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Would you work overseas?

  1. LeanMan profile image82
    LeanManposted 6 years ago

    I am originally from the UK, but I have been working now in Saudi Arabia for the last three years. The reasons being that I had been wiped out financially by ex-wives who took property etc. Being early forties I only have so much time to build a nest egg for my future therefore Saudi Arabia with good wages and zero tax seemed like a good option despite the issues with working here..
    I have limited communication with my family being here and it wrecked a long term relationship within a few months - although I am now in a much healthier one..

    But would you do it? If not why not?

    1. rebekahELLE profile image91
      rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      if it was the right time, job and country, yes, I would. but I'm sure I would want to come back at some point, not a permanent move. I think it would be fascinating to work with some of the educational outreach programs in other countries or a teaching position of the English language.

      1. LeanMan profile image82
        LeanManposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I really don't want to go back to UK, rather keep moving and try more places..

        Teaching is great fun but heartbreaking in some countries, I am not a teacher but have been into a couple of schools in parts of africa and met the children just for fun...

  2. Sab Oh profile image61
    Sab Ohposted 6 years ago

    It can be a great experience.

  3. Princessa profile image85
    Princessaposted 6 years ago

    I have done it -in a way- although I moved first and found the job after. 

    I think working overseas enriches your life, it makes you more open to new ideas.  I would recommend it anytime.  However I think working overseas requires a special personality, one that is not attached to friends, family or material possesions.  It can be very hard to leave everything and start again from zero.  For me, that is the exciting part, everytime I move countries is like a new beginning.

  4. profile image0
    Home Girlposted 6 years ago

    Well, Princessa is right, you need a special personality. I am such a home girl(re:chicken).

    1. Princessa profile image85
      Princessaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      It is also easier when you have no children or when they are very young.  The older your children get, the more reluctant they can be to move countries.

  5. LeanMan profile image82
    LeanManposted 6 years ago

    It is great fun, new experiences, new cultures, new people, new challenges, new frustrations,.....

    All in all an experience that changes your entire outlook on life..

  6. Fluffymetal profile image78
    Fluffymetalposted 6 years ago

    YES I would do it in your position.  I would do it myself for at least a year.

  7. Misha profile image74
    Mishaposted 6 years ago

    Absolutely. I do it smile

    And Alla, you do it too - you are far from being a chicken smile

    1. profile image0
      Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      No, Misha, I just pretend to be strong, don't have a choice.  Canadian experience was too much for me, I am not taking any chances any more. Though as they say: never say never.

      1. Misha profile image74
        Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        LOL You moved to Canada from your home country and you work in Canada, right? Means you work overseas smile

    2. Sufidreamer profile image81
      Sufidreamerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      That's only because you are a spy big_smile

      1. Misha profile image74
        Mishaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Well, no body asked why, so i don't  have to specify wink

        1. rebekahELLE profile image91
          rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          lol




          leanman, yes, I'm sure teaching could be heartbreaking and I guess that's one reason it is appealing, to at least try to help these children..  teaching can be immensely rewarding.
          there is a non-profit group that builds schools and supplies books to poor countries started by an American who quit his Microsoft executive position. I read the book years ago, now I can't think of his name. I think it sounds so rewarding.

          EDIT: now I remember his name. John Wood, he wrote Leaving Microsoft to Change the World and started Room to Read.

  8. Sufidreamer profile image81
    Sufidreamerposted 6 years ago

    This is my third time living in another country.

    It isn't always easy (I am still struggling to find the time to learn decent Greek), but the good far outweighs the bad.

    I have absolutely no intention of going back to live in the UK smile

    1. profile image0
      Home Girlposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Why,Sufidreamer? Is Greece better, or you do not like UK, or you do not like changes like me?

      1. Sufidreamer profile image81
        Sufidreamerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Greece is a wonderful part of the world and we intend to be here for a long time - sun, Ouzo, freedom, history and less stress.

        I just wish that I had more time to enjoy it, but setting up a business takes time whatever country you live in. smile

        @Misha: Spying is a profession with good career prospects and a healthy pension. If Russia needs someone for a bit of commercial espionage on Kostas the Goatherder, I am available.

        @Rebekah - That sounds like the true Greek experience. Work hard and then party all night!

    2. rebekahELLE profile image91
      rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Sufi,the other night we went to a Greek community nearby for their monthly Night in the Islands celebration. It is in the Greek section of Tarpon Springs, the streets are closed, tables are set up in the streets with outside dining, Greek dancing and musicians.. such fun and I know they do this often in other countries, it is part of their culture.
      so for a while, I felt like I was in a village in Greece.
      it is a true fishing village with the sponge boats and big shrimpers. the other day we went for dinner along the water and saw a US customs and immigration boat sail by.. not something we typically see.

 
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