Urban Farming: Anyone?

Inner-City Farms

1.San Francisco's New Victory Garden   Mayor Gavin Newsom helps Slow Food Nation plant the first edible garden at City Hall since 1943. During World War II, civilians across the country were encouraged to aid the war effort by growing their own food
1.San Francisco's New Victory Garden Mayor Gavin Newsom helps Slow Food Nation plant the first edible garden at City Hall since 1943. During World War II, civilians across the country were encouraged to aid the war effort by growing their own food
2. Farm of the Future?  Vertical farms, like this one envisioned in downtown Toronto, theoretically would bring food production into the heart of population centers.
2. Farm of the Future? Vertical farms, like this one envisioned in downtown Toronto, theoretically would bring food production into the heart of population centers.
3. Greig Cranna / The Food Project/ Boston Harvest  The Food Project in Boston grows nearly a quarter of a million pounds of food without chemical pesticides, donating half to local shelters and selling the remainder at farmers' markets.
3. Greig Cranna / The Food Project/ Boston Harvest The Food Project in Boston grows nearly a quarter of a million pounds of food without chemical pesticides, donating half to local shelters and selling the remainder at farmers' markets.
4. Tower of Food  Vertical farms like this one envisioned on the Chicago waterfront would grow food closer to where it is consumed, thus eliminating much of the fuel and transportation costs.
4. Tower of Food Vertical farms like this one envisioned on the Chicago waterfront would grow food closer to where it is consumed, thus eliminating much of the fuel and transportation costs.
5. Model of Self-Sufficiency  Seattle-based architecture firm Mithun designed this vertical farm so that it would not require any water from municipalities and would also use photovoltaic cells to produce nearly 100% of the building's electricity.
5. Model of Self-Sufficiency Seattle-based architecture firm Mithun designed this vertical farm so that it would not require any water from municipalities and would also use photovoltaic cells to produce nearly 100% of the building's electricity.
6. Powering Up a Sky Farm  A vertical-farm design by French architect Pierre Sartoux includes rooftop wind turbines to help power the enterprise and uses a light-shading skin that can be opened and closed to control exposure to the sun.
6. Powering Up a Sky Farm A vertical-farm design by French architect Pierre Sartoux includes rooftop wind turbines to help power the enterprise and uses a light-shading skin that can be opened and closed to control exposure to the sun.
7. Greig Cranna / The Food Project/Farming on the Roof  The nonprofit Food Project works to achieve both social and agricultural change by bringing together kids from diverse backgrounds to farm several lots in urban Boston.
7. Greig Cranna / The Food Project/Farming on the Roof The nonprofit Food Project works to achieve both social and agricultural change by bringing together kids from diverse backgrounds to farm several lots in urban Boston.
8.Robert Nickelsberg for TIMENext Back A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (and Other Stuff Too)  On the site of a former asphalt-covered playground in Brooklyn, N.Y., the Red Hook Community Farm provides job training to local teens.
8.Robert Nickelsberg for TIMENext Back A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (and Other Stuff Too) On the site of a former asphalt-covered playground in Brooklyn, N.Y., the Red Hook Community Farm provides job training to local teens.
9. Robert Nickelsberg for TIME/A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (and Other Stuff Too)
9. Robert Nickelsberg for TIME/A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (and Other Stuff Too)
10.Hydroponic High-Rise  Instead of filling a vertical farm with soil, plants could be grown indoors hydroponically with just the roots submerged in water, thus reducing the weight the structure needs to support.
10.Hydroponic High-Rise Instead of filling a vertical farm with soil, plants could be grown indoors hydroponically with just the roots submerged in water, thus reducing the weight the structure needs to support.
11. Scott Chernis / Slow Food Nation/From City Field to Fork  Food grown at San Francisco's City Hall will be donated to local food banks and meal programs for those with limited access to fresh produce.
11. Scott Chernis / Slow Food Nation/From City Field to Fork Food grown at San Francisco's City Hall will be donated to local food banks and meal programs for those with limited access to fresh produce.

