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Would you accept ???

  1. emievil profile image83
    emievilposted 7 years ago

    If you're the boss and you had a shouting match with your employee wherein you saw that she no longer has any respect for you as her boss. Later on she tenders her resignation then she wants to revoke it (and apologizes also, by the way) but you already accepted her resignation, would you revoke your acceptance too and accept her back????

    1. Stevennix2001 profile image84
      Stevennix2001posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      hell no.  if she honestly had no respect for me, then walked out and quit on bad terms like that, then I sure as hell wouldn't take her back.  no matter what her sob story would be, as i would tell her that i don't care.  don't get me wrong, Im not trying to sound like a jerk here.  however, if you do hire her back, then your basically sending a message to other employees that it's essentially okay to disrespect you and mock you openly because they know they can get away with it.  at least that's my take anyway. smile

      1. emievil profile image83
        emievilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        My thoughts exactly Stevennix.

        1. Stevennix2001 profile image84
          Stevennix2001posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          that's true.  i guess it's true what they say.  great minds think alike.  wink smile

          1. emievil profile image83
            emievilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            lol

    2. Daddy Paul profile image62
      Daddy Paulposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I never got into shouting matches with my employees. It shows a lack of respect for them. If you hire good people and treat them with respect then shouting will not happen.

      1. emievil profile image83
        emievilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Even if she was the one who first shouted at you???

        1. Daddy Paul profile image62
          Daddy Paulposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          I never had anyone who worked for me shout at me other than to avoid danger. When people are treated with respect they seldom yell. Further if a person feels they are being heard they seldom feel the need to shout.
          Just for the sake of example look at the tea party people. Many say the same thing. Washington is not listening to them.

    3. Daniel Carter profile image91
      Daniel Carterposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      There is such a thing as true contrite regret. If it appears that true contrition is there, I *may* consider letting her stay, but with some very stringent conditions for a specified period--perhaps 6 months or more. If she really wants to come back, then she has to prove it by paying the price of showing respect and being a valuable team player and employee.

      If, however, she shows signs of faking her regret, I wouldn't even look her direction. She sealed her fate. Jobs are tough enough to find, so let her go find another. She blew it.

      1. emievil profile image83
        emievilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I wished she showed true contrition but my gut feeling says she's not contrite. I have facts to back them but I won't get in them right now.

        1. SaiKit profile image78
          SaiKitposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Americans need to learn to respect the persons who created employments for them. They need to learn that they are not victims but have the obligation and responsibility to earn their jobs and money.

          So.

    4. profile image0
      Deborah Sextonposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      That depends. Did the boss provoke the employee?
      A boss should never have a shouting match with employess.

      1. emievil profile image83
        emievilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Nope. It's the other way around.

      2. jossecarr profile image60
        jossecarrposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        There are bosses that are sometimes too hard to deal with. May be the employee loose out all the patience. smile

    5. Obscure Divine profile image60
      Obscure Divineposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      She'd be shitcanned!  Say, "bye, c-ya later..."

    6. profile image0
      mtsi1098posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      As a small business owner...I would not accept her back.  If she resigned in the first place what will stop it from happening again - good luck

    7. tessaph profile image60
      tessaphposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      hahaha.. i can relate.. OMG

    8. profile image60
      RakhiChowdharyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I would also never accept her back, same thoughts ...

    9. Sab Oh profile image61
      Sab Ohposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      What does she look like?

  2. The Best Man profile image60
    The Best Manposted 7 years ago

    If she was a good employee who was having a bad day, and given that by apologizing she was admitting she did wrong then I would be tempted to give her a 2nd chance.

    1. alternate poet profile image78
      alternate poetposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      yes - then fire her again !

  3. tobey100 profile image60
    tobey100posted 7 years ago

    I'd like to stand firm like Stevennix but......I'm a softie and I'd probably take her back.

  4. profile image0
    ralwusposted 7 years ago

    depends on how sexy she was. does she wear short skirts?

    1. emievil profile image83
      emievilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      LOL. CC, I don't think her boss will notice, she's female too big_smile

      1. tobey100 profile image60
        tobey100posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Ya never know!  (If you happen to be the boss in question, my apologies.)

  5. Urbane Chaos profile image91
    Urbane Chaosposted 7 years ago

    First, what does company policy say about it?

    Second, look at the facts: 1. She engaged in a shouting match with her boss, and 2. she put in her resignation.  Forget about what kind of person she is, think about the business.  If she can get away with that, so can your other employees.  It's time that she finds new employment.

    On the other side of things, is this what you want your business image to be?  As a boss, one should never get in a shouting match with an employee.  At the least, that boss will start to be seen as one who is over-temperamental, at the most, that boss could potentially get into legal trouble because of it.  It's always best to walk away, and then confront the issue when both sides are more relaxed.

    If you do feel bad about firing the employee, there are options.  I had to fire an employee of mine who was truly a great man.  Unfortunately, I didn't have a choice in matters.  But, because he was such a good employee (besides this one unforgivable incident) I took the time to write him an outstanding reference letter, as well as helped him get another job elsewhere.

