Unemployment insurance

  1. 60
    wandapennyposted 7 years ago

    Is'nt it illegal for a company to fire a person, then put on their separation papers that they quit, so that the company does not have to give them unemployment? It happened to a close friend of mine that I also worked with. One of the Supervisors did not like her. He went to the company owner telling him that she was causing trouble with another employee, which was a lie. It never happened. He told the supervisor to let her go. The next day when she went to pick up her check, they were not even going to give her a copy of her separate notice. She insisted on getting a copy from the company secretary, and that is when she found out that the owner had the supervisor put on the paper that she had quit. I was present when all of this was occuring, none of it is true. Can she get something done about this? It has even kept her from getting another job because, when prospective employers ask her why she is no longer working for the company, she has to try to explain to them that she was fired because of the supervisors dislike of her. When they call the company for a job reference, they tell them that she quit, and they don't why she says she got fired. So some of the prospective employers have trouble believing that she is telling the truth. My friend has only missed 1 day of work in the 2 years that she was on the job, She was never late, and never took off early for any reason. We live in Atlanta, Georgia. CAN ANYONE PLEASE HELP, SHE WAS WRONGED!!!!Please put us in touch with ANYONE who can help her.


    1. rharper profile image79
      rharperposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      It's illegal, but it is the company's word verses the ex-employee.

      Also, if  the person worked for a temp service, they may have signed additional documents about checking in twice a week. 


  2. 0
    Leta Sposted 7 years ago

    If it is a 'right to work state,' there is very little you can do, in all reality.

    You might want to see Ralph Deeds hubs on unemployment insurance, etc.  Good information.

    Also, consider (in her situation & what I'd do) temp agencies to get over the hump of this event.  If she worked at this place for a long time, it isn't like she's going to be able just to omit it from her resume.  She might also consider self employment.