Occupy Wall Street: I'm Mad As Hell...

Julie, a protester at Occupy St. Louis.
Julie, a protester at Occupy St. Louis. | Source

"We are the 99%." So began the cry on Wall Street and soon was echoed by grass roots organizations across the country. I have not been to the mountaintop, but I have been to the fountain. The fountain in Kiener Plaza where Occupy St. Louis as taken root and grows day by day. Arrests have been made, and still the people come. The police have been courteous. The occupiers have been courteous. Let's hope it remains so, but they (we) will not go away.

Occupy Wall Street and its many city localities is a way of standing up, going to the window and, like Howard Beale from the movie "Network," yelling, "I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore."

Source

Effecting Change in Government

I do not have answers, only questions. Lots and lots of questions. But unless we stand up and demand answers and reform, it will never come to be. The problems and challenges this country is facing are so extensive they are beyond addressing with a simple list of demands. in New York, they are now splitting up into concern groups--those whose interest is the destruction of the environment gather over here, those whose interest is the Federal Reserve gather over here--for each sub-group to come up with their own statements.

As for effective ways to make change, the traditional ways are not working. Say it at the ballot box? Doesn't work. Write your Congressman? Doesn't work. Perhaps this beginning--this tiny ember in the pile of leaves that are the problems in the country--will find its stoking wind and spread until the fire demands attention. Already the fire has begun to spread.

Source

The Problem with Politics

I may not know the answers, but I know this: In a country where the Supreme Court can declare that corporations are people and thereby open the road to corporations controlling politics; where government agencies that were created to protect us have been sold out to corporations that genetically engineer crops or add sythetic protiens to milk and heaven knows what additives to our food supply--all so corporations can get more profit at the expense of the people's health; where political parties can gerrymander voting districts to disenfrancise those that might vote against them; and on and on, then something is horribly, horribly wrong. Not to mention the crises of distribution.

Özlem Onaran, a senior lecturer in economics at Middlesex University, Britain, wrote at Internationalviewpoint.org, "We are in a new episode of the global crisis: the struggle to distribute the costs of the crisis. This crisis has been an outcome of increased exploitation and inequality, since the post-1980s across the globe. Neoliberalism (not to be confused with traditional liberalism) attack on workers. The outcome was a dramatic decline in worker’s bargaining power and labor’s share in income across the globe in the post-1980s."

Some would argue that the destruction of American began in 1913 with the creation of the Central Bank.and the Federal Reserve. Thomas Jefferson foresaw the problem many years before when he wrote, ""I sincerely believe, with you, that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies; and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale."

For the People; By the People

This country was created as a republic, for the people by the people. Hardly seems like the people have anything to do with it any more. The income tax was created to redistribute wealth, from rich to poor (within reason), but it has reversed, redistributing wealth from the poor and middle class (which is practically poor anymore) to the rich.

Well I am mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore.

I am but one. But we are the 99%.

More by this Author


Comments 72 comments

Sally's Trove profile image

Sally's Trove 5 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

First, nice to see you here. It's been a long time and I know I'm not the only one who rues your absence.

Second, your fb posts and comments over the last short while came together here, and I was hoping that would be. There's not enough being said about the Occupy movement/protest, and as much as can be said should be said.

Next, I'm puzzled by the sign being held up in the photo. This quote has never been undeniably attributed to Jefferson, and it also seems to have an ambiguous message in this new "movement". Those who don't work could be construed as bankers or as those who need social assistance. And that's a whole can of worms.

Anyway, this movement needs something much more simple as a slogan to drive it on, something like, "Make love, not war."

Super Hub, Chris, as always. Glad you are getting the message out there/here. ~Sherri


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Hi Sally, re. the pic; only good picture I have from the night I went there. So it is selected by default.

Yes, it's been a long time since I was here.


Petra Vlah profile image

Petra Vlah 5 years ago from Los Angeles

Christoph dear,

I am just as mad as you are; I started a thread in the political forum “Blaming the victims and calling them names” – please check it out.

What is going on right now is the consequence of the total outrage and frustration of people that finally waked up and said: enough is enough and we will not take it anymore – it was about time I would say.