    So yes, the employee should have been dumped asap.  And, if she was hot, at least get a picture of her walking through the door. big_smile

  6. emievil profile image83
    emievilposted 7 years ago

    @tobey, yup I'm the boss in question smile.

    @Urban Chaos, first - respect in the office is a big part of our code of ethics. second - that's why I didn't accept her revocation as it will undermine my position as the boss.

    On the business image - this is only my third time (in 3 years) that I lost my temper (I seldom lose it by the way) and this is the first time she shouted at me (but once is enough). Suffice it to say that her attitude started it and I just finished it. I don't regret going through the match with her and legally, I have witnesses who will testify about her insubordination. By the way, did I say that she started all of it in front of my other employees?

    1. Urbane Chaos profile image91
      Urbane Chaosposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      You're doing better than a lot of people out there.  If this is only the third in three years, that's understandable.. Still, it's always best to try to avoid the situation.  You asked the question in a general sort-of-way, so I answered in like.  Sometimes it is hard to keep ones temper when you're the boss - I know, been there, done that, got the t-shirt.

      And I've learned, it doesn't matter if it is in front of other employees or not - word always has a way of getting around.  It starts off small, "My boss yelled at me", but by the time it gets spread out it ends up, "My boss called me a @%$%# and told me that they're going to fire everyone!"  You've played the telephone game.. Obviously, it's uncommon for that to happen, but it can - and does.  Best to avoid these situations all together.

      It sounds like you handled yourself pretty well though.  In doing what you did, you've gained respect in your employees eyes.

      1. emievil profile image83
        emievilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks.

  7. profile image0
    ralwusposted 7 years ago

    But you put in the way if I was the boss. LOL Some women are like that too ya know? I was a certified mgr for a time, and I never fired anyone, I told them they just earned the right to leave, and when they did, there would be no returns.

    1. emievil profile image83
      emievilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      LOL, I forgot I did start the thread with that question. I never fired a subordinate also and thank God I didn't start with her. But when she told me she will resign, I just told her to go ahead. I didn't try to stop her, the damage has been done and can no longer be repaired.

      1. Daniel Carter profile image91
        Daniel Carterposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Then I think you have your answer, emie. If you can sense and have clues that she's not sincere, then there NO WAY she will ever be a valuable employee to you or your company. It's a sham on her part, so she can continue the office drama, undermine you, (get even) which you and your company don't need.

        That's my take.

        1. emievil profile image83
          emievilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Thanks Daniel.

  8. profile image0
    Deborah Sextonposted 7 years ago

    It's called diplomacy. It is the social mask.

    I've witnessed bosses letting employee after employee go and then the bosses were later terminated (not for letting the employees go)

    I see it as Karma.

    1. emievil profile image83
      emievilposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      But then diplomacy doesn't really work in all situations right? And on the termination side - the only way I'll be terminated is when I close down the company smile. But then again, I do believe in Karma and I'm prepared for it. Heck, it will be worth it.

      1. Stevennix2001 profile image84
        Stevennix2001posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        well if you ask me, it sounds like karma already handled this one.  this girl was being rude, and now she's out of a job, so it looks like karma already happened.

  9. Polly C profile image88
    Polly Cposted 7 years ago

    It depends on whether it was her fault entirely, or a situation which was partially of my causing...employers are not perfect. I once worked for a woman who, at times, was truly horrible to her employees, through no fault of their own - she deserved to be shouted at, quite honestly (though I'd like to think I would never act like her in the first place!)

  10. Polly C profile image88
    Polly Cposted 7 years ago

    But if it was her entirely her fault, then I would not accept her back...unless maybe a personal situation was causing her a lot of stress so that she wasn't acting herself?

  11. waynet profile image49
    waynetposted 7 years ago

    I would say yes, if she gave me half of her wages!! every week for life! even if she gets another job, still I demand her wages!!!

    1. Polly C profile image88
      Polly Cposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      God, I wouldn't want to work for you!smile

  12. habee profile image92
    habeeposted 7 years ago

    I'm a very forgiving person, so I'd say yes.

  13. Polly C profile image88
    Polly Cposted 7 years ago

    Actually, I think it would depend on the woman and her character - how good an employee she had been up until that point.

  14. habee profile image92
    habeeposted 7 years ago

    Good point, Polly!

  15. Greek One profile image79
    Greek Oneposted 7 years ago

    hold on a second!  they are letting women in the workforce now!??

    1. profile image0
      Kathryn LJposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, but only to make the tea,  laugh at the guys jokes and chew pencils provocatively.

      1. Greek One profile image79
        Greek Oneposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        are you sure you aren't talking about married life?

        1. profile image0
          Kathryn LJposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          nah, thats more like scowling while making the tea, making jokes about the guys and poking hubbies pencil up the cats bum!

