Time Management Skills: Don't Waste Time for Others

Does this describe you?


Everyone knows people who always show up fifteen minutes late—for everything. When they arrive, they wave their arms with a flourish and either quickly apologize or make a joke of their lack of punctuality. We’ve also met folks who are quick to arrange a get-together, promising a good time for all. An hour before we’re supposed to meet them, they call to tell us something came up, but they hope to meet with us “again” soon. And, there are also folks that schedule a meeting but spend half their time on the phone with someone else. What do these people have in common? They waste our time. Are you one of these people?

An important aspect of time management that can help us organize in a dramatic if indirect way is consideration for others. If we are respectful of a friend or colleague’s time, they will be more thoughtful of our own schedule. If we are unconcerned with wasting someone else’s time, we will be accorded the same courtesy. Our personal life will suffer and our business will lose customers.

There are several simple things we can do to save time for people we deal with regularly. Following these suggestions will allow us to create a favorable impression on everyone we meet. We will not only be more efficient in conducting our business, we will be viewed as courteous and in control of our life.


The look of wasting time

Are you wasting time?
Are you wasting time?
...always missing the bus?
...always missing the bus?
...making everyone wait for you?
...making everyone wait for you?
Or, perhaps you're on time but unfocused?
Or, perhaps you're on time but unfocused?
Are you a story-teller, unwittingly putting everyone to sleep?
Are you a story-teller, unwittingly putting everyone to sleep?
Respect everyone's time.  Be early and be focused.
Respect everyone's time. Be early and be focused.

Recommendations for respecting others' time


1. Arrive slightly early for everything. This is a fundamental rule of time management. If we can arrive at an appointment at all, we can arrive on time. Being late is an insult and can be construed as arrogance. Tardiness tells our friends or clients that we don’t value them or their business. A lack of punctuality conveys the impression that anything we were doing is more important than anything our acquaintances could be doing—a remarkable display of conceit.

If we must be late, we should never make light of our tardiness. Don’t offer a witty one-liner in explanation, as this suggests we’re late all the time and have armed ourselves with an array of cute rationalizations (trust me, the folks we stand up are not laughing with us). Never use “I’m running late” as an excuse; this is a virtual confession that we’ve wasted someone’s time for no good reason at all. Conversely, a personal crisis described in great detail might garner sympathy for our situation but suggests we have no control over our life. If we are a few minutes early, we don’t need excuses.

2. Don’t let others make us late. We will fail to be early (or even on time) if we allow others to make us late. A key aspect of keeping others’ schedules is insisting that friends and acquaintances allow us to respect our own agenda. We mustn’t be angry or impatient if someone unwittingly wastes our time—we should gently inform them we have other things to accomplish. It’s okay to have a lot on our plate but if we are comfortable wasting our own time, others will be happy to help us do it.

3. Respect others’ schedules. If we know someone must be at work by 8:00 AM, we shouldn’t make them late by showing up at their door at 7:45 AM. If they risk being late to talk with us, they will be extremely irritated if our visit is unimportant. Some people do this intentionally, either to keep interactions brief or to claim in good conscience that they tried to reach someone and failed, while for others it is a form of egotism to impose their schedule upon others. If we are unconcerned with making someone else late, our lack of courtesy will be reciprocated.

4. Don’t become difficult to contact. Does our phone always go to voice mail? Is our business phone larded with superfluous telephone options, emphasized with a “listen carefully because our options have changed” warning? When we do answer the phone, are we often unavailable, offering a hasty greeting and promises to call back later? If this describes you, save time for others by becoming more accessible. This does not mean we are obliged to take calls 24 hours a day, but we should create small blocks of time when friends and business acquaintances can reach us if they need to. If someone knows when they can successfully contact us, we have spared them the frustration of repeated messages, phone tag, or trying to track us down using any means at their disposal.

5. Communicate efficiently. Learn to speak clearly and to the point. When talking with someone, don’t let the purpose of the visit be the last thing discussed. Finish business first, allowing whatever time is left for less important matters. This will also allow us to conclude a meeting in a casual, affable way.