We the 99% are paying for the greed and incompetence of a few CRIMINALS who brought the international financial system at the brink of collapse. While the criminals are walking free and use their golden parachute to land safe and live in luxury, the rest of us – the victims of their mess – are being called names and arrested for blocking the traffic and inconveniencing the fat cats.

Too bad that this most needed movement got out in the wrong foot and totally absurd and puerile demands were being made giving the establishment a chance to attack us and defend their position. I just hope and pray that a true leader will emerge and that the movement will get organized and bring forth a well thought and coherent set of demands.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Hi Petra, Nice to see you. I'm not sure what you mean by getting off on the wrong foot, but I agree that making specific demands is not a way to go. I think in New York they have settled down and hopefully, a true leader will emerge. Band aids on specific problems won't work any longer. A complete overhaul is needed. And not just in America. The whole world will need to change, IMHO.


Sally's Trove profile image

Sally's Trove 5 years ago from Southeastern Pennsylvania

Yes, it is the whole world...words from India:

http://shalinikagal.hubpages.com/hub/Democracy-Has...


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Thanks for sharing Shalini's story!


Paraglider profile image

Paraglider 5 years ago from Kyle, Scotland

Hi Christoph - I am delighted to see this protest movement taking hold at last. This is exactly what we were hoping to see when we started writing about bloodless revolutions and dropout nations. It took longer than I expected for people to waken up to what was happening to them. I suppose the austerity measures to pay for the bailouts had to start to really hurt first. But it's here and is not going to go away. Vive le revolution!


Shalini Kagal profile image

Shalini Kagal 5 years ago from India

Guess it had to happen, Christoph. For too long, the majority in every democratic country has been made to pay and pay - for others and for a small group pf power-hungry politicians and their playthings - I include war as one of them! Guess this is the last straw and we have to take back what is rightfully ours. Constitutions begin with 'We the people...' and we need to claim our rights back! Great hub....and thanks for the link, Sally's Trove :)


Amanda Severn profile image

Amanda Severn 5 years ago from UK

So much has changed in the last few years, and at such a thundering pace. The financial crisis was perhaps the tipping point in many respects, but the fall-out from that crisis is really beginning to bite now, and people are waking up from their technology induced slumber, and rubbing their eyes in amazement. You're right to say that the traditional methods to make change happen are no longer available to us. Politicians are too often in the pockets of the corporations, and even decent, honest, caring congressmen and women, have little chance against the ravening, greedy maws of the corporate machine.

Change needs to happen, but even the 99% are incapable of bringing it about because they are not acting as a single entity. They are splintered into thousands of special interest groups, and they cannot act because they are too small and insignificant. Indignation is not in itself a solution.

I have always believed that the change we need will never be delivered from the top down. It must come from the bottom up. If people blame the banks, then they should join a credit union, and if there isn't one locally, then form one. If people don't like the supermarket chains, they should make the effort to buy from local businesses and farmers markets. There is no point in complaining about corporatism without acting to change it, and that is within all our power.


CJStone profile image

CJStone 5 years ago from Whitstable, UK

This is fantastic Christoph, it makes this old rebel's heart stir with passion again. I'm so glad the protest movement - which is a world-wide phenomenon - is taking hold in the United States at last, and that people are beginning to wake up to the grand fraud that the financial industry (so-called) actually is. I'd be interested to read your on-going reports from the front line in "Occupy St Louis".


sideline 5 years ago

Christoph

As one of the so called "worthless eaters "

Great hub..

Peace


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 5 years ago from Central Oklahoma

I was soundly chastised in 2008 for being against bailing out the banks "too big to fail" and Wall Street. I thought doing so was the wrong way to go then, and for precisely the reasons "Occupy [insert location]" is happening now. Had financial institutions been allowed to fail then, we would already be 2-3 years into a solution, not just now waking up to the damage the bailout *really* did to everyone BUT the criminals responsible for the crisis.

Personally, I prefer the slogan "Not class warfare, but war on the 1%". ;D


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Paraglider: Yes. The first night I went down to the protest (it was the first night the Police had said they would evict people from the Park) I couldn't help making the connection with Dropout Nation. There were only 100 people there that night, but now it's in the hundreds. The next night, the Police came and gave us one more day. The next day, ten were arrested for things like loitering, but they were kept in Jail for nearly 24 hours. Now, the Police show up and tell everyone to leave the park, and they do, packing up their tents, supplies, signs, etc. But they don't go far, just to the sidewalks around the Park, then at 6am when the curfew ends, they all move, en masse, back into the park. Quite a thing to see. I don't think it will go away so easy this time. Everytime a politician tries to spin it to make us look bad, every time a cop hits someone anywhere, we come back double.

