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CVS to workers: Tell us how much you weigh or it'll cost you $600 yr

  1. Stacie L profile image87
    Stacie Lposted 4 years ago

    CVS to workers: Tell us how much you weigh or it'll cost you $600 a year


    CVS employees have been told they are required by May 1 to show up to a doctor for an annual WebMD Wellness Review and submit to tests for blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol and body mass and body weight.
    By Amy Langfield, TODAY contributor

    CVS Caremark has put its employees on notice that they need to reveal their weight or pay a monthly $50 penalty.

    Avoid the $600 annual surcharge,CVS warns its employees who use the companys health insurance plan. Theyve been told they are required by May 1 to show up to a doctor for an annual WebMD Wellness Review and submit to tests for blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol and body mass and body weight.
    http://lifeinc.today.com/_news/2013/03/ … &pos=4
    It's like adding insult to injury . Humiliate your employees or make them pay...No one wins

  2. paradigmsearch profile image90
    paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago

    I know some folks pretty well there. Next time I'm there, I'll bring this up.

  3. rebekahELLE profile image92
    rebekahELLEposted 4 years ago

    I hardly ever shop there, but now they just lost a customer.  Why would a company that promotes 'wellness' penalize their employees?

  4. WriteAngled profile image92
    WriteAngledposted 4 years ago

    Sounds more like Hitler's Germany than "land of the free".

  5. psycheskinner profile image79
    psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago

    I don't necessarily agree with the requirement.  But how is requiring a health check a penalization? There is nothing to suggest the answer would be publicized to their peers.  It sounds like the dictor would know it, and it would probably be included in some anonymised averges in reports about the heath of their workforce.  Nor is a person's approximate weight much of a secret in most workplaces.

    I see the requirement to stop smoking as far more oppressive.  Smokers not trying to quit will be fired.  Overweight people will not.

    In general, the answer is to sign up and lie about trying to be healthy.  Then they can;t touch you.

    1. rebekahELLE profile image92
      rebekahELLEposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Did you read the link?  They have until May 1 to have the screening and have to sign a form saying that it's voluntary.  If they don't do it, their insurance increases $50.00 a month.  I wouldn't call that a healthy incentive.  Otherwise, they're penalized for not submitting to something that is supposed to be voluntary.

      (we cross posted, I see you read the link.)

      1. psycheskinner profile image79
        psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I see the "pretending to be voluntary" as an issue. I see the firing smokers who are happy to be smokers as an issue.

        I don't see any irony in relation to making people healthy.  This stuff is clearly to try and make workers healthy and thus insurance less expensive.

        It is a problem to the extent you see people as having the right to be unhealthy--which I do.

  6. cluense profile image80
    cluenseposted 4 years ago

    Blame OBMACARE!

    1. psycheskinner profile image79
      psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      For any particular reason? Or should I say RESON!

  7. peeples profile image87
    peeplesposted 4 years ago

    I don't see this any different than I see companies who charge smokers extra each month if they choose not to quit. This especially makes since if the government pays a percentage of their employees insurance. Why should they have to pay extra for employees who CHOOSE to live unhealthy? I'd say $50 extra is a great incentive to encourage people to do better for themselves. If they don't want to be told just pay the extra $50 a month. My husband pays his extra every month for being a smoker.

    1. wilderness profile image96
      wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Absolutely.  Either live your life the way I think you should or pay the fine.

      Or, if it's all about the cost of health care, shouldn't they charge women more?  Not only are reproductive disorders much more common in women, but they even have the temerity to get pregnant!

      1. peeples profile image87
        peeplesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Or better yet they can pay for their own insurance. You don't get to be picky when you're expecting someone to pay something for you.

  8. profile image0
    Tayshiaposted 4 years ago

    I saw this on the local news last night too.  Apparently Safeway has been doing the same thing for few years.  Recently I received a notice from my employer that I have to take a 'survey' and build toward bonus health points to be able to save on my medical insurance next year.  I work for a private university, so, they can do whatever they want.  However, I don't think that 'save' is the right word.  My insurance would not be reduced, perhaps not increased.  I am not to happy with having my health information documented at work.

 
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