Don’t talk incessantly. It is acceptable for a thought to remain unexpressed. Others may be too polite to tell us if we ramble, but we will soon discover people have “got to get going” when they think our next monologue is imminent. Natural story-tellers must maintain the awareness to know when an audience is willing to listen.

6. Become organized. We must take control of our life and not be at its mercy. Perhaps we feel justified when we are late for work or miss an important telephone call. After all, things happen and our friends and associates will surely understand. In truth, they do understand once or twice, but eventually we will be perceived as incapable of dealing with life. Take control and address problems efficiently in order to minimize distractions that affect interactions with others.

7. Don’t cancel meetings or get-togethers casually. If we make plans to meet with someone, we should keep them. If we arrange a get-together with an old friend, we need to be there. One of the worst, most blatant ways to misuse someone’s time is to cancel on them at the last minute. When we do this, we are wasting more than a few moments spent in idle chatter—we are killing an hour or two they graciously set aside specifically for us. It is not only disrespectful; it is insulting and won’t quickly be forgotten. If we say we’ll show up, we have to mean it!

8. Focus on others when with them. Do we interrupt family or friends to take a call or read a text message? Does multi-tasking too often divide our attention? It is impossible to compartmentalize our lives to the extent that nothing overlaps, but if our focus is not on the person we are interacting with, we’re wasting their time. In all likelihood, we are frustrating or angering them, as well. Offer undivided attention when meeting with someone, even if it is only for a short time. Once the purpose in meeting has been accomplished, distractions won’t hurt as much.


A little respect goes a long way


There is an overriding theme to these recommendations for respecting others’ time: each action step concerns how we conduct ourselves. We aren’t focusing on the other person but rather upon our own behavior. It’s unrealistic to seek change within anyone except ourselves. With this realization comes an important footnote: respecting the time and schedule of others is an act to be undertaken with courtesy. We won’t change someone else with words, so it is counterproductive to insult the story-teller or snap at someone trying to reach us while we’re conducting other business. Appropriate behavior will be reciprocated. Respect their time by respecting the person and don’t become a mean-spirited boor trying to change people; that is doing no one any favors.

Demonstrating respect for others benefits everyone. Accomplishing this allows us to be seen as courteous, understanding, and in control of our life. We will impress others with an efficiency they will attempt to match—at least when they are with us. Business associates will admire our work ethic and personal relationships will improve. All this can be gained, just by respecting others’ time.

Not a bad deal, is it?

A 2012 Update


It has been two years since I wrote this article, and I hoped it would be of use to folks with time management issues. There are not many occasions in my personal life at this stage where someone regularly wastes time or makes me late, but I have noticed with interest that it is a severe issue for many people in a work environment. I had a manager who frequently arrived late; it was not an issue because I was always there early and prepared for the day. I could not find it within myself to intentionally show up late and demonstrate the pitfalls of arriving for work at a leisurely pace with full confidence that someone else will step in to keep things going. Sadly, arriving early and preparing for the day even became part of my regular duties.

There are always staff members that struggle with punctuality, as well. They waste time for others because someone has to step in until they make it to work. Some race through the doorway at the very last moment, while others arrive late but armed with that convenient explanation. The hurried entrances and laundry list of explanations become irrelevant and managers lump them all together as unreliable employees.

It is not too late for anyone, however! It is possible for anyone to adopt habits that will allow them to manage their time effectively and not waste time for others. If the situations described here affect you, please take time to read and apply the information contained within this article. It really is about respect for others, and if you make use of the recommendations offered here, your friends and perhaps your employer will very likely be grateful.

Thank you for reading.


Early or late?

How often are you late for meetings and appointments?

  • Always. I'm never on time.
  • Frequently. Sometimes it's tough to get moving.
  • Sometimes. Things happen.
  • Rarely. I can usually make it on time.
  • Never. I'm always early.
See results without voting

Comments 50 comments

nearbuystore.com profile image

nearbuystore.com 6 years ago from Somewhere on the highway....