Shalini: Yes, I include war too, especially the Iraq war, which was supposedly waged because Iraq had weapons of mass destruction, but they didn't and the President and Cheney knew they didn't. But they did what regimes have been doing since time immorial; when you need to divert attention away from home and the failings of a regime (The World Trade Center, of which they had warnings they did not heed), then start a war on foreign soil. It's criminal.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Amanda: I think the protest will begin to get more focus, and a leader will arise from the masses. But at least now, they are already looking at us. We have gotten their attention no matter how much the mainstream has tried to sweep us under the carpet. This revolution, like Greece, is the first one with children of the Internet. We don't need THEIR media. We have our own, and we know how to use it.

Hi CJ: Thanks for coming by. As a long time defender of the people and a critic of the machinations of governments, I can imagine you get a special satisfaction from seeing what is going on. It's nice that people are listening. I think there are many more like me, who have had these feeling for a long time, but have not done anything about them. I will keep yo posted regarding our little bit in St. Louis. I'm going tonight and taking massive amounts of water and cups for the people, but in big gallon jugs, not little bottles which are themselves a huge corporate fraud.

JamaGenee: I like that slogan. I think I'll make a poster featuring it. Yes, we should have let them fail, but at least-certainly-brought many of them to justice so those left to pick up the pieces wouldn't continue business as usual.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

@ sideline: Thanks for the comment.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 5 years ago from Central Oklahoma

Christoph, this is exactly why Corporate America is working so hard to limit our access to the internet. Never before have people all over the world been able to communicate with each other in real time, and/or report with pix and video atrocities that in the past could be easily shoved under the carpet by its perps.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Yes, and that makes me think of Homeland Security, which is basically an excuse to spy on us, deny us our rights, control us, and, limit our use of the internet (though I'm not sure they have specifically used Homeland Security and Internet together, they probably will if they have to.)


Anarchos profile image

Anarchos 5 years ago from Texas

Nice post, although I take issue with decrying genetically modifying crops as a bad thing. Otherwise, I agree with the sentiment. I disagree with a previous comment about how the quote (whether Jefferson said it or not) could be construed. It is quite clear, when people who can and do work are plundered to support those who can and won't the government becomes a thief rather than a protector.

I am encouraged by all these protests (both Occupy and Tea Party). Regardless of ideology we have to sidestep our entrenched institutions to get real results (I am concerned, however, about several established groups moving into these protests with their particular agendas. It's important that it remain a truly grass roots movement). Keep up the good work.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Anarchos - My issue with genetically engineered crops is that there's no proof that they aren't harmful. They haven't been sufficiently tested. Same with synthetic hormones in milk. It's a fact that the U.S. is the only country that allows these things in their food supply, and the U.S. has soaring rates of Juvenile Diabetes, food allergies,autism, and on and on, where other countries do not. The director of the St. Louis chapter of the American Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation told me this personally, though there is no proof it's the food. They will only say it's environmental and are searching for the cause. It should be proven safe first. That's all.

Thanks for the comment.


Twilight Lawns profile image

Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

Welcome back Chris. It is great to see you with us again, but I must admit that I feel a frisson of disquiet when I read the comments to this hub. There is a lot of polarity in what is being said, and I will not qualify my remarks, but I find it disturbing to read and to be aware that the US government is looked on as it is by its citizens... perhaps by those citizens who obviously feel disenfranchised.

Instead of blaming just one group of people why isn’t there a bit more solidarity for, and concerning, the most recent "light of the Western World" Mr Obama, who until only recently was elected to discover (not surprisingly) that the Republicans cannot see past their rich and privileged noses to offer a united front against the bankers, and as you also know, the greedy people who borrowed and borrowed from those Banks and institutions knowing that there was no possible way that they could ever repay those loans.

It isn't just a small group of people who build castles on sand, Chris, but all of us who thought that the gravy train was here to stay. I’m sorry about all the metaphors, but solidarity seems to be the main strength of the “wicked” oligarchs. As one of your commenters said, there are too many splinter groups and to many selfish interests,

Ask most people in this country, and I ask your forgiveness for being on the wrong side of the Pond, but “A Leader” is there for you, if you would only use him to the best of his abilities.

