be elegant'; sounds as if this bridal photo appeals to you, anyway. (Whether a similar bridal tattoo sleeve would appeal to you in the future as your bridal look, is another matter which would remain to be seen, I guess, right?)

Blessings.


4 years ago

A Happy New Year to you, Ebower!

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

Correct; I like it, but I'm not sure I like it for me. Happy New Year to you as well, f!


4 years ago

Yes, it's nice, isn't it; something rather elegant about it, isn't it. Photo well spotted by you, anyway.

Re. New Year: with the new year, comes resolutions, right?

(There considerations of elegance aside, I guess with you, however, you are resolved NOT to become a tattooed lady in 2012. Correct?)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

Haha; agreed. No tattoos for me in 2012. :)


4 years ago

But to sum up from the title of this well-written hub, are you going to be tattoo-friendly in 2012...?


4 years ago

(...which I guess is slightly different, right? Blessings)


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, of course I'll be tattoo friendly for any year. I try not to judge people by their outer appearance.


4 years ago

I saw your very recent appreciative comment about rose tattoo designs on the other hub. You certainly seem to like them, right? and your appreciation doesn't seem to be diminishing.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, I do appreciate them on others as an art form, but that's as far as they go for me personally.


4 years ago

Business Time:

Re. "A very respected doctor friend of mine just completed her full back piece that was 9 months in the making; my elementary schoolteacher friend is practically covered everywhere that isn't visible in a classroom; my tattooed fiancé works at a Montessori school. I'd be very interested to know how many of the people in dark suits and shiny shoes and briefcases that I pass every day have tattoos that no one sees in their normal work attire".

Yes, I'm sure what you say is true. I'm sure that so many professionals are having it done. Like, you said, often it's in a placement where if the person wants and it the occasion suggests it, the tattoo can be covered.

Maybe the author of this hub, Ebower, if she ever eventually decides to go down this route, this is how she would prefer to do it. Like your doctor friend, like your teacher friend, like your fiancé, get the design done: become a tattooed professional but always in a placement that can be covered.

Makes sense, right?


4 years ago

"f: Yes, I do appreciate them on others as an art form, but that's as far as they go for me personally."

Oh okay, yes I understand you like to back track a little, which is fine. Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Backtracking is legal and I'm just telling the truth. :)


4 years ago

Ebower: Yes, I simply meant by backtracking I guess, on the one hand part of your emphasis is your evidently considerable interest in and liking for tattoos; on the other hand, another aspect for emphasis is that you're not planning one yourself in the foreseeable future. (Whatever term you prefer, I guess!) Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

Yes, I understand now; thanks. :)


4 years ago

YW; and it seems they are anyway a subject that you definitely like very much. Blessings.


4 years ago

PS: And there's been more commenting on makinbacon's tattoo hub, too, that you contributed comment to.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, you are right. Cool; I'll have to check it out.


4 years ago

Yes, and your comment about the rose and compass design being vintage-looking was apt, too. I guess you saw the rose and skull design, too; I wondered what your impression was. (It used to that only men got designs incorporating a skull motif, but this is changing, especially if combined with flower patters, as the one shown.)

Anyway, it's an absorbing study, with many avenues and with lots of aesthetically engaging aspects. Blessings.


mfriedstore profile image

mfriedstore 4 years ago from 176 Flushing Avenue Brooklyn , New York

everyone of us bagged with unique talents wherein it is up to us on how to use it. Well, there is nothing wrong with tattoo, indeed it is your way of expressing yourself to other people what you feel. Though, other people find it untidy, it only depends to the people on how they are going to define this artwork.Thank you so much for this inspiring information of yours.


4 years ago

mfriedstore: "it is your way of expressing yourself to other people what you feel."

This is true, although for some ppl — Ebower and many others included — they wish to keep to themselves from a practical how they really feel in terms of expressing themselves by this medium (which is fine). For other people, a tattoo is almost principally an expression to the person himself or herself. (Re. herself: in North America a small majority of tattoo parlor clients are now actually women.)


4 years ago

PS: Ebower: so did you see any good tattoo designs lately?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

mfriedstore: This is very true. I'm sorry I missed your comment. Thanks for your input! :)

f: No, I haven't seen any recently.


4 years ago

I see; anyway, I think you once mentioned that you are in a small, Southern town where not so many people (and not so many women) have visible tattoos.

So I guess you wish that people there were a little more tattoo-friendly, and more specifically, that more women there were tattoo-friendly, too. Right?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: That's true. If you mean that I wish that more people were open to tattoos on others then yes. I think it's a personal choice and what's important about a person is what's inside. That doesn't mean that I wish everyone had tattoos, but that people wouldn't judge others based on them.


4 years ago

Yes, I know what you mean, ty. 'That doesn't mean I wish everyone had tattoos.' No, I don't, either! But I guess part of it is being, in general terms, more female-tattoo-friendly, right?


4 years ago

Wow, is it a year since you published this hub?


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, it is; almost to the day in fact!


4 years ago

It seems to have mushroomed, and almost taken a life of its own. (No regrets, then?)


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, I'm glad it's become popular; no regrets.


4 years ago

Yes, well you really are a tattoo connoisseuse, Ebower, aren't you. God bless.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: I'm not sure if I am, but I'll take it. :)


4 years ago

Well, anyway, you do seem to know a great deal about make up and tattoos. You've obviously studied them a great deal and I guess I could say that you've taught me quite a bit, anyway. Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: They are definitely topics of interest for me. I'm glad I was able to teach you something. :)


teach84 4 years ago

I have 1 yr of school left before completing my education degree in AYA Integrated Social Studies (7-12 grade Social Studies) and I just got my first tattoo on my left inner wrist. It is the word determination written in Arabic with a small hot pink heart next to it. The way it is written also means perseverance as well as persistence. I know that many schools will not hire people with visible tattoos, some will require it to be covered at all times (not a problem), and some do not require them to be covered.