The only problem is most don't respect others that are always on time..and they come late...i guys its just me..maybe im a time freak or something


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

nearbuystore, thanks for reading. I doubt you are a time freak, and I suspect there are other issues at play if people around you are chronically late. And, of course, I guess there are some folks that will be always be late, no matter what you do.

I do believe there can be power struggles that manifest themselves through showing up on time, as if it is a sign of importance to be the last one in the room. I never feel as if I've won by making others wait for me--most of the time, I feel as if I've lost something. And so I show up on time.

Thanks for commenting, I appreciate your insight.

Mike


Susan Carter profile image

Susan Carter 6 years ago

What really makes me mad is when I'm on time and I'm forced to wait for the late arrivals. I might as well have been late myself! I like speakers or meeting leaders that start on time and don't care if others are late. They are showing respecting for themselves as well as the on-time people. Yes, it's a bit unnerving to have people come in late and make noise while you are talking, but perhaps the late comers will miss something and the consequence will finally get the idea through their thick heads. Whew. This is one of my pet peeves. Can you tell? Thanks for the info. Hopefully the people that need it will read it.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Susan, I appreciate your comments, and I can indeed see that it is a pet peeve. I am in agreement. I will show tolerance to folks who are late if they are not chronically late. The people that are never on time waste my time, and that does frustrate me. It is my hope that if I show enough respect to be on time and focused, others will show me the same consideration in return. My experiences have demonstrated this will happen, but of course--not with everyone.

Thanks again for reading.

Mike


Just A Voice 6 years ago

#5 Communicate Efficiently is one of my pet "corporate" peeves. I can't tell you how many times I've been in a meeting that has run HOURS long because someone felt the need to begin their part of the meeting by taking it all the way back to Adam & Eve, or decided to chase a rabbit and tell a few stories because whatever they were talking about reminded them of (fill in the blank).

A meeting is basically a waste of my precious work time...not that I'm so important...but that I have a lot of work and a meeting is cutting into that time of ACTUALLY working. If a meeting is needed, and don't get me wrong...they are needed, don't prolong the event!

Some people seem to think a meeting is a social event, a time to talk about every and anything. In the meantime, my work day is getting longer and longer, because I still have to do x y & z before I can go home.

We always have an agenda for our meetings, I know this because I usually put the agenda together. Then off we go, and someone decides this is a perfect time to air their grievances, someone else decides they need to explain to everyone everything that has happened since the beginning of our organization so everyone is UP TO DATE, someone else is reminded of a funny/scary/weird story that happened to them...on and on.

In the meantime the clock is ticking and the meeting that was suppose to only be for an hour has turned into a 3 hour meeting and nothing has really been decided...except, of course, that we need to have another meeting to discuss the things we barely touched on at this meeting.

I go outside, scream silently and inhale a ciggerette in a single inhale.

To be fair and honest, they are not all like that, thank God. But I could live without the ones that are!

Thank you for letting me vent. LOL Seems you have a penchant for writing things that make me flame up in righteous indignation. Hope this doesn't get me in as much trouble as the TP issue did!


mbwalz profile image

mbwalz 6 years ago from Maine

Great hub! I grew up with severe consequences to being late and must admit, I've had to work on relaxing a bit. But the one word that came up over and over again is respect.

Imagine the problems that would be solved if we lead our lives respectfully!


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Voice, thanks for reading. I don't think discussing staff meetings will have the same impact as the infamous TP issue, but I guess you never know.... I'm sure if we asked, Ghosty would be happy to come by and stir the pot.

Staff meetings have always been an especially dreaded event for me, as well. I worked for a company where the staff meetings became a badge of honor. Whenever someone was left out, the whined and complained until they were included in subsequent meetings, whether the meeting was relevant to their department or not. Eventually the size of the meetings swelled in size to unmanageable numbers, and as a result what originally was a 45 minute meeting swelled to almost 3 hours in length. Every brand of time-waster was represented, and it became a nightmare.

And yes, attending meetings is not an official job function, so the work doesn't go away while we're sitting there listening to someone ramble on.....

Well, thanks again. Hope everything is going well for you, and while I don't intend to raise your blood pressure with these hubs, I'm pleased to be writing about things you respond to with such----passion?