Call me ingenuous, shoot me down in flames, tell me to mind my own business, but you’re not going to have a social revolution, so work out something that will work, but work it out with the legislature, and just think how many conspiracy theories have raised their laughable heads just in the comments to this hub.

And no! I’m not a born again, loony upper middle class or aristocratic landowner... I’m a socialist who does not like wealth and privilege if it is used badly.

Errr... Did I say, “Welcome back?” I still mean it, and I missed your brilliant writing.

Ian


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Sorry. I just wrote a long response when my cat walked across my keyboard and erased it. I'm not going to redo it right now. Maybe later.

It wasn't angry.

Thanks for commenting.


ko0lkyle 5 years ago

Thank you for an incredibly interesting hub! I really enjoyed reading through as I am a supporter of our Supporters. I wrote a hub this afternoon, Support Occupy Wall Street, which I hope will also help to spread the word with maybe a different perspective. Thank you again and great writing!


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Twilight Lawns: Hey, nice to see you too.

You make a lot of good points. People seem to expect there to be a specific focus, a cohesive set of "demands," for lack of a better word, and it's true that is needed. But we need to remember that this started with 10 students camping out in a park. It wasn't planned with documents, an outline, or any type of organizational cohesiveness at all. it would be nice if it had been, but it wasn't. It's easier to tame a baby tiger raised in captivity than after it is released and gone a little wild. I think focus will come (hopefully sooner rather than later) and a leader will arise from the masses.

Another problem is the protesters (we) are trying not to be exclusionary; come one, come all, and bring your gripes with you. This only contributes to the hodge podge nature of the movement and probably weakens it. But can we pick one issue? Will that effect change? No, the system is way more screwed up than that.

We also are not blameless. We have bought the products that have been outsourced to third world countries because they're cheaper. We continue to consume way more than our fair share of energy. But being green and conscientious costs more, and we don't have money.

AS for Obama, I voted for him and I still back him, but feel let down by him at the same time. He has given in too much to the republican congress--which is, truly, the whipping boy of wall street. I want a President who will stand up to them. Yell a little. Raise the passions of the people. But sadly, that isn't how things are done in America. I want to see some fighting not unlike your Parliament (is that who does all the yelling?) I think he's starting to get it a little, and I hope he becomes more emboldened when he hears the people speaking out and realizes that he is not alone; that he has not been abandoned.

As for conspiracy theories, I can see how you would say that about my statement regarding Homeland Security and the Patriot Act. It was a poor choice of words on my part. Instead of saying, "...which is basically an excuse...", I should have written, "which has allowed them to." It has. Whether they intended it or not, it did, they have used it as such, and that is a fact. Not a theory at all.

Ditto for my statements about the food supply. While it can't be stated definitively that our soaring rate of Juvenile diabetes, autism, etc, etc, is caused by the food, it is true that your country or no others--none of whom allow these things in their food--have the same soaring rates as us. And the bad things started at the same time we started allowing these things in our food. You may not call that a conspiracy, but is the corporations getting their way with the FDA. You don't have to be Einstein to make the connection.

Nor am I so sure about not having social revolution. This movement has spread worldwide, including London. http://occupylondon.org.uk/`

Nice to see you, Twilight.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 5 years ago from Central Oklahoma

More good points, Christoph. Besides the dangerous substances in the U.S. food supply that no other country allows, I can't help but think we are also over-medicated by the medical profession. It became worse after BigPharma was allowed to advertise its wares ad nauseum on TV. If a viewer wasn't aware of the condition or disease these ads purport to fix, they sure became quickly aware of it and probably had *some* of the symptoms. Naturally, they'll mention the drug on their next visit to the Doctor, who's more than happy to prescribe it even if it's not relevant to that particular patient. Cha ching...

Never mind the side effects or adding entirely new chemicals to the mix already in their bodies from "tainted" food and other prescriptions they're already taking. Cha ching...cha ching... That so many never question the toll on their health while Monsanto and BigPharma laugh all the way to the bank is mind-boggling!