A Farmer in the city

People, budget and lifetyle...I tagged these words to describe about this hub that will concentrate on farming.

Being part of an agricultural environment, it is saddening to see that people in the major cities in the Philippines or even in the United States are forgetting the backbone of each country's economy: and that's farming.

Through farming, we can feed millions of hungry people in our cities or even donate to those countries, like in Africa whose people are suffering from famine and hunger.

How about replacing your ornamental or flowering plants on the terrace and turning it into a house garden full of different types of vegetables. That will be called Urban Farming (http://www.urbanfarming.org/).

Urban Farming's mission is to create an abundance of food for people in need by planting gardens on unused land and space while increasing diversity, educating youth, adults and seniors and providing an environmentally sustainable system to uplift communities. You can watch its segment in the daily show GMA (Good Morning America).

So while I was tinkering my small netbook (mini-laptop) awhile ago, at the same time looking for the falling statistics of my other hubs, my sister told me about her friend, also a mother (her house just across the alleyway) who's into urban farming. With just a small space at the back of her home, she converted it into a lively intermission of green colors of leaves and flowers of vegetables.

Human Resources

If we mobilize all people, young and adult, to venture into this interesting hobby in their cities, then hunger for food will be solved.

Let us start from our homes. Home gardening or backyard gardening can be a very relaxing hobby. Not only you will get your vegetable fresh from the garden, you will also provide the proper nutrients from your organic products.

Organic farming is also promoted in this kind of activity. It relies mainly on crop rotation, using green manure or compost, organic pest control, etc. to maintain the richness of the soil.

Budget

You don't have to worry about the expenses. Spending money in home gardening or backyard gardening is very minimal. Buying latest video games is more costly or expensive than buying seeds from the store.

I've seen grown seedlings at the agriculture section (usually located outside your nearest mall or store). If you want to grow it by yourself, you can buy seedlings inside the mall (flowering, fruits or vegetable seeds). There are also instructions given, how-to-do pamphlets provided included in the box or seed envelop. It involves the soil or compost you will use, fertilizer (preferably organic) and the best weather or season to plant your choice of seeds.

Lifestyle

Motivation is all we need to get started with this lucrative livelihood.

Even you're single or married already, you can still insert gardening in your to-do list. If you have children who are interested to help you or not, you can still encourage them and tell the importance of having a garden (a vegetable farm) at home.

Social groups and other organizations can extend a helping hand if this kind of project is nationwide. I think it's worlwide or the concern of everyone. Neighborhood associations, homeowners group, fraternities and sororities can revive the backbone of every country. And that is farming.

Encouraging them can be through "Green" contest. Meaning there will be a corresponding monetary prizes to those group who can start growing vegetables, flowers or fruits in a public , home or backyard garden.

Through urban gardening, other menace or crimes of the society will be lessen or eradicated. With this positive hobby, gardening that is, hunger and food shortage will be minimized.

Are You a Green Thumb?

To tell you frankly, I don't know the exact meaning of being a 'green thumb'. My parents told me that I am one of them. Whew! That's heavy.

I used to utilize our backyard by making garden plots and planting what's the available seeds I can get from our community (like tomatoes, bitter gourd, watermelon, eggplant, squash, peanuts and corn). How happy was I when I began harvesting my tomatoes, then and the other crops. I also planted cassava stems and vines for additional food.

At school since elementary grades, we have this subject called Home Economics.It's all about nutrition and food but also included clothing and sewing and also house management as in carpentry, etc.

All about Allotments

Allotments are public agricultural lands that can be cultivated by the community residents. The town or city council, parish community or private landowner can lease you an allotment if you don't have available land to farm.Assigning an allotment to a particular family or group is always discussed in a meeting in the council or in the community. However, private landowners can also provide you an allotment or they're kind enough to delegate for you a piece of land to grow your own produce aside from working with them.