I appreciate your comments. Take care.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

mbwalz, thanks for reading. I was taught by my family to be early for everything, and being on time came naturally for me. A few of my closest friends when I was younger were always late to everything, and it really felt like they didn't respect me or my time by being late for everything. In my opinion, it really is all about respect, and the benefits will extend beyond punctuality.

Thanks for reading, I appreciate your input.

Mike


Paradise7 profile image

Paradise7 6 years ago from Upstate New York

Good hub, and I think things like this need to be said. It seems to me as I get a bit older that there are more inconsiderate people in the world...people are too polite to correct their social errors, so they become more common.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Paradise, thanks for reading. I do think lots of folks could spend more time considering how their actions affect others. It is easy to believe that something as simple as punctuality isn't a personal slap in the face to anyone, but on another level it is a slap in the face to everyone--everyone that has to wait on a late-comer to show up somewhere.

Thanks for your comments, as always I do appreciate them.

Mike


ThomasWMutherJr 6 years ago

REALLY! If you wanted to write a hub about my shortcomings you should warn a fellow first!

That was a joke. I'm really not quite SO self-centered to believe everything's about me. Still, as you are undoubtedly aware, tardiness has been a chronic problem with me. I'm not nearly as bad as I used to be, but I still need to improve. I'm sure you recall all of the basketball games we used to play, and there I would be, running in with 2 seconds to spare . . . or 10 minutes late. Once, sadly, we even forfeited a game due to this propensity of mine (on the other hand, I once drove 1325 miles--according to mapquest--in 26 hours just to get to a game on time).

Alas, my problems with disorganization have at various times resulted in major inconveniences for others--for example, missing a flight which resulted in a friend of mine waiting an extra 5 hours for me in the Denver Airport! or submitting that same friend (different time) to having to sit around and watch me do a load of laundry while we were on vacation because I didn't get around to doing it before leaving! Ugh!

Father forgive me for I have sinned--yea, verily.

But as I noted, my short-comings in this regard have lessened greatly, and I'm not quite the pain I used to be. But it remains an issue.

PS> I'm going down to Oklahoma City. Hopefully I'll get there before the opening tip-off ;-) Maybe I'll see you for the third round--unless Kruger has his revenge.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Tom! Long time no see! Wondered how you've been getting along. I think it's great you're heading to Oklahoma City--just like the old days.

When writing this, I had another friend of mine in mind more than you. When we got together, I used to insist he pick me up, because that way I could at least wait at my own home for him to show up late.

Gotta admit, there was a time when we were heading to my house after a city-league game. You were in front of me about a half-block. Just before we arrived, you took a left turn and disappeared for a half-hour before showing up at my house. Where did you go???? I asked Allen about it, and he said you just didn't want to show up first. Huh?????

I think a third-round game would be great. Kruger might want his revenge, but I'm not sure he will get it.

Hopefully Michigan State used up their revenge for 1986 by beating KU twice last year.


ThomasWMutherJr profile image

ThomasWMutherJr 6 years ago from Topeka, KS

Howdy.

Incidentally, this team did something the 1978 team (one of my all-time favorites) couldn't do--beat a good K-State team 3 times in one season. This might officially thrust them ahead of that earlier incarnation as one of KU's greatest teams--assuming they don't lose in one of the first 2 rounds.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Hey, Tom--you're right about KU, I was worried about K-State the third time, but I thought they wore out playing Baylor the night before--a benefit of playing the earlier game. Who knows? KU could get the Wildcats a fourth time if they both could crash the Final Four.

One of my biggest disappointments was that loss to K-State in 1978. I had two tickets to the Regional, which was played in Allen Field House. K-State lost to Missouri, who lost to Utah, sending them to the Regional. Utah had Tom Chambers, Danny Vranes, Jeff Judkins and Buster Matheney, but still....

Mike


ThomasWMutherJr profile image

ThomasWMutherJr 6 years ago from Topeka, KS

Yup! Those '78 Hawks were in great position to make it to the final four that year--IF they had simply gotten by K-State (there is NO way Missouri would have beaten them in the next game). That K-State loss, and the one to WSU 3 years later remain 2 of the biggest diappointments in my days as a KU fan.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

For me as well. Did that team have Mike Evans and Curtis Redding, or were they both gone by then? They must have had somebody decent in order to beat us....