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Yeah, I watch those commercials and think, "Whoa, I have that! Guess I need some drugs." You don't get heartburn anymore...you have acid reflux.

and a former Monsanto executive is now the Food Czar of the FDA. Geez...they were in bed together before, but they're not even wearing condoms now!


Candie V profile image

Candie V 5 years ago from Whereever there's wolves!! And Bikers!! Cummon Flash, We need an adventure!

I am all 'but one'.. and in union with many other 'ones'... So dear politions: hear us and hear us well!

Thanks Chris, many many thanks!

Hugs!


Jewels profile image

Jewels 5 years ago from Australia

The bloodless revolution_bring it on please. I'm standing tall with those of the 99% willing to get mad and demand we have our lives back.

That 1% includes responsibility for the Monsanto GMO cancer disempowering honest vulnerable farmers and poisoning our food supply; Chevron's disgraceful shirking of responsibility over the Amazon pollution, and the continual drilling for their profits at the expense of pristine oceans and waterways; Coal Seam Gas mining at the risk of endangering our most precious commodity - water; The allowance of 1 billion hungry people in the world because profits mean more than human lives.

This small fraction of the 99%, me, is so happy that people are becoming as mad as hell.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Hugs to you, my dear.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Me too, Jewels (and nice to see you by the way.) So much damage is done in the name of "profits," it has not only polluted our oceans, forests and atmosphere, but our minds as well. Here's to the 99% who are, now at least, thinking clearly.


gamergirl profile image

gamergirl 5 years ago from Antioch, TN

I'm a part of Occupy Asheville. Glad to see this article, and the comments.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Hey, Gamergirl. Go Asheville. It's encouraging to see it in so many places. Thanks for visiting.


Anarchos profile image

Anarchos 5 years ago from Texas

Regarding GMC's and their health issues, I believe that has more to do with our consumption patterns than anything else. We have an abundance of food and indulge ourselves in it.

Meanwhile, GMC's with inherent pesticide and drought resistant qualities and higher crop yields are helping to feed poor people across Africa and Asia. Given the DDT scare I'm hesitant to condemn GMC's too quickly.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Anarchos - I sincerely hope you are correct. At one time, I was a strong proponent, but lately, questions have arisen.


Jewels profile image

Jewels 5 years ago from Australia

I have to interject Anarchos, Genetically Modified Crops do not have higher yields and in India Monsanto has managed to endanger repeat yields of any GMO crop, so poor people are being taken advantage of because they are having to repeatedly purchase seeds which yield less. And the GMC's are becoming resistant to pesticides, so are the weeds! In 3rd generation rats the results of GMO feed are finally becoming apparent - yes malformation. You line up GMC in a cattle feed lot next to non GMC and the cows will go to the non-GMC. They know what is poison and what is not. We are the senseless yobbos who are told GMC's will save the world - NOT.

Brave New World is here and I'm part of the 99% who is getting madder than hell.

For unbiased scientific studies on GMC's I suggest the Institute for Responsible Technology as a good source of information.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Well, I have to agree with Jewels. In addition, Monsanto's business practices are horrid. They sue farmers for millions simply for using GMO seeds leftover from the previous year instead of buying new.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 5 years ago from Central Oklahoma

Monsanto got egg on its face a few years back for suing the owner of a bookshop in a mall for supposedly using the previous year's leftover seeds. Problem was, Monsanto's guy on the ground didn't do his homework. The book seller wasn't a farmer, had absolutely NO connection to farming, had never purchased seeds of any kind from Monsanto, and won an extremely nice settlement from the Big M for pain and suffering, legal fees, and M's overzealous business practices. ;D


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Good story. I like to see the powerful get theirs when their only motivation is profit. Whatever happened to giving the customer good value, instead of gouging them for every penny you can pry from their cold, dead hands.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 5 years ago from Central Oklahoma

Good value means a smaller bottom line, and a smaller bottom line means stockholders will complain. Oh, and some CEO would have to put off ordering that new jet...


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

...and a big fat bonus.


Tom Koecke profile image

Tom Koecke 5 years ago from Tacoma, Washington

Hey Christoph, good to see you. Your article is powerful in that it includes a not-so-subtle example of grave thought. People are angry for many different reasons, but the grave thought of anger is creating a mass so large that those in power feel it must be dealt with.

As a driver often in the Seattle area, I see the numbers growing in this protest. I applaud their efforts.