I feel that as long as the tattoo is not vulgar or offensive (like "I love Satan," etc...) it should not be a problem. I'm 28 and waited to choose one that had meaning to me. I have had to work full-time through a back injury in order to pursue this degree. In general I have always been a very determined individual and go after what I want. I am also considering getting one on my foot that represents reaching for the stars aka going for your dreams. Some it will show unless I am wearing tennis shoes, although it can be covered with a bandaid. (I typically wear flats).

Yes teachers are supposed to be role models to students, but I do not see how tattoos, especially ones like mine are bad influences. Teachers with tattoos show students it's ok to be individuals while still being good, "normal" people. Most teachers are not ultra-conservative like they want us to portray to the public. If a student says something about it, I'd explain the significance, but then also explain I took my time deciding and waited until I was older to make such a permanent decision. (Good Learning opportunity there). Many students have them and a large number of parents have them unless you are teaching at a private school or at a school in a well-to do district.

What are you feelings on this? Like I said I have no problem covering it if necessary, but would prefer not to do so.


Ashley 4 years ago

Interesting. I work at a huge company and people have small visible tattoos and piercings in several areas of the company including finance. I'm not saying they are the CFO or CEO, but they are easily making well over $50K in professional roles with tattoos. Just check the company policy before getting tattooed in an area that could be visible. Also, make sensible choices with tattoos that are visible. Do not have offensive symbols, language, etc. showing in the workplace.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

teach84: I think having positive tattoos is a great way to be a role model towards students. Many schools will probably want you to cover them up, but there might be some more flexible schools that will allow you to show them if they are small. I guess the main idea is to use caution and think about all the possibilities before getting a tattoo.

Ashley: Thanks for sharing your personal experience with tattoos in the workplace. Yes, it's very important to check a company's policy before deciding on a new tattoo. That's very good advice. Thanks for your helpful comment!


4 years ago

It's interesting that some companies are more flexible.

So, EBower, are you any nearer an eventual tattoo plan?


4 years ago

(eg, like as the big 30th b-day is on the horizon, for instance?)


4 years ago

Or maybe for your a tatt is exclusively for other folk, only...


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: I'm not going to get a tattoo, but I enjoy others' tattoos as an art form.


4 years ago

Okay, ty, ebower. You seem pretty sure of yourself, there, anyway. (You're probably more into other forms of bodyart, such as lobe stretching, I think, right?)

Blessings.


Ebower profile image

Ebower 4 years ago from Georgia Author

f: Yes, I like ear stretching better. :)


4 years ago

I see; so how's the ear stretching going at the moment?

Blessings.


3 years ago

Hi; any movement on the gauges lately? Blessings.


DanielleCherise profile image

DanielleCherise 3 years ago from Virginia Beach

Don't forget about the military!


Ebower profile image

Ebower 3 years ago from Georgia Author

DanielleCherise: You are so right! Thanks for sharing. :)


3 years ago

BTW, Ebower, what do you think of tattooing lipstick, or at least the dark outline around the lips? (Few employers would be able to object, surely.) Blessings.


nstrang profile image

nstrang 3 years ago

Very insightful information, especially because I am in the midst of applying for a new job, and that is one of the key factors in my decision to "go for it" with each company. I currently have 9 tattoos, and all of them can be hidden in one way or another with clothing. Although I get the tattoos because they represent something about me, I do feel that the manner in which I have decided to get them (knowing they can be hidden) works in my favor if an employer is strict on their appearance rules. Great Hub, look forward to reading more of your work :)


FullOfLoveSites profile image

FullOfLoveSites 3 years ago from United States

Though I don't have a tattoo, still I enjoyed reading this hub. Will share this to my "inked" friends. More often than not they're rejected despite their qualifications just because of the tattoo. This hub might help them. Thanks. Voted up and shared. :)


khmazz profile image

khmazz 3 years ago from South Florida

I am a huge supporter of "inked in the workplace" being a business professional with tattoos I am thankful for the stigma lessoning throughout society! Great hub!


Ebower profile image

Ebower 3 years ago from Georgia Author

f: I don't think employers would have a problem with it. They might not like it if it was a neon color or something that looks very unnatural. Other than that, I'm sure most would be fine with it.

nstrang: That's a smart way to enjoy tattoos. It frees you up to express yourself in the way that you want, but having the option to cover it with clothing is an intelligent way to make yourself employable. I hope you find a new job soon. Thank you; I would be honored if you read more!

FullofLoveSites: I don't have tattoos either, but I think it's a good topic to discuss, because people do have them today. Thanks for sharing! I hope it helps your friends. :)

khmazz: Yes, I think society is changing and that's a good thing. A person's skills and work experience are more important than merely their appearance. Thank you!


3 years ago

Anyway, this is a subject you seem to have learned quite a lot about. Why not also write a hub about ear gauging? which I think you also know quite a lot about? (Just a suggestion.)


Jmillis2006 profile image

Jmillis2006 3 years ago from North Carolina

I do not have tattoos but the grooming saloon I work at does not allow them to be shown the also do not allow you to have a haircut or color that could be considered un natural.


3 years ago

Hi ebower! re-read your great hub, after a while has gone by. So have you revisited your thoughts about subjects such as ear stretching, and tattoos, just recently? Blessings.


3 years ago

And PS: You've added more photos!


jameson 3 years ago

is there a modeling agency just for people with tattoos for men??


Dee 2 years ago

Tatoo on your face and neck=NO job

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