That 78 team was one of the funnest of all the KU teams to watch.


drbj profile image

drbj 6 years ago from south Florida

Here's the best tip I ever heard, Mike, about how to conduct short staff meetings.

Have them in a room without chairs. Everyone stands. Guarantee the meeting will not be a long drawn-out affair.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

drbj, thanks for your comments. I like the idea of a meeting room with no chairs. Not only would meetings be shorter, I suspect there would be fewer of them, as well!

Thanks again.

Mike


hypnodude profile image

hypnodude 6 years ago from Italy

Usually I always follow point n.1, as you rightly say it's a matter of respect. And I'm not very happy with those who arrive late or make me to arrive late. Being on time also makes us to appear in a better light, so to speak. Very good hub Mike, as usual. Thumbs up. :)


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

hypnodude, thanks for your comments. You're correct, if we are on time, we present ourselves to others in a better way--we look to be in control of our lives. And I firmly believe it is a sign of respect to be on time, and a sign of disrespect to be late--at least chronically late.

Thanks so much for reading, you're always welcome here.

Mike


Ghost Whisper 77 profile image

Ghost Whisper 77 6 years ago from The U.S. Government protects Nazi War Criminals

I don't know how I missed this hub--don't remember getting an email on it...sorry. I am usually on time--I used to always be a bit late.

In the past-I always had problems with people showing up really, really late...I end up doing the opening work..it stinks!


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Hi Ghosty! Thanks for reading. It is particularly annoying when someone's tardiness adds to others' workload--I've experienced that, also. You're right, it stinks!!! That's the best way to put it.

Thanks so much for visiting, I always appreciate your comments and insights (and humor, also...).

Mike


Lady_E profile image

Lady_E 6 years ago from London, UK

A very important Hub. If a person turns up late more than once for a meeting, I already form my impression of them.

Having said that, thanks for the reminder - Being Organised. Sometimes, I could spend all Sunday not doing a lot becos I don't want to and Monday morning I'm running round looking for what to wear and iron. Then miss breakfast so I don't get in late. Need more discipline in that area.

Great Hub. :)


shazwellyn profile image

shazwellyn 6 years ago from Great Britain

Oh Mike... it hit true with me - Oh how I wish I could be on time! Im either incredibly early or late! Something gets in the way - tractors! Or Im held up by the kids... it is frustrating for me. If I could just work on my own, it woud be fine.

I bet things will be better when Im older!

Thanks for the reminder hub *blushes*


mod2vint profile image

mod2vint 6 years ago from Sunny Florida

Great Hub! I can't stand being late, it throws off my entire day. I also don't like being left waiting for others, it won't happen often before I leave that person behind. Its just plain common courtesy.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Lady_E, thanks for reading. You're absolutely correct that often initial impressions are made simply by showing up late. Being on time might not make a good impression, but being late can certainly make a bad one.

On the other side of the coin, I'm like you on a Sunday--it's very easy for me to put things off, and then Monday gets off to a bad start. I understand completely!

Thanks again for your comments.

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Shaz, I appreciate your comments. I find it interesting to hear you say that you're either very early or very late--usually we're either one or the other!

Tractors, huh? I was driving an old Chevy Vega one time that was on its last legs, and I was going so slow a tractor passed ME! I had the pedal to the floor, too!

If I were to ever do another hub about pet peeves, I think I would include tractors on the road during rush hour. I always get behind those guys!

Thanks again, I appreciate your stopping by!

Mike


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

mod2vint, thanks for reading. I'm with you--I will forgive if someone keeps me waiting once, but if it happens too often, well--who needs the aggravation? Punctuality is such a simple courtesy that means so much.

Thanks again.

Mike


billyaustindillon profile image

billyaustindillon 6 years ago

Exceelent hub - one of those things that can really be annoying - inconsiderate people - time is very precious.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Billyaustindillon, thanks for reading. Time is indeed precious as you say, and everyone should do their best not to waist it for others.

