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Thought for DISCUSSION

  1. gmwilliams profile image83
    gmwilliamsposted 23 months ago

    http://usercontent1.hubimg.com/8215786.jpg
    When will those staunch proponents of equal income for all realize that people get paid based upon their particular skill, education, expertise, brand, talent, and/or all of the above?  There will NEVER be such a thing as equal income in a society as different jobs requires different levels of skills and/or education.  Also, there are some jobs that are deemed MORE valuable than others and such people are paid accordingly.

    1. psycheskinner profile image79
      psycheskinnerposted 23 months ago in reply to this

      The call is for equal income for equal work.  And I agree with it.

    2. janesix profile image60
      janesixposted 23 months ago in reply to this

      Is a McDonald's CEO more "valuable" than a high school math teacher? They certainly get paid a lot more.

      1. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
        Kathryn L Hillposted 23 months ago in reply to this

        What is fair?
        free market!
        what is not fair?
        forced market!
        Business is business and teaching is teaching… choices were made. If the math teacher had the skills of a CEO you wouldn't be there crying for the math teacher, now would you Janesix?

        Frankly, teachers can't handle the real world as far as I see. If you want to make money delve into the world of marketing. Delve into the world of making and managing capital.

        Capital: "capital money, finance(s), funds, wherewithal, means, assets, wealth, resources, investment capital; cash, dough, bread, loot, bucks." T

        1. janesix profile image60
          janesixposted 23 months ago in reply to this

          "Also, there are some jobs that are deemed MORE valuable than others and such people are paid accordingl"

          This is the issue I was addressing in my post.

          Are people "valued" by how much money they make?

          And how is a CEO of McDonald's more "valuable" than a teacher? I would say the teaching job is more valuable to society than an over-paid CEO of a large, useless company that can't even pay it's worker's a decent wage, yet the top dogs rake in millions a year.

          It's disgusting.

          1. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 23 months ago in reply to this

            "Are people "valued" by how much money they make? "

            Are you buying people or buying the products of their labor?  It makes a huge difference.

            "And how is a CEO of McDonald's more "valuable" than a teacher?"

            Part of "value" resides in the supply of the product - in this case the labor.  How many people could (effectively) be a CEO and how many could be a math teacher?

            (Personally, I think most CEO's of large corporations are grossly overpaid, but then I'm not beating the streets trying to outbid the competition to get a good one, either.  It is entirely possible that my opinion is a result of that lack of competing to buy such labor.)

            1. janesix profile image60
              janesixposted 23 months ago in reply to this

              This is only a matter of this being morally repugnant to me.

              I understand the reality.

              I know we could never live in my idealistic society.

              1. wilderness profile image95
                wildernessposted 23 months ago in reply to this

                Confusion.  What is morally repugnant in purchasing what someone has worked to produce?  And paying the mutually agreed upon price?

                1. janesix profile image60
                  janesixposted 23 months ago in reply to this

                  It is repugnant to me that ANYONE would make millions of dollars per year, while many make barely enough to live on (and millions DON'T make enough to live on world-wide). I don't even understand how someone could be that greedy.

                  1. wilderness profile image95
                    wildernessposted 23 months ago in reply to this

                    Sounds like you are playing god and assigning value yourself, without regard to market pressure.  Yes?

                    But while I might agree with you (and play god myself), the answer isn't very plain.  As a billionaire CEO, give up your salary and let it revert, a few dollars at a time, to the stockholders?  Pour it out into charity, maybe schools or something that might do some good rather than simply giving it away (with 90% of it going to bureaucrats and administrators that teach nothing)?  Take it and start a new business with a hundred highly paid workers and no profits to assuage your conscience?  Keep it and use the power it bestows to make political changes beneficial to the poor?

  2. profile image60
    literarily_leoposted 23 months ago

    gmwilliams, I appreciate you using your voice on this topic, but I'm a little confused.  I have never heard anyone seriously speak on the issue of equal income for all.  I hope everyone realizes that a Doctor and a clerk at a local store won't make the same amount of money, ever, unless the clerk wins the lottery or something, or has a long lost wealthy relative suddenly leave a fortune.  The equality in paychecks issue I hear most people discussing is between men and women doing the same job.  Why should a woman who holds the same degree, who has the same experience and is doing exactly the same job as her male coworker (or peer from another company) get paid up to 30% less than him?  Maybe I have misunderstood what you meant, of course we won't all make the same amount of money, education level, economics, democracy and capitalism control that. In a socialist society wealth is shared more, but divides and gaps of income and education still exist, but the way I understand it, in certain forms of socialism lower income people receive more help than our system provides and I've heard it is cheaper in the long run to do it that way.  But all socialist governments don't work the same way.

    As for the disparity between the extremely wealthy and the working poor in the U.S. that is a national scandal, a blight on our history.  In 100 or more years, if we don't obliterate ourselves from this planet, historians will likely call this the era of greed and social inequality.  Look for a future blog on this issue from me. 
    Sincerely, literarily_leo

  3. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
    Kathryn L Hillposted 23 months ago

    At what point are those who work turned into SLAVES for others?

    1. janesix profile image60
      janesixposted 23 months ago in reply to this

      Probably never.

  4. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
    Kathryn L Hillposted 23 months ago

    We give our money to those we WISH to give it to...
    seeing how we have a free market and all.

 
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