It takes a Hub Community

Yes, the encouragement starts with us here, all hubbers (HubNuggets and Wannabees as well). We are not only writers, but we are also doers. We write what we do, we do what we write. Don't take this words on the wrong side of the law.

Urban farming takes us into the positive light of living in the city. By doing so, we can minimize the effects of pollution in our city and of course, global warming.

So take your shovel and hand gloves from your basement. It's time to cultivate our own home garden.

2012 Urban Farming Summit

The first-ever urban farming summit in Toronto, Canada last August 15 -18 was attended by urban professionals, community groups, tenants and developers, homeowners, urban farmers and other people's organization from around the world who tackled the issues of the conference.

Food security is the main reason. Another one is incorporating farming with the design of buildings being built in major cities.

Scaling up gardening in urban areas are what a particular community needs in order to meet the demands of the city dwellers.

Why in Toronto?

From what I've experienced as our cargo vessel loaded cargo at one of its ports way back May, 2009, I observed that residential areas and even the commercial ones are advocating urban gardening.

Toronto is a very good example of a leading city in urban gardening. The city has an innovative urban gardening programs the help residents of the community and building designers to merge at one common goal: food sustenance in the city!

(Updated September 22, 2012)

Detroit-The Green City

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Comments 8 comments

Aqua profile image

Aqua 6 years ago from California

Very interesting hub. I have never heard of this concept of "vertical farming". What a wonderful idea and it would be so nice to have places like this existing in major cities. I think we all need to do our share and promote these types of ideas. There are so many benefits to this concept. I am very interested in trying to grow some basic veggies like tomatoes and other easy to grow vegetables in my yard or even in pots on my deck. Fresh really is best. Thanks so much for this great hub!


travel_man1971 profile image

travel_man1971 6 years ago from Bicol, Philippines Author

You're welcome, Aqua. The concept of "vertical farming" is much suited in crowded cities around the world. Yes, you can grow your own tomatoes as your main plant in your backyard or even pots. I was told lately by my sister that it's not a veggie, it's a fruit. Okay, I said.

Thanks again.


BkCreative profile image

BkCreative 6 years ago from Brooklyn, New York City

Wonderful hub! We should never be so far removed from real food - which explains why Americans are so fat, and sick. Our food is grown anywhere under the worst conditions and have almost no nutrients when we eat them.

I wrote a hub about an amazing urban farmer in Wisconsin - he was just awarded a Fulbright for a half million dollars$ for all his great ideas in urban farming. (Yes, tomato is a fruit!).

Enjoyed the hub!


travel_man1971 profile image

travel_man1971 6 years ago from Bicol, Philippines Author

Thanks BkCreative. It's really inspiring to know what the government is doing for the farmers. I hope it's not just an award to compensate for the efforts being made by these heroes who are the "backbone" of every country. They should give priorities on this sector whole year round.


onegoodwoman profile image

onegoodwoman 5 years ago from A small southern town

It is good that you bring this to light, making more aware of what can be produced with little areas.

Green thumb means you have a natural talent for growing things.


travel_man1971 profile image

travel_man1971 5 years ago from Bicol, Philippines Author

Thanks, onegoodwoman. And the definition, too! Plants will make a good intermission and good oxidizer in a crowded city one is living in, right now!


ferzam 4 years ago

your site bro is great. been reading things about urban gardening and although i did my own in the past in various occasions, mine was on and off. i had pots for few veggie in my home and recently i decided to plant more veggies. i created additional plots for veggies... goodluck for your informative site...


travel_man1971 profile image

travel_man1971 4 years ago from Bicol, Philippines Author

@ferzam: Good luck to you, too. It's a good thing to know that you are also promoting urban gardening, albeit, organic farming.

You can also write what you know here on HubPages. Don't be just a guest user. You can also start earning here, aside from planting veggies.

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