Thanks again.

Mike


rml 6 years ago

I was always taught to be early for everything. I do not expect everyone else to be early, but I do appreciate being on time. It is, as you say, a matter of respect and courtesy.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

rml, thanks for commenting. I was also taught to be early, and I do what I can. It is indeed a matter of courtesy.

Thanks again.

Mike


poetlorraine 6 years ago

I so enjoyed this hub, thanks for your lovely comments on my hubs too, i find them very encouraging,


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Thank you, Lorraine. The pleasure is all mine, and I appreciate your kind words.

Mike


prettydarkhorse profile image

prettydarkhorse 6 years ago from US

good tips and advices, respect is very important Mike, good job here, Maita


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Thank you, Maita. I appreciate your coming to visit. Respect is very important and goes a long way toward determining how we are perceived by others.

Thanks again.

Mike


RosWebbART profile image

RosWebbART 6 years ago from Ireland

When I moved from England to Ireland ; I almost went mad with the lack of good time keeping ; now I accept it and actually enjoy it! it's not so much to do with manners here ; it is seen as culturally acceptable; but I see as times progress it is getting less and less acceptable even in rural Ireland.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

RosWebb, thanks for commenting. You make an interesting observation by asserting that a lack of good time keeping is seen in softer terms in Ireland. It makes me extremely curious--what is accepted as the norm? Is five or ten minutes late okay? Fifteen or twenty? When does it cross the line and become an issue? Does this apply to professional gatherings as well as personal? I am aware that some areas are more tolerant to "running late" than others, but I'm curious as to what is acceptable.

Anyway, thanks again for reading.

Mike


Neil Ashworth profile image

Neil Ashworth 6 years ago from United Kingdom

Very nice Hub. Keep 'em coming!


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Neil, thanks for your comments and support, I appreciate it very much!

Mike


Business Writing Skills 6 years ago

Hey Mike! really Great work. Thanks a lot for providing us such wonderful information on Time Management Training. Keep update on..


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Business Writing Skills, thanks for reading. I appreciate your comments.

Mike


Csjun89 profile image

Csjun89 6 years ago

Excellent advice, especially on making sure other people respect your time!


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Csjun, thanks for reading. If we respect others' time, they will (usually) respect ours, but sometimes we have to make sure no one unintentionally interferes with things we must get done. It is usually easy to do, but we must be firm when others trample on our schedule.

Thanks again for reading.

Mike


Manna in the wild profile image

Manna in the wild 6 years ago from Australia

Brilliant. Do you mind if I make a link to this from http://hubpages.com/business/Time-Management-skill ?


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Manna, thank you for your kind words. Feel free to make the link to your hub, I am honored. Thanks again.

Mike


poetvix profile image

poetvix 6 years ago from Gone from Texas but still in the south. Surrounded by God's country.

Informative. I very much like it and if you do not mind plan to use this as a lesson in time management for my classe. Happy Hubbing!


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Poetvix, thanks for stopping by. I would not mind at all if you used this article in a time management lesson. Thanks for stopping by, I appreciate it.

Mike


Lorraine Arams 6 years ago

Hi, Mike - thanks for this post - lots of good points. My take on people showing up late is their desperate need to control others or declare themselves special. By being late, they think or know they have the upper hand - like a king or queen, they waltz in at their "leisure" and, thus, take over in a subtle way - people wait for them or when they come in, the meeting is interrupted. This interruption gives them a "stage". Somehow, they feel "noticed".

The best antidote is to start the meeting on time and not acknowledge late comers. Some managers I've known have locked the meeting door - anyone late misses the meeting.


Mike Lickteig profile image

Mike Lickteig 6 years ago from Lawrence KS USA Author

Lorraine, thanks for reading. You hit the nail right on the head--so many people use being late as a tool, a weapon, or as a symbol of their authority. It is very much about control, and I find it extremely arrogant. In a business environment, I am all for someone taking center stage by virtue of their ideas or accomplishments--anything else is just for show.

Thanks again for stopping by, I appreciate it a great deal.

Mike

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