          1. Greek One profile image79
            Greek Oneposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            http://ct.iscute.com/i81/7/1/16/f_d2d5e9db0f9d.jpg

            1. profile image0
              Kathryn LJposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              Poor kitty, I feel awful now.  Actually, no I don't! Maniacal laughter #~~~~

              1. Greek One profile image79
                Greek Oneposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                Just for you Kathryn, now available on Ebay...

                http://www.prlog.org/10093804-sharp-end-cat-pencil-sharpener.jpg

                1. profile image0
                  Kathryn LJposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                  Brilliant!!!! But it wasn't that end of the pencil I meant.  It was the chewy end.  HAHAHA!

          2. profile image60
            kshartlineposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            How awful! I am an animal lover and I think that is very cruel!!!!

  16. profile image0
    Roseradposted 7 years ago

    Hi
    Yes I would as long as she takes an anger management course. We are all human and humans make many mistakes. We are a very emotional species and we all have said and done things we regret.

  17. readytoescape profile image60
    readytoescapeposted 7 years ago

    While you do not give the parameters of the argument, for which there may have been good reason for disagreement, the simple fact of the matter is the employee’s transgression of flagrant and public insubordination is enough for termination.

    This is a bridge that has been burned and cannot be re-crossed, if you were to allow it, your back would become the bridge and not for one, but for all.

    There will always be disagreements, but in this type of environment one may put forth and argument, certainly not in the manner described, but the final decision lies with the hierarchy, period.

  18. Lady_E profile image81
    Lady_Eposted 7 years ago

    I'd forgive her but would not take her back.

    1) What's to say she won't do it again?

    2) Can I travel for one week and leave my Business in her "capable" hands, to look after my clients?

    I don't think so.

    Good Luck. smile

  19. Rafini profile image85
    Rafiniposted 7 years ago

    I would have a long talk with her before making a decision.  During that talk I would aim to discuss the reasons behind her shouting in order to suggest she enroll in anger management.  I would then go one step further and require anger management classes if she truly wished to retain her employment with me.  If she truly wished to remain employed with me, I would give her a written warning (begin that paper trail!!) and put her on probation. 

    If I felt she was insincere, forget it.  I don't have the time to pussyfoot around to keep her off the bread line.  It's her problem, not mine.

  20. LeanMan profile image81
    LeanManposted 7 years ago

    Women in the workplace.... None of that here in saudi... lol

  21. pisean282311 profile image58
    pisean282311posted 7 years ago

    smile...it depends..i like girls shouting or not shouting...on serious notes since u think that her regret is superficial there is no point in having her again.

  22. shazwellyn profile image83
    shazwellynposted 7 years ago

    It depended on her capabilities on the work.  If she was good at what she did, I would take her back and try and make it work.

  23. TMMason profile image72
    TMMasonposted 7 years ago

    No.

    Go get in line at the unemployment office... and then I would fight that.

  24. profile image0
    Go Writerposted 7 years ago

    Look at her track record. How is she as an employee?

    Is she on time? Always loyal but disagreeing with you on a point she can't get over? It could be a matter of setting her straight, understanding her viewpoint, but holding your ground and telling her you're the boss.

    While I'm not proud of it, I've been in a shouting match with my boss before. It wasn't out of disrespect. I've dealt with the meanest, heady and most forgetful bosses ever and put up with them. But this particular one was a doozy. He was conveniently forgetful.

    It was over a ridiculous piece of miscommunication that I and several other members of my team double and triple checked that that's what the boss wanted. He still forget and slammed us double hard, blaming us for a mistake he made. This was long after months of past attempts where I personally consulted with my boss to find out the best way we could clear up our communication mishaps.

    This was the last straw. I finally had to put my foot down. He was the one who started the shouting match, too.

    But I never, ever went over his head. I said my piece, but he was the boss. If that meant I had to be fired or moved, then it was his prerogative to do so. I've heard of predecessors cursing him out and calling him names. I could never do that.

    If, however, your employee is experiencing "creative differences" and feels you aren't doing your job right without a valid reason, she needs to basically sit back down, shut up and color or go find work elsewhere.

    There's only one boss, and that is you. If you feel that she's worth a second chance, then give her a second chance, but this time she has to work extra hard to stay on your good side. She breaks that second trust. She's out. She shapes up, or she's out.

    However, if her track record has been terrible up to this point...let her go. Flighty people like that become a headache. One day work. Next day not work. I've had to do that with one of my employees. No point in keeping her. Waste of time and money.

    I've learned as an employer to correct things up front. I've seen good people go bad because they were never given correction, they get a bad report and then they're out because they've never been told what they did wrong. That would be the fault of the boss.

    However, you correct and she can't handle correction, then toss her. She better know who's in charge and obey.

  25. profile image60
    Prithaposted 6 years ago

    Give her a second chance..............
    Lets hate the Fault not the faulter.......

  26. profile image0
    Rookie70posted 6 years ago

    emievil, I need a job, why not hire me? I'm a good worker. Obama isn't helping me.

 
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