The real reform will come, however, when we gravely use our real power to affect corporate bottom lines. I hope someday to see Wal-Marts boarded up, and people driving in circles to find parking spots at small, locally owned stores and shops. Only then will the message be loud and clear.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 5 years ago from Central Oklahoma

I thought it went without saying that the jet was paid for with the big fat bonus.

As for Wal-Marts being boarded up, this is going to happen with or without Occupy Wall Street. Sam's grandkids are already seeing a drop in sales, not from a conscious decision by consumers to shop locally, but because so many can no longer buy anything but absolute necessities they can grow or make themselves. It's the Greedy Grandkids' own fault really. W-M is the largest employer on the planet, pioneered using less-than-a-living wage and sending American jobs overseas to shave the bottom line to enrich themselves, and those pigeons are finally coming home to roost.


Jewels profile image

Jewels 5 years ago from Australia

I really liked Amanda's and Tom's comments above. To accommodate change we do it from the bottom up and change the way we do things. Don't support the banks, don't support the corporations (I know that's hard when we need gas for our cars) but bit by bit find ways to make a difference. If 99% of the world made one change in favor of the 99% and not the 1% we can make a dent.

In 2010 I only filled my petrol tank 4 times. Most places I went I walked. My main shopping is done at our local farmers market. It all counts.


SJKSJK profile image

SJKSJK 5 years ago from delray beach, florida

Right on. Its about time someone took on Wall Street.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

I agree. Do what you can, and bit by bit, we will chip away at the marble statue of the corporate mindset. when we hurt their wallets, that will effect change.


Debby Bruck profile image

Debby Bruck 5 years ago

Dear Christoph ~ Just look at this great crowd of Hubbers that have gathered around to talk about this issue effecting all of us. Many who don't watch the news on TV or radio or check out internet news can't help but hear OWS ring when they surf around hubpages.

Thanks to Paraglider, Sally's Trove, Shalini Kagal, Amanda Severn, CJStone, JamaGenee, Jewels, gamergirl, Tom Koecke, Anarchos, Candie V, SJKSJK, ko0lkyle, and Twilight Lawns for caring enough to put in some "change" ~ your two cents worth. Hopefully, in the coming months we will have some action items in addition to the protest that are clearly springing up around the nation. There's bound to be a gathering in an area near you.

New York City acts as the pivotal point. You graphic photo, even though have a double entendre of meaning stands out. One thought really touched me in your Hub, the fact that we may be writing blogs, doing on-line petitions, sending in donations to worthy organizations, meeting for tea and coffee to discuss the troubles of the day, but the problem stems from our representatives not really listening to what's happening. They can't just filibuster, pass bills that benefit the corporations, wealthy or Congress, without neglecting the masses and their situation.

A great problem in the country comes from the poor quality of education of our children, the two-wager households that can supervise and provide quality childcare, the loss of income as we have entered the global economy and compete against other nations, and mostly the loss of our individual freedoms and rights to select our form of healthcare, breath clean air, eat natural foods, have pure running tap water, and renewable energy sources.

This country had a chance to redirect their resources in the 1960's and 1970's. We had a chance to invest in the people's ingenuity and technological advances. Instead, we pumped up the status quo and put control into monopolies and corporate power.

How can we deconstruct what was build with a poor underpinning? In a way, what happened to the twin-towers in NYC can be a metaphor for the country. I'm not saying to blow it up, rather to put a well thought out plan for investing in the future of America, the children, education that provides needed careers, and enables the people to dream again.

PS I linked this page to my OccupyWallstreet Hub. Keep up the activity. We're behind you as the country sorts out how to move forward.

Blessings,

Debby


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Debbie: Thank you for the sober and intelligent comment. I could write a lengthy reply, but truly, I think what you have written speaks for itself. I will visit your hub later this evening and comment there. Thanks.


Jewels profile image

Jewels 5 years ago from Australia

I hope you don't mind Christoph I want to add a note of globalism to the Wall Street protests. As you know I am not an American but have many US friends and I am aware of your third world debt, unemployment, broken health system and of course the corruption of Wall Street; there is brevity in this list of ailments.

World wide there are protests based on the corruption and greed of the 1%. For real change to be made the mindset has to be wider than the shores of the USA.

Through the Avaaz organization (Avaaz.org) (Avaaz stands for voice by the way) there is a global rising up of support for the Wall Street protests, from Madrid to Jerusalem. If you are not part of this organization I highly recommend it. And currently they are requesting members contact the mayor of NYC as they are planning to have the crowds disbanded. Here is the link including phone numbers http://www.avaaz.org/en/emergency_callin_to_stop_e...

We live in interesting times and one where the bloodless revolution is afoot. We can make a difference.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Yes, we are aware of the same activities occurring in other countries. I agree with you, the need is global, and word is spreading like wildfire here about Boomberg evicting the Occupy Wall Street protesters tomorrow morning at 7am. I have already signed a petition, though I don't know what good a petition will do. If they evict them, I predict massive protests exploding across the country, and I think it's quite possible tomorrow may erupt in violence--at least in New York. It has been a peaceful protest so far, but I don't think that means we're going to let them push us around.


Jewels profile image

Jewels 5 years ago from Australia

They work, and it worked. The eviction has been postponed. One of the major impulses of the protests is to stay peaceful. There are reports of planted rioters trying to cause trouble and there are warnings about this via the Zeitgeist movement on FB today. Such an interesting time.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 5 years ago from Central Oklahoma

I don't think Bloomberg had much of a choice but to cancel the eviction. To thumb your nose at a small group of protesters is one thing, but to do it to several thousand with the whole world watching is quite another. tee hee ;D


Amanda Severn profile image

Amanda Severn 5 years ago from UK

Here's another link which might be useful:

http://moveyourmoneyproject.org/


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

240,000 signed the petition. The protesters marched en masse to City Hall to deliver it, found out Bloomberg was dining out at a fancy restaurant nearby, they marched there instead. Must have been quite a sight to see that many people outside the restaurant all of a sudden. Has anybody heard a figure on how many people went to the park last night?


stayingalivemoma profile image

stayingalivemoma 5 years ago from Tempe, Arizona

Chris, I'm mad as hell too and I will be bookmarking this hub, tweeting it, sending it to digg, reddit, facebook and sharing with my followers. Voted up, awesome, useful, interesting and beautiful!


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Thankyou, stayingalivemoma. I appreciate it!


evvy_09 profile image

evvy_09 5 years ago from Athens, AL

I haven't been following politics for a long time. Just trying to live my life and make things better for my family. But then so is everyone and if we don't come together to improve it, no one will do it for us.

My husband and I went to the Occupy Huntsville meeting yesterday. We were both disapointed that so few (about 100+) showed up.

When we got home, my husband started looking up past presidential debates. Here's a link to one between Reagan and Carter over 30 years ago. Any issues sound familar?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8YxFc_1b_0&feature...

Just further proof that it's up to the people to improve things and no one else.

Great hub and I will be sharing it :)


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

evvy-Yes, the first night I attended in St. Louis there were also only about 100...I was disappointed too. It was early days, though, and it has grown and hopefully, will continue to do so. Yes again, unless we stand up, nothing will change.


qlcoach profile image

qlcoach 5 years ago from Cave Junction, Oregon

Yes the system is broken. Good venting. Yes we need to take a stand. I've come up with an approach that I call passing forward our "blue fox" moments. Please let me know what you think. Peace and Light...Gary.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Thanks, qt coach. Nice to meet you.


Shelly McRae profile image

Shelly McRae 5 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

Excellent hub. And I believe it is a good sign that people are beginning to articulate their causes, be it environmental, financial or a specific social issue. It becomes more difficult to dismiss the disenfranchised when they can definitively state the problems they wish to help resolve.


robie2 profile image

robie2 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

I am so on the same page with you and in awe of how you just laid it all out -- this is one terrific hub. The tipping point has been reached and people all over the world are on the move. This is not going away soon and as usual, the 1% are so out of touch, they haven't gotten the memo yet-- but they will-- they will.


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Shelly: Yes, I think it's becoming more focused everyday, and I think the Establishment/wall street--with their propaganda and attempt to minimize or discredit the movement only galvanize us further.

robie2: Hi Robie. Nice to see you. And as more unions and famous people join the movement (Pete Seeger and Arlo Guthrie last week) the 1%'s efforts to deny our existence or importance will fall shorter and shorter.


doodlebugs profile image

doodlebugs 5 years ago from Southwest

Great Hub. What is unfortunate is that more than half of the 99% have been brainwashed to believe everything that the corporatocracy tells them. The Wall Street protesters seem to be getting slammed on all sides now, thanks in part to the Fox propaganda machine, and their own lack of organization.


robie2 profile image

robie2 5 years ago from Central New Jersey

I'm blogging my little heart out over this issue over at my Political Packrat blog-- I tend to do only evergreen stuff on Hubpages-- but this comments thread is just wonderful and as Debby Bruck said -- look at all the hubbers who are gathering around to discuss this.

Scott Olsen has galvanized the movement and given it a focus it needed. The energy grows every day-- this really is the start of something very big and it is so exciting to be helping to man the virtual barricades.

s

To the virtual barricades! We are the 99%


Mighty Mom profile image

Mighty Mom 5 years ago from Where Left is Right, CA

Every little victory counts. Bank of America backing down from $5 fees for using your ATM card. It sounds small, but it's significant!

Every customer who closes their big-bank account (even if theirs is but a small bank account) is sending a message.

If the only thing critics can say is the OWS movement lacks focus in our demands (love the dancing on the bull's back graphic, btw) they must really be floundering

It feels good to be mad as hell and know we're (collectively) doing something about it!

Hubbing about it is positive action.

Thanks, CR! MM


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Hi, Mighty Mom! How nice to see you here. Yeah, focus is definitely going to become more and more of an issue. Everyone want every thing put in a little box and wrapped up with a nice bow. There are so many damn problems. You're right, we can't fix them all right off the bat, and I hope it gets down to what is for me the primary issue; get corporation out of government. I think the movement does accomplish a very important thing; that we know what shenanigans they are up to and we're not going to just be your little sheep any longer. Hopefully, that will inspire some true leaders--people who know the difference between right and wrong and to hell with everything else--to enter politics. They will have our support. They must cater to us. Not their parties. Not the corporations. Not to their donors. TO US. A committed President can't accomplishment anything if he doesn't have the backing in Congress and the Senate. And at the local level as well. As you say, every little victory counts!


Mighty Mom profile image

Mighty Mom 5 years ago from Where Left is Right, CA

A committed President can't accomplish anything if there are people in positions of power in Congress whose sole objective is to get him out of office.

That, to me, is criminal.

I expect another big sweep of Congress in 2012.

So agree with you -- business should not own government.

Government in and of itself is needed. But must serve the people not the money interests.

My state (CA) and city (Sacramento) are both so f'd up.

MM's current motto: seethe nationally, spew locally:-)!!

Keep up the good fight out there in the midwest, pardner.

We're on the side of right here!

MM


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

I Love your motto! I'm gonna steal it.


molometer profile image

molometer 5 years ago

Hi Cristophm

Good hub about probably the most important shift it vales in generations.

The revolt has spread far and wide. Enough with this terrible state of affairs.

We need to sort these toerags(that is the most polite I can be) out once and for all.

Here is my contribution to the debate. I am a lecturer in economics and studied at Middlesex University back in the 80's

A solution from London:

http://molometer.hubpages.com/hub/Debt-Crisis-Solu...


Christoph Reilly profile image

Christoph Reilly 5 years ago from St. Louis Author

Yes, many have come out of the woodwork. People are doing what they can. As Robie stated, she's blogging her little heart out. That's the kind of stuff I can do too, and post articles that tell the truth on Facebook, just to help spread the truth; not just what mainstream news tells us.


leann2800 5 years ago

Great job! I love that picture and the message in your hub.


progressivist profile image

progressivist 5 years ago

I too have been supporting and writing about the Occupy movement and various issues connected with the concentration of wealth, and this is an excellent hub. I think the most valuable thing I got out of the movement so far is that I am not the only one who feels this way . . . I live in a Red state and every ill is laid at the feet of the Democrats (or progressives) and people have their eyes closed and refuse to admit that this goes beyond party--even beyond country. The recent coordinated shutdowns simply go to show that it is working.

BTW the NYPD used LRADs (sonic cannons) on the crowd. Since when are military-style weapons necessary against sleeping people?


blondepoet profile image

blondepoet 4 years ago from australia

Christoph my petunia blossom the hot hub is up and running I hope I did you justice, can you believe it took like 12hours aghhh, writing about men is hard work lol xx

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working